Ordeal Order-chenopodiales

Order

Meanings and phrases

Order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; Holy Order

order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed
  2. a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; order of magnitude
  3. established customary state (especially of society)
  4. logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; ordering; ordination
  5. a condition of regular or proper arrangement; orderliness
  6. a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); decree; edict; fiat; rescript
  7. a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities; purchase order
  8. a formal association of people with similar interests; club; social club; society; guild; gild; lodge
  9. a body of rules followed by an assembly; rules of order; parliamentary law; parliamentary procedure
  10. a group of person living under a religious rule; monastic order
  11. (biology) taxonomic group containing one or more families
  12. a request for something to be made, supplied, or served
  13. (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans
  14. the act of putting things in a sequential arrangement; ordering

order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority; tell; enjoin; say
  2. make a request for something
  3. issue commands or orders for; prescribe; dictate
  4. bring into conformity with rules or principles or usage; impose regulations; regulate; regularize; regularise; govern
  5. bring order to or into
  6. place in a certain order
  7. arrange thoughts, ideas, temporal events; arrange; set up; put
  8. appoint to a clerical posts; ordain; consecrate; ordinate
  9. assign a rank or rating to; rate; rank; range; grade; place

Augustinian order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of several monastic orders observing a rule derived from the writings of St. Augustine

Benedictine order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic monastic order founded in the 6th century; noted for liturgical worship and for scholarly activities; order of Saint Benedict

Carmelite order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic mendicant order founded in the 12th century; Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Carthusian order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an austere contemplative Roman Catholic order founded by St. Bruno in 1084

Composite order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman order that combines the Corinthian acanthus leaves with the spiral scrolls of the Ionic order

Corinthian order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the last Greek order; similar to the Ionic order except the capital is decorated with carvings of acanthus leaves

Distinguished Service Order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a British military decoration for special service in action

Dominican order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic order of mendicant preachers founded in the 13th century

Dorian order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no base; Doric order

Doric order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no base; Dorian order

Franciscan order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Francis of Assisi in the 13th century

Holy Order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; Order

Ionian order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the second Greek order; the capital is decorated with spiral scrolls; Ionic order

Ionic order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the second Greek order; the capital is decorated with spiral scrolls; Ionian order

Jesuit order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534 to defend Catholicism against the Reformation and to do missionary work among the heathen; it is strongly committed to education and scholarship; Society of Jesus

Orange Order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Protestant political organization in Northern Ireland; Association of Orangemen

Order Osteoglossiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. teleost fish with bony tongues; Osteoglossiformes

Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic mendicant order founded in the 12th century; Carmelite order

Order of the Purple Heart

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a United States military decoration awarded to any member of the armed forces who is wounded in action; Purple Heart

Robert 's Rules of Order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a book of rules for presiding over a meeting; written by Henry M. Martin in 1876 and subsequently updated through many editions

Tuscan order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman order that resembles the Doric order but without a fluted shaft

animal order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of animals

bacteria order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of bacteria

batting order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (baseball) a list of batters in the order in which they will bat; card; lineup
E.g.
  • Richardson scored a duck in the game, from the bottom of the batting order.
  • MacLaren changed the batting order, asking Gilbert Jessop to open the batting.
  • He once again struggled with the bat, picking up a duck from third in the batting order.

bill-me order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order that is received without payment; requires billing at a later date; credit order

call to order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. open formally

cease and desist order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (law) a judicial remedy issued in order to prohibit a party from doing or continuing to do a certain activity; injunction; enjoining; enjoinment

civil order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the form of government of a social organization; polity

close order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a military formation for drill or marching

court order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a writ issued by a court of law requiring a person to do something or to refrain from doing something
E.g.
  • She does go to meet him, only because of court order.
  • The alleged court order was ruled in favor of T-Series.
  • By court order they were both released on May 17, 1976.

credit order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order that is received without payment; requires billing at a later date; bill-me order

extended order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a military formation for skirmishing; as widely separated as the tactical situation permits

fungus order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of fungi

gag order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a court order restricting information or comment by the participants involved in a lawsuit

holy order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the sacrament of ordination

in good order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in the right manner; properly; decently; decent; right; the right way

in order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. in a state of proper readiness or preparation or arrangement

in short order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. without delay

large order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a formidable task or requirement; tall order

mail order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a purchase negotiated by mail
E.g.
  • They may also be sold in sex shops or by mail order.
  • The mail order business had over 50,000 subscribers.
  • Others sell by appointment or mail order only.

