Gnu Go-ahead

Go

Meanings and phrases

go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. functioning correctly and ready for action

go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. street names for methylenedioxymethamphetamine; Adam; ecstasy; XTC; disco biscuit; cristal; X; hug drug
  2. a usually brief attempt; crack; fling; pass; whirl; offer
  3. a time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else); spell; tour; turn
  4. a board game for two players who place counters on a grid; the object is to surround and so capture the opponent's counters; go game

go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; travel; move; locomote
  2. follow a procedure or take a course; proceed; move
  3. move away from a place into another direction; go away; depart
  4. enter or assume a certain state or condition; become; get
  5. be awarded; be allotted
  6. follow a certain course; proceed
  7. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; run; pass; lead; extend
  8. have a particular form; run
  9. be abolished or discarded
  10. be or continue to be in a certain condition
  11. perform as expected when applied; function; work; operate; run
  12. progress by being changed; move; run
  13. to be spent or finished; run low; run short
  14. make a certain noise or sound; sound
  15. pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life; die; decease; perish; exit; pass away; expire; pass; kick the bucket; cash in one's chips; buy the farm; conk; give-up the ghost; drop dead; pop off; choke; croak; snuff it
  16. pass, fare, or elapse; of a certain state of affairs or action
  17. continue to live through hardship or adversity; survive; last; live; live on; endure; hold up; hold out
  18. be in the right place or situation; belong
  19. be ranked or compare
  20. have a turn; make one's move in a game; move
  21. begin or set in motion; start; get going
  22. blend or harmonize; blend; blend in
  23. stop operating or functioning; fail; go bad; give way; die; give out; conk out; break; break down
  24. be the right size or shape; fit correctly or as desired; fit
  25. be contained in
  26. be sounded, played, or expressed
  27. lead, extend, or afford access; lead
  28. be spent
  29. give support (to) or make a choice (of) one out of a group or number; plump
  30. go through in search of something; search through someone's belongings in an unauthorized way; rifle

Go Fish

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a card game for two players who try to assemble books of cards by asking the opponent for particular cards

go Dutch

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. share expenses equally and split the cost of something

go a long way

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. suffice or be adequate for a while or to a certain extent

go about

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. begin to deal with; set about; approach

go across

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. go across or through; pass; go through

go after

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. go after with the intent to catch; chase; chase after; trail; tail; tag; give chase; dog; track
  2. go in search of or hunt for; quest for; quest after; pursue

go against

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. fail to agree with; be in violation of; as of rules or patterns; violate; break
  2. resist; buck
  3. act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promises; transgress; offend; infract; violate; breach; break
E.g.
  • Ieyusu ordered Date Masmune and his allies to go against Uesugi.
  • Marriage is holy, while homosexual acts go against the natural moral law."
  • The Philippine military provided one battalion to go against each subgroup.

go ahead

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. proceed (with a plan of action); plow ahead
E.g.
  • Karamanlis said income-tax cuts will go ahead.
  • I'm going to go ahead, commit and live out a fantasy."
  • Aymer is uncharmed, but preparations go ahead.

go all out

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. perform a task as well as possible; give one's best; do one's best; give full measure

go along

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. cooperate or pretend to cooperate; play along
  2. continue a certain state, condition, or activity; continue; go on; proceed; keep
  3. pass by; elapse; lapse; pass; slip by; glide by; slip away; go by; slide by
E.g.
  • Walking trails go along the property and the river.
  • His opponent's ex-wife asks to go along with him.
  • Jo stays in hospital to go along with the story.

go around

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. be sufficient
  2. become widely known and passed on; spread; circulate
  3. avoid something unpleasant or laborious; bypass; short-circuit; get around
  4. go around the flank of (an opposing army); outflank
  5. turn on or around an axis or a center; revolve; rotate
E.g.
  • I flare up, then I go around apologizing."
  • They also have blue vertical lines that go around their eyes and gills.
  • If I could go around and get rid of all the surviving copies, I would."

go away

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move away from a place into another direction; go; depart
  2. go away from a place; leave; go forth
  3. get lost, as without warning or explanation; disappear; vanish
  4. become invisible or unnoticeable; vanish; disappear
E.g.
  • It was a matter though that wasn't going to go away.
  • It is said that to go away is to die a little.
  • Stork bites on the back of the neck usually do not go away.

