Flowerpot Flowers-of-an-hour

Flowers

Meanings and phrases

bed of flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a bed in which flowers are growing; flowerbed; flower bed

flowers of zinc

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. oxide of zinc; a white powder used as a pigment or in cosmetics or glass or inks and in zinc ointment; zinc oxide; philosopher's wool; philosophers' wool

white flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The small white flowers form small umbels, across.
  • Many species have large, yellow or white flowers.
  • It produces bright white flowers in the summer.

yellow flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The yellow flowers appear from spring to autumn.
  • Green leaves with yellow flowers and many red spots.
  • It produces showy yellow flowers in the summer.

flowers are white

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The flowers are white with a green strip on each tepal.
  • Leaves are green and the flowers are white.
  • The flowers are white to yellow, in small umbels diameter.

female flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The male and female flowers are small, hard clusters.
  • Male and female flowers grow separate plants.
  • The female flowers are sessile on a catkin.

pink flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its green/ pink flowers are seen from August to November.
  • It produces small hairy pink flowers.
  • It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its showy pink flowers.

purple flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The plants have angled stems and purple flowers.
  • Its pink to purple flowers are seen in August.
  • The inflorescence is a cluster of reddish purple flowers.

flowers are borne

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The tiny flowers are borne in pairs or singly.
  • The flowers are borne singly in leaf axils on a stalk long.
  • The male and female flowers are borne in small, hard clusters.

flowers appear

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The yellow flowers appear from spring to autumn.
  • The flowers appear in the leaf axils.
  • The flowers appear early in spring.

red flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The inflorescence is single group of 3-5 green and red flowers.
  • "miniata" with pink or red flowers.
  • It has dark red flowers with an characteristic and unusual appearance.

flowers are arranged

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The pinkish flowers are arranged in a one-sided spike.
  • Between twenty and sixty green flowers are arranged along a flowering stem tall.
  • From a single to many flowers are arranged in leaf axils or on the ends of the branchlets.

individual flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The tubular perianths of the individual flowers are long.
  • The individual flowers are around long.
  • The individual flowers are up to 25 mm in size, and are pink, red or violet.

male flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The male flowers are small clusters in the leaf axils.
  • "Staminate heads" have all male flowers.
  • The apex of the stem ends in the tassel, an inflorescence of male flowers.

flowers are produced

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The flowers are produced in early spring on catkins 2–3 cm long.
  • Greenish-white to cream flowers are produced in spring and summer.
  • The flowers are produced in terminal flowerheads known as dichasia.

wild flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The meadow is rich in wild flowers.
  • It consists of chalk meadows which provide a habitat for wild flowers, butterflies and birds.
  • Characteristic wild flowers include varieties of mariposa, tulip, and tiger and leopard lilies.

blue flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Up to three blue flowers, wide are borne on a flowering stem tall.
  • Dense panicles of blue flowers are produced in late summer and autumn.
  • There is a cloth border in purple with small blue flowers and green leaves.

fragrant flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The fragrant flowers are pink to light red, tinged with purple.
  • They can produce up to 15 fragrant flowers, blooming from January till April.
  • They are followed by bright yellow fragrant flowers with maroon blotches on the outer petals.

small flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "small flowers" as in the scientific name).
  • The sepals and petals of its small flowers have distinct lengths and shapes.
  • Aganisia produce pseudobulbs and small flowers produced from a creeping rhizome.

green flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It has green flowers in three-rayed umbels.
  • It is a yellow-green shrub with fleshy, succulent leaves and green flowers.
  • I tucked gold and green flowers in my hair and wore a triple strand of pearls".

leaves and flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The dried leaves and flowers have a mild calming effect when smoked.
  • "Myrmecodia" plants produce small, juicy fruits from their one or two leaves and flowers per plant.
  • There is also vegetation rooted in the lake beds with leaves and flowers floating on or emergent from the surface.

cut flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • onion, garlic, leek, asparagus, vanilla), as cut flowers (e.g.
  • Inside you will find more than of fresh cut flowers and potted plants.
  • Indeed, he practically founded the trade in cut flowers on the French Riviera.

bouquet of flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The bomb was concealed in a bouquet of flowers.
  • He paid upfront and requested a room facing the street and a daily bouquet of flowers.
  • Mary Lincoln gave Baker a bouquet of flowers, which he accepted graciously and sadly: "Very beautiful.

many flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its inflorescences are up to long with many flowers, up to across.
  • From a single to many flowers are arranged in leaf axils or on the ends of the branchlets.
  • The singer begins by singing that she is still alive, and that despite her thorns, she also has many flowers.

ray flowers

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The plant does not have ray flowers, only disk florets.
  • A "radiate head" has disc flowers surrounded by ray flowers.
  • Each head usually has 5-36 ray flowers (though sometimes no rays) plus 7–48 disc flowers.

flowers are small

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The male and female flowers are small, hard clusters.
  • The male flowers are small clusters in the leaf axils.
  • The clustered flowers are small, white and fragrant, reddish at the centre.

flowers between

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It mostly flowers between September and November.
  • It mostly flowers between September and December.
  • The species flowers between June and November.

flowers and fruits

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The creeper flowers and fruits from October to May.
  • "Inga thibaudiana" flowers and fruits throughout the year.
  • This species flowers and fruits in July through November in China.

flowers each

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The plant flowers in large inflorescences of up to 65 flowers each.
  • The inflorescence is an array of four to ten flowers each up to long.
  • The pistillate (female) catkins are long, containing 10–30 flowers each.
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