Causative Caused

Cause

Meanings and phrases

cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. events that provide the generative force that is the origin of something
  2. a justification for something existing or happening; reason; grounds
  3. a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end; campaign; crusade; drive; movement; effort
  4. any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results; causal agent; causal agency
  5. a comprehensive term for any proceeding in a court of law whereby an individual seeks a legal remedy; lawsuit; suit; case; causa

cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally; do; make
  2. cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; induce; stimulate; have; get; make

cause celebre

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an incident that attracts great public attention

cause of action

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a claim sufficient to demand judicial attention; the facts that give rise to right of action
E.g.
  • The elements of this cause of action are:
  • The former was the basis of the claim and was the real cause of action.
  • In the United States,"invasion of privacy" is a commonly used cause of action in legal pleadings.

cause of death

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the causal agent resulting in death; killer
E.g.
  • The coroner cited the wounds as the cause of death.
  • The cause of death was not immediately disclosed.
  • The cause of death was asphyxia by strangulation.

cause to be perceived

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. have perceptible qualities

cause to sleep

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. make fall asleep

final cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (philosophy) the end or purpose of a thing or process

first cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an agent that is the cause of all things but does not itself have a cause; prime mover; primum mobile

lost cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a defeated cause or a cause for which defeat is inevitable

probable cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (law) evidence sufficient to warrant an arrest or search and seizure
E.g.
  • Evidence points to drowning as the most probable cause of death.
  • In 2010, the Ethics Commission found probable cause to investigate.
  • Vroom on the other hand held that a showing of probable cause had been made.

not cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms.
  • felt that general anxiety does not cause trypophobia.
  • Triclosan does not cause staining of the teeth.

common cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They should be educated and unite for a common cause.
  • The use of a topical steroid is the most common cause.
  • The most common cause of expressive aphasia is stroke.

main cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The main cause of this condition is sun exposure.
  • This toxin is considered the main cause of CDAD.
  • Infectious diseases are a main cause of death for chimpanzees.

major cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Vasospasm is the major cause of Prinzmetal's angina.
  • Depression is a major cause of disability worldwide.
  • Diffraction can be a major cause of crosstalk.

cause problems

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Urban foxes can cause problems for local residents.
  • The clefts cause problems with facial muscle development.
  • This may cause problems with music and speech understanding.

cause damage

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Tropical cyclones only rarely cause damage in Cambodia.
  • Can cause damage to roses, raspberries and strawberries.
  • They are gregarious and can cause damage from minor to severe.

leading cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness.
  • NCDs are the leading cause of death globally.
  • In 2016, it was the leading cause of deaths in females.

known to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • n-Hexane is known to cause axonal damage in peripheral nerves.
  • There are many diseases known to cause ocular or visual changes.
  • The number of genes known to cause cases of KS/CHH is still increasing.

primary cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Meritocracy is a primary cause of status anxiety.
  • This ambiguity is a primary cause of "democratic deficit."
  • Hunting by humans is believed to be the primary cause of extinction.

most common cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The use of a topical steroid is the most common cause.
  • The most common cause of expressive aphasia is stroke.
  • Bacterial infection is the most common cause.

root cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This will narrow down the root cause of the problem while continuous testing.
  • PERC says that government policy is the root cause of much environmental degradation.
  • The graphic is constructed by: This approach tends to converge on a single root cause.

underlying cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ultimately the underlying cause needs to be treated.
  • are employed to access the underlying cause of the coma.
  • Treatment depends on the underlying cause.

cause serious

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Benzodiazepines can cause serious addiction problems.
  • This can cause serious harm to the species that drink the water.
  • It is a challenging exercise, as poor form or execution can cause serious injury.

cause severe

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It can cause severe and less often fatal strokes.
  • If ingested, the sap can cause severe damage to internal organs.
  • Skin contact with the roots can cause severe itching and swelling.

does not cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms.
  • felt that general anxiety does not cause trypophobia.
  • Triclosan does not cause staining of the teeth.

enough to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Exsanguination is blood loss severe enough to cause death.
  • Their mouths are not large enough to cause a human fatality.
  • They also avoid terrain rocky enough to cause problems with digging.