go back

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. belong to an earlier time; date back; date from
  2. return in thought or speech to something; recur
  3. regain a former condition after a financial loss; recover; recuperate
E.g.
  • They find Aaron, rescue the girl and go back home.
  • In 2004, he decided to go back to Muay Thai again.
  • Anang then takes his leave to go back to the army.

go back on

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. fail to fulfill a promise or obligation; renege; renege on; renegue on

go bad

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. stop operating or functioning; fail; give way; die; give out; conk out; go; break; break down
  2. become unfit for consumption or use; spoil
v.
  1. get very angry and fly into a rage; flip one's lid; blow up; throw a fit; hit the roof; hit the ceiling; have kittens; have a fit; combust; blow one's stack; fly off the handle; flip one's wig; lose one's temper; blow a fuse

go board

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a board used for playing go

go by

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. pass by; elapse; lapse; pass; slip by; glide by; slip away; slide by; go along
  2. move past; travel by; pass by; surpass; go past; pass
  3. be called; go by a certain name; go under
  4. be or act in accordance with

go deep

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. extend in importance or range; go far

go down

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; descend; fall; come down
  2. go under,; sink; settle; go under
  3. grow smaller; decline; wane
  4. be recorded or remembered
  5. be ingested
  6. be defeated
  7. stop operating; crash
  8. disappear beyond the horizon; set; go under
E.g.
  • This, as expected, did not go down well in Qin.
  • The next day, Ben and Chuck go down in the submarine.
  • They can only go down, and eventually die out.

go down on

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation; fellate; suck; blow

go far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. succeed in a big way; get to the top; arrive; make it; get in
  2. extend in importance or range; go deep
E.g.
  • The problem with Nietzsche, as Derrida sees it, is that he did not go far enough.
  • By 1903, Mickevičius felt that the LDP did not go far enough in its political goals.
  • Some Democrats who voted "no" believed the plan did not go far enough to restore funding.

go for

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. give an affirmative reply to; respond favorably to; accept; consent
  2. be pertinent or relevant or applicable; apply; hold
  3. intend with some possibility of fulfilment; hope
  4. have a fancy or particular liking or desire for; fancy; take to
  5. make an attempt at achieving something; try for

go for broke

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. risk everything in one big effort

go forth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. come out of; issue; emerge; come out; come forth; egress
  2. go away from a place; leave; go away

go forward

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move ahead; travel onward in time or space; proceed; continue
E.g.
  • Otherwise the process cannot go forward.
  • How can we go forward with all this?"
  • Colonel Hill asked four volunteers to go forward and burn the house.

go game

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a board game for two players who place counters on a grid; the object is to surround and so capture the opponent's counters; go

go home

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. return home; head home
E.g.
  • Lola storms out, and the factory workers go home.
  • They return to the time cave, and then go home.
  • The climax definitely lets the viewers go home happy."

go in

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. to come or go into; enter; come in; get into; get in; go into; move into

go into

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. to come or go into; enter; come in; get into; get in; go in; move into
  2. be used or required for

go off

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along; abscond; bolt; absquatulate; decamp; run off; make off
  2. be discharged or activated
  3. go off or discharge; fire; discharge
  4. stop running, functioning, or operating
  5. happen in a particular manner; come off; go over
  6. burst inward; implode
E.g.
  • Then they go off at the same time and even faster.
  • When Buffy and Willow go off to UC-Sunndyale, Amy-Rat goes with them.
  • The audience is upset and starts to boo Puffo, wanting him to go off.
v.
  1. act prematurely or without reflection or too soon; go off half-cocked

go off half-cocked

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. act prematurely or without reflection or too soon; go off at half-cock

go on

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. continue a certain state, condition, or activity; continue; proceed; go along; keep
  2. come to pass; happen; hap; pass off; occur; pass; fall out; come about; take place
  3. move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; advance; progress; pass on; move on; march on
  4. continue talking; he continued,; continue; carry on; proceed
  5. start running, functioning, or operating; come up; come on

go out

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move out of or depart from; exit; get out; leave
  2. leave the house to go somewhere
  3. take the field
  4. become extinguished
  5. go out of fashion; become unfashionable
  6. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; go steady; date; see

go over

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. hold a review (of troops); review; survey
  2. happen in a particular manner; go off; come off
  3. examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition; check; check up on; look into; check out; suss out; check over; check into
  4. fall forward and down; fall over

go past

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move past; travel by; pass by; surpass; go by; pass
  2. be superior or better than some standard; exceed; transcend; overstep; pass; top

