Memorizer Memphis

Memory

Meanings and phrases

memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. something that is remembered
  2. the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered; remembering
  3. the power of retaining and recalling past experience; retention; retentiveness; retentivity
  4. an electronic memory device; computer memory; storage; computer storage; store; memory board
  5. the area of cognitive psychology that studies memory processes

by memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. by committing to memory; by heart

committal to memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. learning so as to be able to remember verbatim; memorization; memorisation

compact disc read-only memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a compact disk that is used with a computer (rather than with an audio system); a large amount of digital information can be stored and accessed but it cannot be altered by the user; CD-ROM

computer memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an electronic memory device; memory; storage; computer storage; store; memory board
E.g.
  • Calculators also have the ability to store numbers into computer memory.
  • The instructions to be executed are kept in some kind of computer memory.
  • Early computer buses were bundles of wire that attached computer memory and peripherals.

computer memory unit

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a unit for measuring computer memory

core memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) a computer memory consisting of an array of magnetic cores; now superseded by semiconductor memories; magnetic core memory
E.g.
  • By 1954, those unreliable methods were mostly replaced by magnetic core memory.
  • It featured a nixie tubes display and had transistor electronics and ferrite core memory.
  • Additional core memory beyond 4 KW can be used to allow for additional symbol table entries.

episodic memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. memory for episodes in your own life; personal memory
E.g.
  • Destination memory plays a critical role in our episodic memory.
  • In 2015, a study was published about zebrafishes' capacity for episodic memory.
  • Similar improvements have been reported for other cognitions such as semantic and episodic memory.

erasable programmable read-only memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) a read-only memory chip that can be erased by ultraviolet light and programmed again with new data; EPROM

flash memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. nonvolatile storage that can be electrically erased and programmed anew
E.g.
  • Toshiba commercialized NAND flash memory in 1987.
  • This includes some flash memory, like EEPROMs.

immediate memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. what you can repeat immediately after perceiving it; short-term memory; STM

long-term memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. your general store of remembered information; LTM

magnetic bubble memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a nonvolatile storage device that holds information in the form of bubbles on a thin film of magnetic silicate; no longer used in most computers

magnetic core memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) a computer memory consisting of an array of magnetic cores; now superseded by semiconductor memories; core memory

memory access

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) the operation of reading or writing stored information; access
E.g.
  • This results in slightly reduced memory access speed.
  • A usual solution preserves copies of registers until a memory access completes.
  • JPEG), S3TC's fixed-rate data compression coupled with the single memory access (cf.

memory board

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an electronic memory device; memory; computer memory; storage; computer storage; store

memory cache

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) RAM memory that is set aside as a specialized buffer storage that is continually updated; used to optimize data transfers between system elements with different characteristics; cache

memory chip

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a RAM microchip that can be plugged into a computer to provide additional memory

memory device

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a device that preserves information for retrieval; storage device

memory image

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a mental image of something previously experienced

memory loss

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. partial or total loss of memory; amnesia; blackout
E.g.
  • I still suffer a little from short-term memory loss.
  • Suffering from a memory loss, Tatsumaru kills Shiunsai.
  • She managed to overcome it with a minimum of memory loss.

memory picture

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a memory image that is similar to a visual perception

memory trace

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a postulated biochemical change (presumably in neural tissue) that represents a memory; engram

motor memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. your memory for motor skills; muscle memory

muscle memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. your memory for motor skills; motor memory

personal memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. memory for episodes in your own life; episodic memory

random access memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the most common computer memory which can be used by programs to perform necessary tasks while the computer is on; an integrated circuit memory chip allows information to be stored or accessed in any order and all storage locations are equally accessible; random-access memory; random memory; RAM; read/write memory

random memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the most common computer memory which can be used by programs to perform necessary tasks while the computer is on; an integrated circuit memory chip allows information to be stored or accessed in any order and all storage locations are equally accessible; random-access memory; random access memory; RAM; read/write memory

random-access memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the most common computer memory which can be used by programs to perform necessary tasks while the computer is on; an integrated circuit memory chip allows information to be stored or accessed in any order and all storage locations are equally accessible; random access memory; random memory; RAM; read/write memory

read-only memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) memory whose contents can be accessed and read but cannot be changed; ROM; read-only storage; fixed storage

read-only memory chip

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a memory chip providing read-only memory

read/write memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the most common computer memory which can be used by programs to perform necessary tasks while the computer is on; an integrated circuit memory chip allows information to be stored or accessed in any order and all storage locations are equally accessible; random-access memory; random access memory; random memory; RAM
n.
  1. recall that is hypothesized to work by storing abstract features which are then used to construct the memory during recall; reconstruction

reproductive memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. recall that is hypothesized to work by storing the original stimulus input and reproducing it during recall; reproduction

screen memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an imagined memory of a childhood experience; hides another memory of distressing significance

semantic memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. your memory for meanings and general (impersonal) facts

short-term memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. what you can repeat immediately after perceiving it; STM; immediate memory

virtual memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (computer science) memory created by using the hard disk to simulate additional random-access memory; the addressable storage space available to the user of a computer system in which virtual addresses are mapped into real addresses; virtual storage
E.g.
  • Segments may also be used to implement virtual memory.
  • Protected memory systems almost always include virtual memory as well.
  • In this way, sequential pages in virtual memory do not contend for the same cache line.

working memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. memory for intermediate results that must be held during thinking
E.g.
  • Many models of working memory have been made.
  • Cognitive psychologists often study memory in terms of working memory.
  • One of the most regarded is the Baddeley and Hitch model of working memory.

no memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He also stated that he had no memory of the crash.
  • Carrie has no memory of sending Will the texts.
  • The daughter had no memory of the incident.

main memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A valid page is one that currently resides in main memory.
  • CPU registers), acted on, and then written back to main memory.
  • Therefore, the CPU might stall when it must access main memory directly.

named in memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They had a son Paul and a daughter Eileen, named in memory of Ruth's sister.
  • The Lecture is named in memory of the eminent electrical engineer Bernard Price.
  • The street is named in memory of the 1850 Battle of Isted in the First Schleswig War.

memory card

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Inside the compartment he finds a memory card.
  • SuperNova series and white cabinets didn't support memory card slots.
  • An adapter for other memory card types is also available as an accessory.

recent memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Gungorogone were composed of 5 clans in recent memory.
  • Pat King of "Metro" named it "one of the catchiest songs in recent memory about outrunning the cops".
  • "GameSpot" gave the game a score of 8.5/10, calling it "one of the most terrifying games in recent memory".

memory management

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Instead, region-based memory management is used throughout.
  • Ada's dynamic memory management is high-level and type-safe.
  • Moreover, segmentation is more of user's end of memory management scheme.

collective memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • News coverage can also shape collective memory in retrospect.
  • The Civil War is one of the central events in American collective memory.
  • They both depend on the collective memory shared by both proponents and the audience.

learning and memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Her research focused on learning and memory in pre-verbal infants.
  • Another plasticity-related gene involved in learning and memory is Arc/Arg3.1.
  • This ability for dendritic growth is thought to play a role in learning and memory formation.

shared memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Systems could include up to 32 processors with up to 512 shared memory buses.
  • Figure (c) shows a parallel system in which each processor has a direct access to a shared memory.
  • Doors can be used to synchronize access to shared memory segments, allowing single-copy data transfer.

memory cards

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • However, many memory cards do not have a CIS.
  • Some machines have the ports to insert PlayStation memory cards.
  • Pre-recorded phrases are stored on Secure Digital flash memory cards.

internal memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Appeal more to internal memory and conception.
  • All pseudo-random number generators have an internal memory or state.
  • The internal memory and optional MicroSD card slot makes it ideal for listening to music on the go.

memory address

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Depending on the context, the word was treated either as an integer or a memory address.
  • The memory address was increased from 15 to 18 bits, for a theoretical maximum memory size of 256k words.
  • When a program references a memory location the offset is translated to a memory address using the page table.

living memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There was a level of peace in the kingdom unknown in living memory.
  • The disasters of civil war were still fresh in living memory from the Wars of the Roses.
  • The United Nations described the flood, the worst to occur in the living memory of Bihar.

memory system

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The 320 and 540 use a Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) memory system.
  • In MT, the execution units and the memory system including the caches are shared among multiple threads.
  • The 840, first offered in 1973, also included a new paged memory system allowing for addresses of up to 17-bits.

memory location

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • If each memory location holds one byte, the addressable memory space is 4 GB.
  • JMP 0,3 Jump to the memory location whose address is contained in accumulator 3.
  • A number of banks of RAM are provided, but are not permanently assigned to a memory location.

memory capacity

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The memory capacity was up to 10 6 knocks.
  • We do not yet know the practical limit of long-term memory capacity.
  • To increase memory capacity and bandwidth, chips are combined on a module.

memory space

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • (They had their own memory space.
  • If each memory location holds one byte, the addressable memory space is 4 GB.
  • In order to save time and memory space, much of the functionality of Emacs loads only when required.

memory controller

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The memory controller provides support for DDR and DDR2 SDRAMs.
  • The basic 6100 was later upgraded to the 6120, with the 6102 memory controller built-in.
  • The zEC12 chip has on board multi-channel DDR3 RAM memory controller supporting a RAID like configuration to recover from memory faults.

physical memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The MC68000 can address 16 MB of physical memory.
  • The page table maps logical memory to physical memory.
  • Virtual memory is a system where all physical memory is controlled by the operating system.

term memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Her research in long term memory is widely cited in psychology.
  • Firth has a learning difficulty that causes short term memory loss.
  • BDNF is critical to long term memory formation and the upkeep of neurons.

video memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • WPF supports aggressive caching of pre-rendered ClearType text in video memory.
  • The list price for a machine with an hard drive, main memory, and of video memory was $2,949 USD.
  • The video memory could be banked out, so that the entire 64K address space could be used for main memory.

more memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Li'l Bit has one more memory to share: the summer of 1962.
  • An "extended 80-column card" with more memory increased the machine's RAM to 128 kB.
  • This method requires more memory than a line list but supplies the user with considerably more information.

honor the memory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This organization continues to honor the memory of the mine disaster.
  • Since 1960, Romanies from Tarnów have been coming to the region to honor the memory of the victims.
  • This lecture series was made possible by a generous grant from Schlumberger to honor the memory of Dijkstra.
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