Locomotive Locomotor

Locomotives

Meanings and phrases

steam locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The railway relies on its fleet of steam locomotives.
  • In 1845, production of steam locomotives began.
  • Most Sundays, one of the steam locomotives is operated.

diesel locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The LMS diesel locomotives had engines of only .
  • Most use both steam and diesel locomotives for haulage.
  • The railroad operates diesel locomotives on the whole line.

electric locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They are part of the large 1980s family of 144 electric locomotives.
  • Freight trains were hauled by electric locomotives until March 1998.
  • Diesel and electric locomotives have gradually replaced steam locomotives.

class locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • By 1943, X class locomotives were each averaging per annum.
  • Most were scrapped and their boilers fitted to F class locomotives.
  • The frames were stored and the boilers used as spares for the N and U class locomotives.

locomotives built

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Electric locomotives built by CEMSA included:
  • These modifications were used in all future locomotives built by EMD.
  • The locomotives built before the 1870s were given names as well as numbers.

locomotives were built

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The four locomotives were built in 1904 by the firm of Borsig.
  • Some locomotives were built in-house.
  • Five NC locomotives were built.

tank locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Class 699.1 was a rebuild of the engines into tank locomotives.
  • The three tank locomotives had an outer frame and a "Klose" drive.
  • In the beginning two Bavarian D X tank locomotives worked the line.

new locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The new locomotives cost around 400 million yen each.
  • These new locomotives are generally referred to as the Rover class.
  • The new locomotives were numbered 172–190 (renumbered 2972–2990 in 1912).

passenger locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was typical of the passenger locomotives of the time.
  • It could fairly be said that the overall styling influenced passenger locomotives around the world.

locomotives used

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The locomotives used saturated steam and compound expansion.
  • In locomotives used for mineral traffic the advantages seem to have been marginal.
  • The locomotives used were: The extras on board the St Trinian's train were pupils from a local convent school.

tender locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They were 0-8-0 tender locomotives with two outside cylinders.
  • The genesis of the class was in the four earlier Class D 0-8-0 tender locomotives.
  • The decision was taken to rebuild them into more conventional 4-6-0 tender locomotives.

locomotives were delivered

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Seven locomotives were delivered in 2013.
  • 12 locomotives were delivered by Hanomag between 1898 and 1901.
  • The locomotives were delivered between 1861 and 1866 and entered service on the Porrettana railway.

locomotives and rolling

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • RMNE has an extensive collection of locomotives and rolling stock of New England heritage, with over 80 pieces of full-sized railroad equipment.
  • Greig & Beadon's Patent Light Railway Greig & Beadon's Patent Light Railway was a patented system of narrow gauge locomotives and rolling stock.
  • A. E. Goodwin AE Goodwin was an Australian heavy engineering firm, which produced railway locomotives and rolling stock, as well as roadmaking machinery at its factory in Auburn.

locomotives were used

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • After the war, Class 20 steam locomotives were used on the line.
  • Two classes of tank locomotives were used in the United Kingdom, both built for hump shunting.
  • These locomotives were used above all on lines with steep inclines in the Black Forest and the Odenwald.

gauge locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Some of the narrow gauge locomotives were fifty or more years old, and the rolling stock not much the younger.
  • The one area where the type proved to be useful was on broad gauge locomotives, where sharp bends were less of an issue.
  • Grand Trunk purchased 200 standard gauge locomotives (including 62 from Portland Company) and converted 135 old locomotives.

railway locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • By 1922, the OFM factory was only producing railway locomotives and similar rolling stock parts.
  • Beugniot designed a system for articulating the driving axles of railway locomotives, known as the Beugniot lever.
  • Although mostly used for static steam plants, some were used in early steam vehicles, railway locomotives and ships.

locomotives operated

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Prussian T 37 The Prussian T 37s were German steam locomotives operated by the Prussian state railways.
  • Saxon V The Saxon Class Vs were German, six-coupled, goods train, tender locomotives operated by the Royal Saxon State Railways.
  • Seibu Class E851 The was a class of four DC electric locomotives operated by the private railway operator Seibu Railway in Japan between 1969 and 1996.

locomotives designed

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Radial axles were also used in locomotives designed by F.W.
  • The Armstrong Class were a group of four locomotives designed by William Dean and built in 1894 with driving wheels.
  • 1 to 4 (or Baden C) were six-wheeled, narrow gauge, tank locomotives designed for the metre gauge line from Mosbach to Mudau.

shunting locomotives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • An exception was shunting locomotives (switchers).
  • Acton has had a number of shunting locomotives over the years.
  • British shunting locomotives were rarely fitted with superheaters.
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