go steady

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; go out; date; see

go through

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. go or live through; experience; see
  2. apply thoroughly; think through; work through; run through
  3. eat immoderately; devour; down; consume
  4. pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue; follow through; follow up; follow out; carry out; implement; put through
  5. go across or through; pass; go across
E.g.
  • I'm sure Paul had to go through the same process."
  • from Desur to Gingee also go through Seeyamangalam.
  • Once there, she is compelled to go through with it.
v.
  1. pretend to do something by acting as if one was really doing it

go to

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.; attend

go to bed

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. prepare for sleep; turn in; bed; crawl in; kip down; hit the hay; hit the sack; sack out; go to sleep; retire
E.g.
  • I'd rather go to bed with a sabre-toothed tiger".
  • I see him every night before I go to bed.
  • Woody decides to go to bed early so he can get a head start on quail season the next morning.

go to pieces

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. lose one's emotional or mental composure; fall apart

go to pot

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. become ruined; go to the dogs

go to sleep

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. prepare for sleep; go to bed; turn in; bed; crawl in; kip down; hit the hay; hit the sack; sack out; retire

go to the dogs

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. become ruined; go to pot

go to war

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. commence hostilities; take arms; take up arms
E.g.
  • His father hadn't been conscripted to go to war.
  • I've never said I didn't support a decision to go to war."
  • If we go to war it is with the red flesh.

go under

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. go under,; sink; settle; go down
  2. be called; go by a certain name; go by
  3. disappear beyond the horizon; set; go down

go up

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. move upward; rise; lift; arise; move up; come up; uprise
  2. increase in value or to a higher point; rise; climb
  3. move towards; approach; near; come on; draw near; draw close; come near
  4. go upward with gradual or continuous progress; climb; climb up; mount
  5. be erected, built, or constructed
  6. burn completely; be consumed or destroyed by fire; burn down; burn up
  7. travel up,; ascend
E.g.
  • You would go up to him and say "We have no water".
  • That threshold would go up to 50% by the year 2030.
  • By the 1890s, Maling had decided to go up market.

go with

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. be present or associated with an event or entity; attach to; accompany; come with
  2. go or occur together; collocate with; construe with; cooccur with; co-occur with

go wrong

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. be unsuccessful; fail; miscarry
E.g.
  • With three cuts to choose from, you can't go wrong."
  • Disgusted, her mother stated, "Where did I go wrong?"
  • But it can go wrong, leading to "Vectoral Dystrophy".

have a go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. make an attempt at something; give it a try

have a go at it

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. have sexual intercourse with; sleep together; roll in the hay; love; make out; make love; sleep with; get laid; have sex; know; do it; be intimate; have intercourse; have it away; have it off; screw; fuck; jazz; eff; hump; lie with; bed; bang; get it on; bonk
n.
  1. a game in which a child covers his eyes while the other players hide then tries to find them; hide-and-seek

let go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. release, as from one's grip; let go of; release; relinquish
  2. be relaxed
E.g.
  • As a result, Tremaine was let go by the university.
  • Although he was eventually let go by the school.
  • Samuel Fisk, who had been let go by the First Church.

let go of

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. release, as from one's grip; let go; release; relinquish

let it go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. not act

on the go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. (of a person) very busy and active

sentry go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the duty of serving as a sentry; guard duty; guard; sentry duty

not go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Strike's meeting with Jimmy does not go unnoticed.
  • the old man promises but does not go beyond that.
  • The success of Illinois Steel did not go unchecked.

did not go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The success of Illinois Steel did not go unchecked.
  • The pursuit did not go completely smoothly for Wei.
  • Unfortunately, his tests did not go at all well.

decided to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Shortly afterwards however, he decided to go solo.
  • In 2004, he decided to go back to Muay Thai again.
  • By the 1890s, Maling had decided to go up market.

decides to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • When Mary's mother dies she decides to go travelling.
  • Kazul decides to go home and find out what's happening.
  • Kelly decides to go back to her home in remote farmland.

then go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The presenters would then go on to hold the animal.
  • The four best songs then go on to the "gold final".
  • They then go and fight with someone else's army.

go beyond

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • the old man promises but does not go beyond that.
  • It cannot go beyond its own domain.
  • In doing so, they sought to go beyond the individual to the social.

laps to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • With six laps to go, Dixon slipped by Andretti to take the lead.
  • With four laps to go, the front group had made a gap of 32 seconds.
  • At 65.5 km, with six laps to go, ten riders broke away from the main group.

