Mubarak Muchness

Much

Meanings and phrases

much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. (quantifier used with mass nouns) great in quantity or degree or extent

much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a great degree or extent
  2. very
  3. to a very great degree or extent; a lot; lots; a good deal; a great deal; very much
  4. (degree adverb used before a noun phrase) for all practical purposes but not completely; practically
  5. frequently or in great quantities; a great deal; often

much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a great amount or extent

as much as possible

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a feasible extent; as far as possible

much as

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in a similar way; very much like

pretty much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to some degree
E.g.
  • It's pretty much the only cop show that I would do."
  • Otherwise the story is pretty much of a downhill run."
  • Everything I'm doing pretty much in the activist scene.

that much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a certain degree

too much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. more than necessary; overmuch
E.g.
  • Or did he simply drink too much and crash his car?
  • Opponents of the bill said it would cost too much.
  • In that, "High Crimes" is too much like real life.

very much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a very great degree or extent; a lot; lots; a good deal; a great deal; much
E.g.
  • We're very much interested in the ambiguity of it.
  • However, this is very much an unearned reputation.
  • He is very much admired by pupils and associates."

very much like

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in a similar way; much as

much more

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • RAM was now much more simply upgradable via SIMMs.
  • Other forms of color blindness are much more rare.
  • This stimulates a much more robust immune response.

so much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I don't care so much what the papers say about me.
  • His showmanship adds so much flair to a live gig."
  • there was so much to enjoy in "The Last Weekend".

how much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Everyone notices how much Jason looks like Marvin.
  • Tina tells Dom how much she loves him before dying.
  • She had not known how much a part of him she was.

much larger

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Female is much larger and more robust than the male.
  • Cave 24 is like Cave 21, unfinished but much larger.
  • Enzymes are usually much larger than their substrates.

much less

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This recapture is much less popular than 4...dxc6.
  • The gas conducts heat much less than the solids.
  • From the 13th century they are much less common.

much smaller

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The much smaller West End branch remained closed.
  • Crossbows have a much smaller draw length than bows.
  • The fins were made much smaller and triangular.

spent much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He spent much of his career in North West England.
  • The band spent much of their time touring Scotland.
  • He spent much of his time learning to play music.

much higher

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • have much higher margins than wholesale groceries.
  • Turnout here was much higher than previous elections.
  • Although other studies have shown much higher figures.

much better

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The play is dreadful, and Avice is not much better.
  • Those I knew were much better assassins than soldiers.
  • executed the storyline "much better" than the film did.

not much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There's really not much I found to dislike at all.
  • Otherwise, for all its charm, it's not much use.".
  • It is thought to be not much later than A.D. 1200.

much time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At 3–2, Verdasco was warned for taking too much time.
  • when White loses too much time with the queen.
  • She kept the promise and spent much time in Bratislava.

much lower

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This results in a much lower overall gear ratio.
  • Normal conservation water levels are much lower, at .
  • Unlike ordinary concrete, CLSM has much lower strength.

much later

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is thought to be not much later than A.D. 1200.
  • Gallitzin wrote of this experience much later, around 1839.
  • The dedication of the reredos came much later on 23 July 1911.

much longer

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Their journey had been much longer than expected.
  • It was much longer than the poorly known "Trossulus".
  • The second "Scudetto" did not elude Roma for much longer.

much greater

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was revived in 1942 at a much greater scale.
  • After the event his skill is shown to be much greater.
  • The mass of Eris can be calculated with much greater precision.

much the same

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Other stations across the country did much the same.
  • Fungi have been engineered with much the same goals.
  • They then elect another Tyrant, who is much the same.

much attention

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The outfits worn during initiation require much attention.
  • His "Observations of a Solicitor" attracted much attention.
  • Their controversy attracted much attention among Freemasons.

much so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • So much so they added fireworks in 2015-16 celebration.
  • So much so that, in early 1960, Harlan quit.
  • He was uncompromising on his principles, perhaps too much so.

much older

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Countess Theresa was married to a much older count.
  • A much older form of portable toilet chemical is lye.
  • The geology of the area is much older however.

not so much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "[T]he debate was not so much about Mary as about Jesus.
  • Some people love him, others not so much.
  • Mrs. Clinton has a lot of experience; Ms. Palin, not so much.

