Dorotheanthus Dorsally

Dorsal

Meanings and phrases

dorsal

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. facing away from the axis of an organ or organism; abaxial
  2. belonging to or on or near the back or upper surface of an animal or organ or part

dorsal fin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. unpaired median fin on the backs of fishes and some other aquatic vertebrates that help to maintain balance
E.g.
  • The anal fin is larger than the second dorsal fin.
  • The dorsal fin has 10 spines and 14-15 soft rays.
  • The dorsal fin has 13 spines and 13 to 14 soft rays.

dorsal horn

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of the two roots of a spinal nerve that passes dorsally to the spinal cord and that consists of sensory fibers; dorsal root

dorsal root

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of the two roots of a spinal nerve that passes dorsally to the spinal cord and that consists of sensory fibers; dorsal horn

dorsal scapular vein

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vein that is a tributary of the subclavian vein or external jugular vein and accompanies the descending scapular artery; vena scapularis dorsalis

dorsal vertebra

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of 12 vertebrae in the human vertebral column; thoracic vertebrae extend from the seventh cervical vertebra down to the first lumbar vertebra; thoracic vertebra

dorsal sepal

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The dorsal sepal is spatula-shaped, long and wide.

dorsal surface

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Arched hood elevated above dorsal surface.
  • Juveniles are mostly pale blue with a yellow dorsal surface.
  • The dorsal surface is green and is bordered by a bronze stripe.

dorsal fins

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There is no midline ridge between the dorsal fins.
  • The two dorsal fins are almost identical in size.

dorsal side

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its dorsal side is golden-brown, and yellowish-white ventrally.
  • They are silver all over with darker scales on their dorsal side.
  • The dorsal side of the shell is convex or bent, and never depressed.

first dorsal

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first dorsal fin is slightly larger than the second.
  • The pelvic fins are almost as large as the first dorsal fin.
  • There are 6–8 supraocular spines, 11 spines in the first dorsal fin.

dorsal scales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Midbody there are 23 rows of keeled dorsal scales.
  • The smooth dorsal scales are arranged in 15 rows at midbody.
  • The smooth dorsal scales are arranged in 39–53 rows at midbody.

second dorsal

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The anal fin is larger than the second dorsal fin.
  • The second dorsal fin is much smaller than the anal fin.
  • No ridge exists between the first and second dorsal fins.

first dorsal fin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first dorsal fin is slightly larger than the second.
  • The pelvic fins are almost as large as the first dorsal fin.
  • There are 6–8 supraocular spines, 11 spines in the first dorsal fin.

dorsal vertebrae

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its dorsal vertebrae still completely lack these.
  • There were about sixteen dorsal vertebrae.
  • At least some dorsal vertebrae have an elongated centrum, 30% longer than wide.

dorsal and anal

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The bending extends into both dorsal and anal fins.
  • The dorsal and anal fins falcate, the caudal fin is lunate.
  • The soft dorsal and anal fins both have scaly basal sheaths.

dorsal and ventral

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its fur is dark brown on both its dorsal and ventral sides.
  • The spinal nerve is formed from the dorsal and ventral rami.
  • The hindwing has white-centered submarginal spots on both sides, dorsal and ventral.

second dorsal fin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The anal fin is larger than the second dorsal fin.
  • The second dorsal fin is much smaller than the anal fin.
  • The second dorsal fin is relatively large.

dorsal margin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The deeply concave dorsal margin of the opercle also serves to distinguish this genus.
  • The hectocotylus contains a long flap at the ventral margin and a short flap at the dorsal margin.
  • There is no carpal locking mechanism and there are 13 small carpal suckers which form a row along the dorsal margin of the manus.

dorsal stripe

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A black broad dorsal stripe is 2.5 to 6.0 cm in width.
  • Its abdomen is marked with a broad black dorsal stripe extending the whole length.
  • Specimens of "Bipalium adventitium" are characterized by a single dark dorsal stripe.

dorsal spines

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first two dorsal spines are long and flexible.
  • The prickly leather-jacket has two erectile dorsal spines.
  • The most common venom delivery system is via dorsal spines.

dorsal half

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The distal margin of the forewings has a falcate apex and dentate process dividing the more dorsal half.
Wordnet