want to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This sentence means "I want to go to the cinema."
  • I don't want to sing, I don't want to go public.
  • My name's Alf Gibson, and I want to go out with you."

not to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Now, being an adult, he prefers not to go there.
  • Campbell decided not to go back to Utah for the new trials.
  • She chooses not to go through with this.

wanted to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I have always wanted to go into this side of the game.
  • They loved it and wanted to go to contract immediately.
  • exam in 1898 and wanted to go to Madras for his BSc degree.

later go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Molinar and his men later go to question Gredson.
  • He would later go on to become a sculptor.
  • He would later go one to make the USA National Squad in 2012.

go to school

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They were allowed to work and to go to school.
  • They go to school at Highland High located in Highland, Texas.

allowed to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • For the first time Benoît is allowed to go with him.
  • However, they were not allowed to go back to Baltimore.
  • Then the children are allowed to go into the candlelit room.

able to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • all that are able to go forth to war in Israel."
  • How many kids are going to be able to go to college because of this?
  • This new equipment would be able to go and hold at least 78 passengers.

does not go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Strike's meeting with Jimmy does not go unnoticed.
  • the old man promises but does not go beyond that.
  • Only Eurylochus, who suspects treachery, does not go in.

go well

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They can go well with jams, Nutella, and Eurocrem.
  • This second war, too, did not go well for the house of Baux.
  • At first the mission seemed to go well.

minutes to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In appalling heavy rain the game was tied at 22-22 with just minutes to go.
  • The match was a 27-13 loss to Wales, with Strauss subbed off with 9 minutes to go.
  • He came on with 8 minutes to go in the match as the Kings suffered a 12–34 defeat.

forced to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The ship was forced to go back to port to be repaired.
  • He is then forced to go sober for some time.
  • Due to Knox's influence, Section 20 is forced to go dark to stop him.

wants to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Rafterman wants to go into combat, as Joker claims he has.
  • Xavier decides he wants to go travelling and take a gap year.
  • Sriranjini wants to go back to Mukesh.

decide to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Batman, Robin and Batgirl decide to go after Mr.
  • After some thought, the Animorphs decide to go.
  • This bitter experiences make them to decide to go back in hell.

let him go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But she later realises that she has to let him go.
  • The Jets let him go and Tampa Bay brought him back.
  • He tells Sirena to let him go as "it's all over."
E.g.
  • Strike's meeting with Jimmy does not go unnoticed.
  • Their arrival at Augsburg did not go unnoticed.
  • His good performances did not go unnoticed in Europe.

ready to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She concedes to Homer that she is ready to go home now.
  • If you are ready to go, cool."
  • I'm ready to go always."

refused to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • De Jonge heard about the arrest but refused to go into hiding.
  • Emily refused to go with them.
  • However, because Wongang Ami was expecting a child, they refused to go.

going to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was a matter though that wasn't going to go away.
  • She tells Chuck that she's going to go look for Quinn.
  • I'm going to go ahead, commit and live out a fantasy."

go further

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • To go further than just perceiving the object is to recognize the object.
  • OOP concepts go further back but were part of LISP and Simula language science.
  • , electric tram-trains run up to Benidorm, and diesel trains go further to Dénia.

go to college

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She was the first person in her family to go to college.
  • In one episode, he decides to go to college.
  • Harding attended Miss Porter's School but did not go to college.

go to work

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Economic circumstances forced him to go to work at a tannery.
  • He left school at 13 to go to work.
  • Butler's imagination, he may want to go to work for Walt Disney."

used to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The wife of the count of Carrù used to go hunting.
  • Some cowherds from nearby villages used to go there.
  • We used to go there and get stung by wasps.

way to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She said that Tameike showed her the way to go.
  • The servants, not knowing which way to go, turned back.
  • It just shows that it's a bad way to go."
E.g.
  • He should go straight to the stable and take the horse.
  • He'll probably go straight for the Guineas."
  • Tom says that's not his dream, so he wants to go straight to the pizzeria.

go towards

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • These funds go towards the expansion of the trail system.
  • The connector was modified to only go towards the Circle.
  • = Fought as an alternate bout, does not go towards team record.

come and go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • That allowed the boats to come and go at any time.
  • She would come and go, ascending and descending.
  • His now-twin personnas come and go at random.
E.g.
  • All donations from the sets go directly to War Child Canada.
  • 100% of listener donations go directly to the chosen charity.
  • The remaining two pairs will go directly into the danger zone.