did much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Other stations across the country did much the same.
  • King Charles ll did much to foster the rebuilding work.
  • He did much other work for the Jewish People.

much success

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He never had much success with girls since childhood.
  • The rock band Tamouz gained much success in the 1970s.
  • Farmers in the area grow citrus fruits with much success.

much as possible

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Darren tried to stay away from him as much as possible.
  • His motto was: "School as much as possible!
  • He avoided cooperating with the Soviets as much as possible.

much faster

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Sequencing is much faster and more efficient.
  • Progress on creation of a constitution came much faster.
  • It was highly durable and had a much faster setting time.

without much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Subsequently, Chapman faded away without much comment.
  • The region has grown without much planning.
  • He won the 2015 general election without much opposition.

much earlier

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This had been suggested much earlier by Lane.
  • Accusations of similar cases had occurred much earlier.
  • But it was certainly inhabited much earlier.

much easier

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is much easier to read and to remember.
  • This makes typing in Harvard-Kyoto much easier than IAST.
  • And that makes my job so much easier."

so much so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ellie is in love with Russ, so much so she proposes marriage to him.
  • He was renowned for his slide tackling ability, so much so this became his trademark ability.
  • The ship's bow section was badly damaged, so much so that her propeller was raised out of the water.

much needed

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Sammut added 4 goals to give the Bulls a much needed win.
  • This produced much needed simplification.
  • (Old Testament)", giving Christeene a brief and much needed vacation.

received much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Tsang received much press coverage for her creation:
  • The mural has received much criticism.
  • The murals received much criticism.

much shorter

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Other countries often have much shorter seasons.
  • Other animals were selected for much shorter periods.
  • The petals are erect, oblong and much shorter than the sepals.

much closer

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The semi-final and final games were much closer.
  • Both games were much closer than the qualifiers.
  • It is much closer in texture to crumbled feta.

much money

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • That much money means an enormous amount of power.
  • We would have made so much money together ten years ago.

throughout much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Wallace had financial difficulties throughout much of his life.
  • The group soon became an overnight success throughout much of Europe.
  • He still managed to stay in the top three throughout much of the race.

much stronger

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A year later, a much stronger Dutch force attacked Ai.
  • I need to become much stronger mentally."
  • However, wheat exports were much stronger than the previous year.

much wider

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The park is much wider in the southern segments.
  • The result was much wider sidewalks and benches to sit on.
  • The double and twin rooms were much wider with more furniture.

much younger

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Edith and Elaine were much younger than their brothers.
  • The kimberlites themselves are much younger.
  • He had four younger sisters and one much younger brother.

much is known

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Not much is known of Kṣemarāja's life or parentage.
  • Not much is known about this fish's feeding habits.
  • Not much is known about Itkind's life until 1956.

lost much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • From then on, Buddhism lost much of its influence.
  • From that point on, the strike lost much of its momentum.
  • They lost much of their household goods when a steamer sank.

much of what

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The current building is much of what was restored in 1937.
  • His "De Vita Caesarum" is the source of much of what is known of Domitian.
  • (Philosophy at the time included much of what is now considered psychology.)

became much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Jewelry became much more colorful and varied in style.
  • The regional climate also became much wetter.
  • Metalworking and shipbuilding became much more developed.

much debate

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This ecumenical manifesto sparked much debate.
  • The goal was allowed and was the cause of much debate after the match.
  • He wrote: The article was highly controversial and much debate ensued.

through much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The town was fortified through much of the Middle Ages.
  • East Carolina led through much of the game.
  • Andersson was an alcoholic through much of his adult life.
E.g.
  • This clash of opinions has sparked much controversy.
  • Hun Sen and his government have seen much controversy.
  • The development of Bunker Hill caused much controversy.

much bigger

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • relationship is much bigger than any one project."
  • It is much bigger than most other leafcutting bees.
  • At this time, it looks much bigger than the Tigris River.

much further

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The modern church is situated much further inland.
  • But Leibniz took his speculations much further.
  • This distance extends much further in airborne and space radar.

across much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This band has travelled across much of the world.
  • The line runs across much of coastal Xihai'an.
  • It is widespread across much of Europe except the far north.