likely to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hitting the opponent's teeth or mouth is likely to cause mutual damage.
  • It is also safer as the tennis ball is soft and less likely to cause injury.
  • The same dose given over a longer period of time is less likely to cause ARS.

cause significant

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They can cause significant damage in cereal fields.
  • It can cause significant damage and wear.
  • Thus, these fruit flies cause significant damage to fruit crops.

did not cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This did not cause a deficiency in aggregate demand but in aggregate supply.
  • This B-17 was also shot down, but did not cause any further damage to the boat.
  • However, their presence which lasted until July 1919 did not cause great upset.

cause and effect

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The idiom is about confusing cause and effect.
  • Hume elaborates more on this last principle of cause and effect.
  • Humans understand cause and effect.

cause more

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Second-generation biofuels do not displace food production or cause more greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Bulls with horns will bunt (push or strike with the horns) in which can cause more damage overall.
  • That disregard proves fatal when three suicide bombers cause more than 700 deaths among worshipers.

likely cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • An unlicensed fireworks discharge was the likely cause.
  • Hunting by humans is believed to be the likely cause of extinction.
  • Meanwhile, however, an earthquake is considered as the most likely cause for the landslide.

cause harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Use during pregnancy can cause harm to the baby.
  • It may cause harm to the baby if taken during pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Certain sunscreen ingredients can cause harm if they penetrate the skin over time.

exact cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The exact cause of cardiac syndrome X is unknown.
  • The exact cause of the condition is unknown.
  • The exact cause is unknown.

cause trouble

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At times, both partners cause trouble for the other.
  • He is commanded to let 'no ravening bird cause trouble'.
  • They think it will cause trouble.

cause confusion

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It can cause confusion regarding incidentalomas.
  • Some differences in usage and meaning can cause confusion or embarrassment.
  • Names for old or unfamiliar local occupations may cause confusion if poorly legible.

cause disease

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This virus does not appear to cause disease in the shrimp.
  • Mutations in keratin proteins in the skin can cause disease.
  • Autoantibodies against proteins that hold the cells of the skin together can also cause disease.

cause for concern

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hoover said: The mad march of red fascism is a cause for concern in America.
  • The meeting minutes had registered the 1979 competition as a "cause for concern".
  • This unofficial candidacy was definitely a cause for concern among the Privy Council under Elizabeth.

possible cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Extreme economies of scale are one possible cause.
  • Another possible cause of condom failure is sabotage.
  • A possible cause might be insufficiently deep excisions.

shown to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Betel nut chewing has been shown to cause oral cancers.
  • Medical DXM use has not been shown to cause the above issues.
  • Osmotic stress has also been shown to cause the formation of clastosomes.

cause death

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Exsanguination is blood loss severe enough to cause death.
  • This form of the disease is usually mild and does not cause death.
  • Furthermore, drugs prescribed in May would not cause death in August.

determine the cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A post-mortem failed to determine the cause of death.
  • The investigation was unable to determine the cause of the thrust reduction."
  • If the fever disappears off treatment, then the drugs need to be tested individually to determine the cause.

immediate cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The immediate cause is the loss of most vegetation.
  • it was considered the immediate cause of the Sanhedrin's decision to move against Christ.
  • The immediate cause of death was a heart attack, brought on by complications of pneumonia.

cause cancer

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A virus that can cause cancer is called an "oncovirus".
  • Oxidative damage in DNA can cause cancer.
  • These mutations can cause cancer.

cause célèbre

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Glading's case became a cause célèbre and made national headlines.
  • They played a key role in the "cause célèbre" of the Franklin River Dam.
  • It was first published in 1991 and became an immediate "cause célèbre" and bestseller.

good cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • After 10 challenges, they have to show good cause (i.e.
  • His advocacy of the good cause was in frequent demand for meetings in London and the suburbs.
  • He or she serves as trustee for the duration of the case, but is subject to removal for good cause.

often cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Species of "Leccinum" often cause nausea when consumed raw.
  • Lunar eclipses occur only at a full moon and often cause a reddish hue on the near side of the Moon.
  • These migrations into the cities often cause large numbers of unemployed people, who end up living in slums.

no cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • ), Brahms, Rubinstein & Wagner, so had no cause to complain."
  • In 10–20% of cases, no cause is found.
  • Ours must be one of these, and so the observed fine tuning should be no cause for wonder.

up the cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Then," she wrote, "I had my life before me to take up the cause for those killed.
  • Sturge took up the cause of peace and arbitration being pioneered by Henry Richard.
  • Canadian knights took up the cause earlier, reflecting their earlier entry into the conflict.

just cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The article quotes Tamimi as saying that "fighting those who invade Muslims is a just cause."
  • He replied: 'Caesar did never wrong but with just cause;' and such like, which were ridiculous.
  • The trial ranged widely over whether there was just cause for war and not simply the prisoner issue.

potential to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Lost source accidents have the potential to cause a considerable loss of human life.
  • Widow maker A widow maker is something that has the potential to cause sudden loss of life.
  • This discrepancy between the ideals of the ERG and the ideals of other employees has the potential to cause rifts.

direct cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • An autopsy could not determine a direct cause of death.
  • This new military rule was the direct cause of the Warlord era.
  • Although miticides are not a direct cause of CCD they do play a role in it.

cause pain

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Osteomyelitis (infection of the bone tissue) can also cause pain and limp.
  • These stones cause pain with passage and blockage and have been known to recur.
  • The wounds received from a kamaitachi do not bleed or cause pain, but are deep.

official cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His official cause of death was a cocaine-related heart attack.
  • The official cause of death was "fatty degenerative heart disease".
  • The official cause was never revealed, but fatigue and disorientation may have played a role.

cause during

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Johnson had helped organize Missouri troops for the Union cause during the Civil War.
  • Bristol and Gloucester actively supported the Yorkist cause during the Wars of the Roses.
  • Supporting the Southern cause during the American Civil War, he served in the Confederate States Army.

found to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • More than 115 mutations in PMM2 gene have been found to cause this disease.
  • Epigenetic changes have also been found to cause sex-based differentiation in the brain.
  • Certain viruses such as hepatitis B and human papilloma virus have been found to cause cancer in humans.

sufficient to cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He also showed that myostatin was sufficient to cause a phenotype reminiscent of cachexia.
  • Damage to any of these hippocampal pathways is sufficient to cause some memory disturbance in humans.
  • Autosomal dominant inheritance means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.

unknown cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Palindromic rheumatism is a disease of unknown cause.
  • Those with epilepsy due to an unknown cause have little increased risk.
  • Transient synovitis is a reactive arthritis of the hip of unknown cause.

show cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Aylett was asked to show cause as to why he should not be expelled from the ALP.
  • Judicial review could thus be granted even if show cause proceedings were available.
  • In one case, the Seventh Circuit Court issued an order giving such an attorney "14 days to show cause why he should not be fined $10,000 for his frivolous arguments".

without cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Rapine and pillage were put to stop, and no punishment was inflicted without cause.
  • In early August 2017, Sheri McCoy was “terminated without cause” from her position as Avon CEO.
  • He said that the violence was due to the hostile attitude of whites, who had ravaged Paiute women and killed their men without cause.

not the cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The body is not the cause, but the instrument of sin.
  • This was not the cause, however, of the launch failure that killed seven astronauts.
  • If foreign objects are not the cause, incising and draining the abscess is standard treatment.

only cause

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In general, pressure and chemical environment only cause small changes to fusion ratios.
  • <br> But the opening of the dimensional gates did not only cause damage and destruction.
  • Natural selection will only cause evolution if there is enough genetic variation in a population.

cause many

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Both of them cause many disasters while fighting supervillains.
  • Zero gravity and cosmic rays can cause many implications for astronauts.
  • The law regarding fixtures can also cause many problems with property held under a lease.

cause injury

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is also safer as the tennis ball is soft and less likely to cause injury.
  • It is highly toxic and can cause injury or death upon inhalation, ingestion, or skin exposure.
  • It is highly toxic, and can cause injury or death upon physical contact or inhalation of fumes.

cause further

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • By the 1940s, however, another development was to cause further changes to the CRU's mandate.
  • The effects of soluble salts, biodegradation, and desiccation that cause further deterioration of artifacts are controlled.
  • Similarly, another argued that surface traffic would increase, which would cause further problems to downtown freight transport.
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