people go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A lot of people go through that sort of thing.
  • Some people go to Wikipedia for the fun of seeking a rabbit hole.
  • It is estimated that 2 million people go to Copacabana Beach to see the spectacle.

agrees to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Norris agrees to go on a cottage holiday with Mary.
  • They grab Sweetiepie, who finally agrees to go with them.
  • Ross agrees to go into care and Morag offers to go with him.
E.g.
  • Many potential bidders emerged; but the sale did not go through.
  • The sale did not go through.

go outside

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He wants to marry her but dare not go outside.
  • Alex then suggested that they go outside.
  • "We've been told not to go outside.

all go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "We all go through challenges.
  • all go to show the range of Frère's fondness for all book related subjects.
  • Michael says he does not feel guilty and they must all go on with their lives.

did go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He did go on one tour, to North America, in 1879.
  • He wanted to portray himself and he did go and make his own movie later on.
  • This work, however, did go on to influence the prayer books of many British colonies.

only go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The rest of the track trains can only go 10 mph.
  • They can only go down, and eventually die out.
  • The connector was modified to only go towards the Circle.

let her go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Kim convinces him to let her go and he agrees.
  • To avoid her death, Apollo turned her into a nymph and let her go.
  • While Vakil Singh agrees to let her go, Lakhna revolts and disagrees.

often go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • As mentioned, they often go fishing as well.
  • The relevant theoretical processes often go by the name "intuition".
  • The leading horses from the race often go on to compete in the Prix du Bois.

not go well

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This second war, too, did not go well for the house of Baux.
  • His time in the BTCC did not go well.
  • All did not go well on the playing field for the American team.

go so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "It didn't go so well", Meredith Blake of the "LA Times" reported.
  • But that can only go so far.
  • Cassie suggests that she does not know where to go so Jack offers her a lift.

go as far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Northbound trains go as far as Kenosha, Wisconsin.
  • Once he said to go as far as we could, it became great fun to write."
  • Records of slavery in Ancient Greece go as far back as Mycenaean Greece.

things go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • When things go wrong, they need to fix the damage they've caused.
  • However, things go complicated as the deal goes sour between the two.
  • "It's so frustrating to come out and have so many things go wrong," Cox said.
E.g.
  • 98% of students go on to pursue a college education.
  • The questions gradually get harder as the students go on.
  • For basic education (up to 5th) students go to Singarpur and Patrahi.

go abroad

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Edward felt it prudent to go abroad for some years.
  • Yearly approximately 150 students of VAMK go abroad.
  • As a result of harassment he began efforts to go abroad.

go before

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Two of his ministers go before him making the sound of trumpets.
  • "big storms", but in Caesar about 95% of examples go before the noun.
  • As of this writing, the bill still must go before the House for a vote.

go without

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • These techniques did not go without results.
  • To this the Queen replied: 'The children won't go without me.
  • Can you go without water?
E.g.
  • I've never said I didn't support a decision to go to war."
  • CBH's decision to go to tender was influenced by greater competition.
  • In his first two years with the Aces, Alaska's decision to go "younger" paid off.

letting go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The song delivers the message of letting go.
  • The video ends with her letting go of the necklace he gave her.
  • It's about letting go."

chose to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He chose to go for Christmas holiday in Switzerland.
  • Nick chose to go with the group instead.
  • Belasco and de Mille chose to go their separate ways by 1891.

go public

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I don't want to sing, I don't want to go public.
  • In 1970, Family Dollar decided to go public on the stock exchange.
  • Murrow considered resigning, and while he did not go public with the issue, others did.
E.g.
  • Belasco and de Mille chose to go their separate ways by 1891.
  • The two work together to escape, but soon go their separate ways.
  • He and his partner Ben Bailey split up and go their separate ways.
E.g.
  • and death threats forced Bhatti to go into hiding.
  • He advised the Jews of Athens to flee or go into hiding.
  • De Jonge heard about the arrest but refused to go into hiding.

go all

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Roosevelt concurred and told them to "go all out for Truman".
  • It was speculated the cave could go all the way to Benham Falls.
  • Daniel Jr. at six was the youngest person to go all the way with the Mormon Battalion.

just go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • We perform with our hearts and just go in.
  • Meanwhile, Walker goes AWOL, to see Renée, just go a night.
  • As soon as the heat gets too great, just go bankrupt and get out.

refuses to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His wife Elinor (Doris Lloyd) refuses to go with him.
  • Sport finds Jeb at Aunt T's but he refuses to go back.
  • She refuses to go back but feels very unhappy.