caused much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The tsunami caused much damage in Maui as well.
  • A severe earthquake in 1500 caused much damage.
  • The development of Bunker Hill caused much controversy.
E.g.
  • After not giving much information, he is released.
  • The inscriptions are too few to give much information about the language.
  • Not much information is known about the ritual parts of burying the dead.
E.g.
  • The second segment was much more difficult to produce.
  • This is considered much more difficult than playing blind chess.
  • As the war proceeded, internal transportation became much more difficult.

devoted much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He devoted much time to the study of foreign languages.
  • He devoted much of his last years to publishing his Journal.
  • Following William's death, Susan devoted much energy to carrying on his work.

spent much time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She kept the promise and spent much time in Bratislava.
  • He spent much time in private prayer and silent meditation.
  • Ka'iulani and the author spent much time together on the estate.

destroyed much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Kristallnacht destroyed much of the Jewish life in Leipzig.
  • A rock slide in 1873 destroyed much of the cultivated land.
  • The war destroyed much of the wealth that had existed in the South.

subject of much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 1-D metals have been the subject of much research.
  • Her antecedents are unclear and the subject of much speculation.
  • In particular four models have been the subject of much investigation.

much work

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • After this, much work was spent on flood defenses.
  • How he gets through with so much work, I don't know.
  • Campbell produced much work for the Midland Railway.

much reduced

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Slate production continues on a much reduced scale.
  • The "La Verna" sale was for a property much reduced in size.
  • Water and sediment volumes directly flowing east are now much reduced.

much damage

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The area suffered much damage during World War II.
  • The tsunami caused much damage in Maui as well.
  • A severe earthquake in 1500 caused much damage.

much power

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Men in these situations would not have much power to interfere.
  • Others fear that Express Entry gives too much power to politicians and bureaucrats.
  • Passing too much power through the coil can cause it to overheat (see ohmic heating).

much different

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In Zone 1, things are much different.
  • The terrain in Maple Grove is much different than Brooklyn Park.
  • Average temperatures are not much different throughout the year.

not have much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The club does not have much of a history.
  • The singles did not have much success.
  • Unlike its prelude, the fugue does not have much ornamentation.

much too

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But the promised relief arrived much too late.
  • Much too much noise, much too much commotion!
  • He opined that Short was much too attentive to his wife.

twice as much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • That has cost us at least twice as much as it needed to.
  • EUR, twice as much as the runner up which was 2006 with 24. bil.
  • Dvořák replied that other publishers would readily pay twice as much.

much improved

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He found that social and sports activities ashore were much improved.
  • The airport at Ogle would have been privatised, and much improved and extended.
  • The Inspectorate noted that the prison had much improved, and was well managed.

much slower

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The album is also much slower and smoother than the previous album.
  • However, on the northern end, it is much slower at only roughly per year.
  • There are also much slower styles, such as downtempo, chillout and nu jazz.

times as much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This means it can handle four times as much traffic as standard GPRS.
  • Goullet made 10 times as much.
  • This means they required about eight times as much biocapacity as Belgium contains.

much interest

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He had much interest in historical legal cases.
  • His novel "Dokuzuncu Hariciye Koğuşu" gained much interest.
  • During Wade's working years, he also focused much interest on his pro-bono work.

become much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This process has become much harder throughout the years.
  • I need to become much stronger mentally."
  • The "festa" has become much more lively by the time Lucy returns.

much criticism

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • TIF districts have attracted much criticism.
  • The novel was also met with much criticism.
  • La India's involvement with Santería drew much criticism.

much harder

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This process has become much harder throughout the years.
  • Creating Knockout rats is much harder and only became possible in 2003.
  • "The Paralympics are so much harder than the able-bodied side of sport.
E.g.
  • There has been much speculation as to the reasons behind it.
  • Her antecedents are unclear and the subject of much speculation.
  • There has been much speculation about the function of these finlets.

much simpler

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Compared to IAST, Harvard-Kyoto looks much simpler.
  • The grammar is based on English, but is much simpler.
  • The viharas of the earlier period are much simpler, and lack shrines.

much in common

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The magazine and Robertson's books share much in common.
  • These architectures seem to have much in common with Leon3.
  • These leaders had much in common.

much broader

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This white line is much broader in female.
  • "It's something much broader than that.
  • However, the "garay" were much broader and did not have outriggers.

gained much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It gained much radio attention, but failed to chart.
  • The rock band Tamouz gained much success in the 1970s.
  • His novel "Dokuzuncu Hariciye Koğuşu" gained much interest.

