Homeland Homelessness

Homeless

Meanings and phrases

homeless

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. physically or spiritually homeless or deprived of security; - James Stern; dispossessed; roofless
  2. without nationality or citizenship; stateless

homeless

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. someone unfortunate without housing; homeless person
  2. poor people who unfortunately do not have a home to live in

homeless person

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. someone unfortunate without housing; homeless

homeless people

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The homeless people fled to the protection of the British at Fort Niagara.
  • The men then walk way in the woods while shots of homeless people are interspersed.
  • Due to the vast influx of homeless people, the creation of Hoovervilles took place.

left homeless

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Families were left homeless and lost everything.
  • Following the storm, roughly 350 people were left homeless.
  • More than 100,000 persons were left homeless by the disaster.

homeless man

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Jack Cracker is a homeless man who lives in the swamp.
  • It can also mean a tramp or homeless man.
  • However, when he passes out drunk, a homeless man steals his belongings.

homeless shelter

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A work lieutenant tortured those at the homeless shelter.
  • "The Reverend" Shepherd, who runs the local homeless shelter.
  • The leftover food is often donated to a local homeless shelter.

people homeless

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In Mahajanga, rising waters left 463 people homeless.
  • On 22 October 1956, another fire made a further 2,000 people homeless.
  • Throughout the country, the storm destroyed 186 homes and left 700 people homeless.

homeless shelters

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In 1997, several of AVAM's few full-time employees were hired directly from local homeless shelters.
  • Sometimes groups will crochet for a specific charity purpose, such as crocheting for homeless shelters, nursing homes, etc.
  • The company had also coordinate services to foster programs, group homes, homeless shelters, and mental health facilities by late 2003.

homeless population

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Her work began with tutoring homeless children in Santa Monica Park as a response to a rising homeless population.
  • The efforts made by the community to create and maintain space for the homeless population in Berkeley did not stop there.
  • The underground homeless population has been coming into contact with these by-products, turning them into the mutated creatures.

homeless children

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She also meets the homeless children that he treats like slaves.
  • Her work began with tutoring homeless children in Santa Monica Park as a response to a rising homeless population.
  • After Gaspard is arrested and jailed, Remi reunites with her real family, and Milligan decides to adopt the homeless children.

homeless men

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This became Simon House, for homeless men.
  • For the last twenty years, she has Chaired a shelter for twelve homeless men and women.
  • The most notable speaker was Percy Crawford who spoke consistently to the crowd of homeless men.

made homeless

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Priests made homeless were taken in by parishioners.
  • As a result, 6,000 people died and over a million were missing or made homeless.
  • Hundreds of buildings were toppled and many thousands of people were made homeless.

homeless youth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Zachary Bonner is a homeless youth advocate.
  • Sage wrote an editorial about homeless youth in New York City for the The Morton Report .
  • She is a Guggenheim Fellow, Pulitzer Prize nominee, and formerly incarcerated and homeless youth.
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