willing to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The deal was: would I be willing to go to Mexico?...
  • Venetian nobles were not willing to go to this island.
  • When the fighting concluded, neither universe was willing to go.
E.g.
  • But I didn't want to go anywhere else.
  • Its motto is: "We will go anywhere.
  • A. Thomson wrote that Winchilsea "would go anywhere for a game of cricket".

go free

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I call on ALL of Russia to let Pussy Riot go free."
  • Wolf decides to let Jack go free after Jack saves his life.
  • He demanded and received hostages and money and let them go free.

never go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This probably prompted his decision to never go into a mine again.
  • Red Auerbach hated it and said the Celtics would never go along with it.
  • He was saying that basically he was my example to never go down that road."
E.g.
  • Strike's meeting with Jimmy does not go unnoticed.
  • Their arrival at Augsburg did not go unnoticed.
  • His good performances did not go unnoticed in Europe.

plans to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They make plans to go out again and then begin kissing.
  • The band plans to go on tour later this year.
  • She plans to go to university after modeling.

go on tour

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Additionally, they go on tour approximately bi-yearly.
  • The band plans to go on tour later this year.
  • In 1931, the band became the first Opry band to go on tour.

left to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Sally then returns to the house, having left to go to the store.
  • (Note the past tense: "la" (shienga la) 'our class monitor has left to go home.'
  • The player is feeling pretty confident by now since there is only one opponent left to go.
E.g.
  • The United States followed with its own prohibition, to go into effect in 1808.
  • To go into effect, it would have to be approved by the New York State Legislature.
  • These new regulations go into effect 15 months after publication in the Federal Register.

go into exile

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The democratic leaders were permitted to go into exile.
  • Acts of aggression can become so intense that targeted dolphins sometimes go into exile after losing a fight.
  • Early in 1189, the emperor gave Henry the Lion a choice to accompany him on the Third Crusade or go into exile.
E.g.
  • The cars eventually go on a side road.
  • While it did eventually go Gold, personal problems within the band emerged.
  • The album continued the trend of growing sales, and would eventually go gold.

time to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I have done my share; it is time to go.
  • I realized that was the time to go'."
  • He is released just in time to go back on the plane with Sybil.

having to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Even though, approximately 500 people are having to go to work outside of the village.
  • At 08:00 that night, Porky sets the alarm clock as Gabby complains about having to go to bed early.
  • Bringing Persiba back to the highest caste, without having to go through four changes to the chairman.

unable to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • We have been unable to go in for care-free rejoicing.
  • It was unable to go ahead due to flooding.
  • The Doctor is unable to go back to get him, due to the paradox.

go inside

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Bulletman and Bulletgirl go inside the shack.
  • Val and Doc go inside and subdue the men.
  • The inside of the pagoda is solid, and one can not go inside.
E.g.
  • The film is planned to go into production in 2018.
  • Hy-wire did not go into production.
  • Francis stated that the show was set to go into production in January 2015.

go onto

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His second daughter Eleanor Allardyce would go onto marry Archibald Kennedy, Earl of Cassilis.
  • Bluebell United would go onto retain the title again the following year in the 2015-16 season.
  • Stade Français would then go onto spend over fifty years in the lower divisions of French rugby.

seconds to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Boston College then took possession at its own 22-yard line with 28 seconds to go.
  • This game was also close, and was tied at 82 points each with six seconds to go in the game.
  • The Knights defense forced a three-and-out, and got one last possession with 35 seconds to go.
E.g.
  • Funding was expected to go towards investing in new personnel and technology.
  • In these cultures, men are also expected to go through various rites of passage.
  • All Hidayatullah cadres are expected to go out preaching to the general public every Saturday.

go see

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Skipper and Gilligan go see Mary Ann.
  • He and Dubbie go see him in Virginia.
  • You have to go see all that shit.

not go ahead

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • These invasion plans also did not go ahead.
  • The race did not go ahead and was not included in the 2014 calendar.
  • Construction of the prototype did not go ahead, but the plans were retained.
E.g.
  • The kits are somewhat simplified but go together well.
  • Love and faith go together like body and soul.
  • Firefly also tends to go together with Black Out and Munitia as H.I.S.S.

place to go

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They wanted to stay in Las Vegas, so the Thomas & Mack Center was the place to go.
  • If you want a top notch inclusive comprehensive education, this is the place to go."
  • John Eudes founded the Order of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge to give reformed prostitutes a place to go.
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