Blimpish Blinded

Blind

Meanings and phrases

blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. unable to see; --Kenneth Jernigan; unsighted
  2. unable or unwilling to perceive or understand
  3. not based on reason or evidence; unreasoning

blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. people who have severe visual impairments, considered as a group
  2. a hiding place sometimes used by hunters (especially duck hunters)
  3. a protective covering that keeps things out or hinders sight; screen
  4. something intended to misrepresent the true nature of an activity; subterfuge

blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. render unable to see
  2. make blind by putting the eyes out
  3. make dim by comparison or conceal; dim

Venetian blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a window blind made of horizontal strips that overlap when closed

blind alley

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a street with only one way in or out; cul de sac; dead-end street; impasse
  2. (figurative) a course of action that is unproductive and offers no hope of improvement

blind bend

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a curve or bend in the road that you cannot see around as you are driving; blind curve

blind corner

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a street corner that you cannot see around as you are driving

blind curve

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a curve or bend in the road that you cannot see around as you are driving; blind bend

blind date

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a participant in a blind date (someone you meet for the first time when you have a date with them)
  2. a date with a stranger
E.g.
  • Meanwhile, Kate is on a blind date that is not going well.
  • They met for the first time on a blind date in the late 1990s.
  • The blind date is a success and the pair head to an afterparty.

blind drunk

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. very drunk; besotted; blotto; crocked; cockeyed; fuddled; loaded; pie-eyed; pissed; pixilated; plastered; slopped; sloshed; smashed; soaked; soused; sozzled; squiffy; stiff; tight; wet

blind eel

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. aquatic eel-shaped salamander having two pairs of very small feet; of still muddy waters in the southern United States; amphiuma; congo snake; congo eel

blind flying

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. using only instruments for flying an aircraft because you cannot see through clouds or mists etc.; blind landing

blind gentian

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. similar to Gentiana andrewsii but with larger flowers; closed gentian; Gentiana clausa
  2. gentian of eastern North America having tubular blue or white flowers that open little if at all; closed gentian; bottle gentian; Gentiana andrewsii

blind gut

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the cavity in which the large intestine begins and into which the ileum opens; cecum; caecum

blind landing

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. using only instruments for flying an aircraft because you cannot see through clouds or mists etc.; blind flying

blind person

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a person with a severe visual impairment

blind side

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the side on which your vision is limited or obstructed

blind snake

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. wormlike burrowing snake of warm regions having vestigial eyes; worm snake
E.g.
  • The Common blind snake ("Indotyphlops braminus") measures long, occasionally up to long.
  • A viable population of a type of blind snake from the family Typhlopidae may be present, probably the brahminy blind snake ("Ramphotyphlops braminus").

blind spot

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a subject about which you are ignorant or prejudiced and fail to exercise good judgment
  2. the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light; optic disc; optic disk
E.g.
  • They are cheap to produce but cause scotoma, a ringed blind spot.
  • However, the augmented radar sensor suite would be able to detect obstacles in the LiDAR blind spot.
  • One apprentice wrote: "He is devoid of consideration and has a blind spot regarding others' qualities.

blind staggers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a disease of the central nervous system affecting especially horses and cattle; characterized by an unsteady swaying gait and frequent falling; staggers

blind stitching

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. stitching that is not easily seen or noticed

blind trust

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a trust that enables a person to avoid possible conflict of interest by transferring assets to a fiduciary; the person establishing the trust gives up the right to information about the assets

double blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a test procedure in which the identity of those receiving the intervention is concealed from both the administrators and the subjects until after the test is completed; designed to reduce or eliminate bias in the results

fly blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. fly an airplane solely by relying on instruments

roller blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a window shade that rolls up out of the way

turn a blind eye

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. refuse to acknowledge

western blind snake

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. burrows among roots of shrubs and beneath rocks in desert and rocky hillside areas and beach sand of western United States; Leptotyphlops humilis

window blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a blind for privacy or to keep out light

blind eye

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Law enforcement turns a blind eye to these activities.
  • there was no loophole just a "blind eye").
  • Baseball has been taken to task for turning a blind eye to its drug problems.

blind man

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The blind man actually wants to sell a dream rather than buy one.
  • There, he befriended Henry Moyes, a young blind man who showed precocious aptitude.
  • As a boy he earned money from reading the reports of Parliament to a local blind man.

blind people

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A recent survey reveals that only 15% of blind people use braille.
  • Many blind people find this number machine a very useful tool throughout life.
  • This gave him a platform to train other blind people to work within radio stations.

blind auditions

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The blind auditions have also been extended from five to six episodes.
  • In the blind auditions she sang ""When I Was Your Man"" (Bruno Mars' song).
  • Filming for the blind auditions stage of the competition began on 21 August 2012.

blind audition

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The third blind audition episode was broadcast on .
  • The sixth blind audition episode was broadcast on .
  • The first blind audition episode was broadcast on .

became blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Has an initially good mother who became blind.
  • He developed an illness in his eyes and soon became blind.
  • At a young age he became blind in his right eye after an infection.

turn a blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • MacArthur replies because no American lives were lost because of it, he will turn a blind eye.
  • "A lot of people in Hong Kong tend to indulge themselves in mahjong playing and turn a blind eye to social problems.
  • And, because of the profit, I think there are many people with an interest involved, so they try to turn a blind eye to this problem.

turned a blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Regulators turned a blind eye to a lack of transparency and to conflicts of interest."
  • She believed some members of the family knew about his abuse but had turned a blind eye to it.
  • Charles turned a blind eye to the debacle, instead preoccupying himself with the plight of the French Huguenots of La Rochelle.

legally blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She is legally blind and discovered the body.
  • He became legally blind in 1989, at age 80.
  • In 1960, 50% of legally blind, school-age children were able to read braille in the U.S.

completely blind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Around this time he became effectively completely blind.
  • Hopkins' mother was left completely blind as a result of this attack.
  • He is now completely blind in his left eye and has severely limited vision in his right eye.
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