much more common

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In Europe, sprung slats are much more common.
  • animals, heights) are much more common than others (e.g.
  • Transits on Mercury are much more common.

spend much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He has to spend much of his time in water.
  • In the 1990s, Elon began to spend much of his time in Italy.
  • They spend much of their time hanging out at a downbeat tea shop.

just as much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The goal is just as much to become like Christ as it is to become one with Him.
  • In general, women had just as much right to have their legal cases heard as men did.
  • White-eared honeyeaters are often considered nectivores but feed on insects just as much.

during much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Crown stilts were in use during much the same time period as ring stilts.
  • This disappointment pushed Mocioni to renounce politics during much of the 1850s.
  • Formerly called Pyrmont, it was the seat of a small county during much of the Middle Ages.

much fun

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "I think I was having so much fun that it kept me going.
  • It's so much fun working with him.
  • On the other hand he stated that he enjoyed much fun playing the game.

attracted much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • TIF districts have attracted much criticism.
  • His "Observations of a Solicitor" attracted much attention.
  • Their controversy attracted much attention among Freemasons.

up much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The body, or living, chamber takes up much of the shell.
  • Then the Omni thing blew up much bigger than I had anticipated.
  • The change, however, stirred up much controversy among candidates.

much worse

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • If not, she will receive a fate much worse.
  • But its current condition is much worse.
  • However, it could have been much worse.

made much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The fins were made much smaller and triangular.
  • This is a painstaking process, made much easier today by computers.
  • However, none of the singles made much of a dent in the pop charts.

too much time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At 3–2, Verdasco was warned for taking too much time.
  • when White loses too much time with the queen.
  • Denning LJ held that Mr Leaf was barred because too much time had lapsed.

make much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It did not make much money for Stoker.
  • "Then I heard they did tests of apes skiing, which didn't make much sense."
  • Though failing to make much of a name, he ended up a support act for Steve Martin.

much more likely

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The young are much more likely to be functionally illiterate than the old.
  • Baby hamsters are much more likely to get the disease than older hamsters.
  • Crime perpetrators are much more likely to be intoxicated than crime victims.

became much more

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Jewelry became much more colorful and varied in style.
  • Metalworking and shipbuilding became much more developed.
  • After losing his friend, he became much more quiet and restrained.

much effort

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There's not much of a plot here, but you go with the flow without making much effort.
  • He invested much effort in the development of electric lighting of vehicles and stations.
  • Benson employs a relaxing therapy to coax Steckler's memory, succeeding with much effort.

much discussion

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It generated many responses and much discussion.
  • After much discussion, Mick accepts Archie's company.
  • After much discussion, the bridge was moved to Auguet.

so much more

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She brought in the hat rule and she organised so much more.
  • I am so much more than a belly dancer.
  • It could have been so much more."

much lighter

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This allows for simplicity of use and a much lighter weight.
  • The Ninth Symphony (1945), in contrast, was much lighter in tone.
  • Farmers then extract the water from the potato, leaving it much lighter and smaller.

although much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The overall design was quite reminiscent of the LearAvia Lear Fan, although much smaller.
  • There are other details and sculptures of note, although much was destroyed in the Revolution.
  • The illustrations, although much damaged, are done in the illusionistic style of late antiquity.

provided much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The animals provided much more than just food.
  • Miss Smythe provided much of the care during his extended convalescence.
  • The building provided much needed classroom, computer lab, and office space.

spending much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Trelawny began spending much of his time with Mary Shelley.
  • Wied's marmoset is highly social, spending much of its time grooming.
  • His health again prevented him from spending much time in the Senate.

still very much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The facts in this case are still very much in dispute.
  • Rishabh ignores her advances as he is still very much in love with Pari.
  • None-the-less, Prospect Creek is still very much in the middle of nowhere.

much more powerful

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Modification Q was much more powerful and known as the "Centimetric Mark IV".
  • "Kingdom Come" Superman is shown to be much more powerful than New Earth Superman.
  • Negative pore pressures in clayey soil can be much more powerful than those in sand.

much cheaper

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This leads to much cheaper launch vehicles.
  • the resulting project was much cheaper than using new equipment.
  • Given the expense of enrichment, this can make fuel much cheaper.
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