Familial Familiarisation

Familiar

Meanings and phrases

familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. well known or easily recognized
  2. (usually followed by `with') well informed about or knowing thoroughly; conversant
  3. within normal everyday experience; common and ordinary; not strange
  4. having mutual interests or affections; of established friendship; intimate

familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a friend who is frequently in the company of another; companion; comrade; fellow; associate
  2. a person attached to the household of a high official (as a pope or bishop) who renders service in return for support
  3. a spirit (usually in animal form) that acts as an assistant to a witch or wizard; familiar spirit

familiar spirit

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a spirit (usually in animal form) that acts as an assistant to a witch or wizard; familiar

more familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She was more familiar for stereo comic roles.
  • I feel like my name is a little bit more familiar than it was before.
  • The Sunfish is an anomaly to this more familiar symbiotic relationship.

most familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is the most familiar of the theories of physics.
  • Its most familiar representative is Dominican amber.
  • The largest and most familiar TLD is .com.

became familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He became familiar with death from an early age.
  • Since then, Fung became familiar in the political circle.
  • He became familiar with Lenin’s agitation.

not familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But we're not familiar with that, although we do have delivery boys.
  • Tourists who are not familiar with such high levels of pollution must take extra care.
  • If they were not familiar with each other, Usk at least was familiar with Chaucer's poetry.

become familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is a convenient way for many in the public to become familiar with the medium.
  • A territory-holding beaver will investigate and become familiar with the scents of its neighbors.
  • He said the objective of his visit was to become familiar with the state of Azerbaijani armed forces.

very familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He was also very familiar with Rimbert's work.
  • The Union defenders on Cheat Summit were very familiar with the terrain and mountain trails.
  • Every gendarme owned and was very familiar with the so-called Service Regulations book (Szut.

already familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Co-founder Zuckerman was already familiar with the infrastructure of Ghana.
  • Being already familiar with Malay customs, they were accepted by the Malays living there.
  • This allows for developers already familiar with these engines to create VR content with little to no VR-specific code.

familiar face

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She started to model at the age of 16 and had become a familiar face on the runway in Hanoi.
  • He spent the next 25 years as a familiar face in B-Westerns and mainstream comedies and dramas.
  • She was a familiar face in television broadcasting in Nigeria during the beginning of the industry.

became a familiar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Nhat Ky Cua Me gradually became a familiar song about family love in recent years of the audience.
  • Despite this, Thomas became a familiar radio voice and within Britain was "in every sense a celebrity".
  • Primarily as a character actor, Gordon became a familiar face in numerous feature films and television series.
Wordnet