Harlow Harmattan

Harm

Meanings and phrases

harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.; injury; hurt; trauma
  2. the occurrence of a change for the worse; damage; impairment
  3. the act of damaging something or someone; damage; hurt; scathe

harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. cause or do harm to
n.
  1. street names for gamma hydroxybutyrate; soap; scoop; max; liquid ecstasy; goop; Georgia home boy; easy lay
E.g.
  • He was charged with assault causing grievous bodily harm.
  • In October 2018 he was charged with grievous bodily harm and assault.
  • In normal parlance, the initials "GBH" refer to the criminal charge of grievous bodily harm (i.e.

bodily harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A person cannot consent to serious bodily harm.
  • The soldiers threatened bodily harm to the Bodyguards.
  • He was charged with assault causing grievous bodily harm.

no harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They are more like kites than airplanes, so no harm done.
  • - He has done me no harm" before closing the door on them.
  • Besides, there is no harm trying."

not harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He released Ajatasattu and did not harm him.
  • He threatens her but does not harm her.
  • Anytus and Meletus may indeed kill me, but they cannot harm me.

cause harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Use during pregnancy can cause harm to the baby.
  • It may cause harm to the baby if taken during pregnancy or breastfeeding.
  • Certain sunscreen ingredients can cause harm if they penetrate the skin over time.

more harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The stigma associated with mental health disorders may do more harm than good.
  • They had given the land to the settlers and did not wish to inflict more harm on them.
  • But she tends to believe the best in people, a belief that seems to do her more harm than good.

physical harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The blade-like leaves may cause physical harm to the birds who feed off of it.
  • These deter predators by causing physical harm when the predator comes into contact with the spicules.
  • Because of the constant threat of physical harm, all citizens are allowed to own and openly carry firearms in public.

harm reduction

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • MAPS offers educational resources that actively promote psychedelic harm reduction.
  • MAPS has also formed a partnership with Bluelight, a web forum dedicated to harm reduction.
  • These compounds may be resistant to harm reduction counter measures such as the antidote Naloxone.

harm than good

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The stigma associated with mental health disorders may do more harm than good.
  • But she tends to believe the best in people, a belief that seems to do her more harm than good.
  • At the time, many oncologists believed such an approach was too toxic and would do more harm than good.

serious harm

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This can cause serious harm to the species that drink the water.
  • They can be dangerous and are able to cause serious harm and injury to humans and livestock.
  • Hence, labeling either habitual criminals or those who have caused serious harm as "criminals" is not constructive.

harm caused

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 4 attached to the owner of contiguous land the liability for harm caused by defects of cleaning.
  • Manu contends that the punishment should be commensurate with that of the harm caused to the victim.
  • Advocates argue that low-skilled attackers can use this information to perform sophisticated attacks that would otherwise be beyond their ability, and the potential benefit does not outweigh the potential harm caused by malevolent actors.
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