marching order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. equipage for marching

market order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order to a broker to sell or buy stocks or commodities at the prevailing market price

monastic order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a group of person living under a religious rule; order

money order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a written order for the payment of a sum to a named individual; obtainable and payable at a post office; postal order

natural order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the physical universe considered as an orderly system subject to natural (not human or supernatural) laws

open order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a military formation leaving enough space between ranks to allow an inspecting officer to pass

order Acarina

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mites and ticks; Acarina

order Accipitriformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications an alternative name for the Falconiformes; Accipitriformes

order Actinaria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. sea anemones; Actiniaria; order Actiniaria; Actinaria

order Actiniaria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. sea anemones; Actiniaria; Actinaria; order Actinaria

order Actinomycetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. filamentous or rod-shaped bacteria; Actinomycetales

order Actinomyxidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. parasites of worms; Actinomyxidia

order Aepyorniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. huge extinct flightless birds: elephant birds; Aepyorniformes

order Agaricales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. typical gilled mushrooms belonging to the subdivision Basidiomycota; Agaricales

order Alcyonaria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. corals and sea anemones having eight branches; Alcyonaria

order Alismales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of aquatic monocotyledonous herbaceous plants; Naiadales; order Naiadales; Alismales

order Amoebida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the animal order including amoebas; Amoebida; Amoebina; order Amoebina

order Amoebina

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the animal order including amoebas; Amoebida; order Amoebida; Amoebina

order Amphipoda

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small flat-bodied semiterrestrial crustaceans: whale lice; sand-hoppers; skeleton shrimp; Amphipoda

order Anacanthini

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. at least partially equivalent to the order Gadiformes in some classifications; Anacanthini

order Anaspida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct order of jawless vertebrates; Anaspida

order Andreaeales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. comprises a single genus: Andreaea; Andreaeales

order Anguilliformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. elongate fishes with pelvic fins and girdle absent or reduced; Anguilliformes; order Apodes

order Anoplura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. sucking lice; Anoplura

order Anostraca

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small aquatic crustaceans lacking a carapace: fairy shrimps; brine shrimps; Anostraca

order Anseriformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ducks; geese; swans; screamers; Anseriformes

order Anthocerotales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. hornworts; liverworts having a thalloid gametophyte; in some classification systems included in the class Hepaticopsida; Anthocerotales

order Anura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. frogs, toads, tree toads; Salientia; order Salientia; Anura; Batrachia; order Batrachia

order Aphyllophorales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. includes chiefly saprophytic fungi typically with shelflike bodies; sometimes placed in class Hymenomycetes or included in Agaricales; Aphyllophorales

order Aplacophora

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of Amphineura; Solenogastres; order Solenogastres; Aplacophora

order Apodes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. elongate fishes with pelvic fins and girdle absent or reduced; Anguilliformes; order Anguilliformes

order Apodiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. swifts; hummingbirds; Apodiformes

order Apterygiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a ratite bird order: flightless ground birds having vestigial wings and long bills and small eyes: kiwis; Apterygiformes

order Arales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Araceae; Lemnaceae; Arales

order Araneae

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. spiders; Araneae; Araneida; order Araneida

order Araneida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. spiders; Araneae; order Araneae; Araneida

order Aristolochiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of plants distinguished by tubular petaloid perianth and inferior ovary; Aristolochiales

order Artiodactyla

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of hooved mammals of the subclass Eutheria (including pigs and peccaries and hippopotami and members of the suborder Ruminantia) having an even number of functional toes; Artiodactyla

order Aspergillales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of fungi having a closed ascocarp (cleistothecium) with the asci scattered rather than gathered in a hymenium; Eurotiales; order Eurotiales; Aspergillales

order Auriculariales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Auriculariaceae; sometimes included in the order Tremellales; Auriculariales

order Batoidei

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fish with dorsoventrally flattened bodies; includes: rays; skates; guitarfishes; sawfishes; Rajiformes; order Rajiformes; Batoidei

order Batrachia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. frogs, toads, tree toads; Salientia; order Salientia; Anura; order Anura; Batrachia

order Belemnoidea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of extinct dibranchiate cephalopods related to the surviving spirulas; Belemnoidea

order Bennettitales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fossil gymnospermous plants of the Carboniferous; Bennettitales

order Berycomorphi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of spiny-finned fish in the superorder Acanthopterygii; Berycomorphi

order Blastocladiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fungi that carry out asexual reproduction by thick-walled resting spores that produce zoospores upon germination; sometimes placed in class Oomycetes; Blastocladiales

order Branchiura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. copepods with suctorial mouthparts; parasitic on fishes; Branchiura

order Bryales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. category used in some classification systems for mosses having the spore case separated from the capsule wall by a hollow intercellular space; Bryales

order Campanulales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of plants of the subclass Asteridae including: Campanulaceae; Lobeliaceae; Cucurbitaceae; Goodeniaceae; Compositae; Campanulales

order Caprimulgiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. goatsuckers; frogmouths; oilbirds; Caprimulgiformes

order Carnivora

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. cats; lions; tigers; panthers; dogs; wolves; jackals; bears; raccoons; skunks; and members of the suborder Pinnipedia; Carnivora

order Caryophyllales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. corresponds approximately to the older group Centrospermae; Caryophyllales; Chenopodiales; order-Chenopodiales

order Casuariiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a ratite bird order: cassowaries and emus; Casuariiformes

order Casuarinales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of chiefly Australian trees and shrubs comprising the casuarinas; 1 family: Casuarinaceae; Casuarinales

order Caudata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. salamanders; newts; congo snakes; Urodella; order Urodella; Caudata

order Cestida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ctenophore having short tentacles; one family; Cestida

order Cetacea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of Eutheria; Cetacea

order Charadriiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large diverse order of aquatic birds found along seacoasts and inland waters: shorebirds and coastal diving birds; most feed on anima life; Charadriiformes

order Charales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of macroscopic fresh and brackish water algae with a distinct axis: stoneworts; Charales

order Chelonethida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. false scorpions; Chelonethida; Pseudoscorpionida; order Pseudoscorpionida; Pseudoscorpiones; order Pseudoscorpiones

order Chelonia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. tortoises and turtles; Chelonia; Testudinata; order Testudinata; Testudines; order Testudines

order Chiroptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an old order dating to early Eocene: bats: suborder Megachiroptera (fruit bats); suborder Microchiroptera (insectivorous bats); Chiroptera

order Chlorococcales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. unicellular green algae that reproduce by spores; Chlorococcales

order Chytridiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. simple aquatic fungi mostly saprophytic but some parasitic on higher plants or animals or fresh water fungi; sometimes placed in class Oomycetes; Chytridiales

order Ciconiiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of chiefly tropical marsh-dwelling fish-eating wading birds with long legs and bills and (except for flamingos) unwebbed feet: herons; storks; spoonbills; flamingos; ibises; Ciconiiformes

order Cilioflagellata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications considered a phylum of the kingdom Protista; in others included in the plant phylum Pyrrophyta; Dinoflagellata; order Dinoflagellata; Cilioflagellata

order Coccidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Telosporidia; Coccidia

order Coleoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. beetles; Coleoptera

order Collembola

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. minute wingless arthropods: springtails; Collembola

order Columbiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. sand grouse; pigeons; doves; extinct dodos and solitaires; Columbiformes

order Colymbiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. grebes; Podicipitiformes; order Podicipitiformes; Podicipediformes; order Podicipediformes; Colymbiformes

order Commelinales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of monocotyledonous herbs; Xyridales; order Xyridales; Commelinales

order Coniferales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. profusely branching and chiefly evergreen trees and some shrubs having narrow or needlelike leaves; Coniferales

order Conodonta

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct order of primitive vertebrates; the precise taxonomy is not clear; in some classifications considered a separate phylum; Conodonta; Conodontophorida; order Conodontophorida

order Conodontophorida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct order of primitive vertebrates; the precise taxonomy is not clear; in some classifications considered a separate phylum; Conodonta; order Conodonta; Conodontophorida

order Coraciiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. rollers; kingfishers; hornbills; hoopoes; motmots; bee eaters; todies; Coraciiformes

order Cordaitales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct plants having tall arborescent trunks comparable to or more advanced than cycads; known from the Pennsylvanian period; probably extinct since the Mesozoic era; Cordaitales

order Corrodentia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of insects: includes booklice and bark-lice; Psocoptera; order Psocoptera; Corrodentia

order Crocodilia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. crocodiles; alligators; caimans; gavials; Crocodylia; order Crocodylia; Crocodilia

order Crocodylia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. crocodiles; alligators; caimans; gavials; Crocodylia; Crocodilia; order Crocodilia

order Cuculiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. cuckoos; touracos; etc.; Cuculiformes

order Cycadales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. primitive tropical gymnosperms abundant in the Mesozoic, now reduced to a few scattered tropical forms; Cycadales

order Cycadofilicales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fossil gymnospermous trees or climbing plants from the Devonian: seed ferns; Cycadofilicales; Lyginopteridales; order Lyginopteridales

order Cyclostomata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. primitive jawless aquatic vertebrate: lampreys; hagfishes; Cyclostomata

order Cydippea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ctenophores having two long pinnate tentacles; Cydippida; order Cydippida; Cydippidea; order Cydippidea; Cydippea

order Cydippida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ctenophores having two long pinnate tentacles; Cydippida; Cydippidea; order Cydippidea; Cydippea; order Cydippea

order Cydippidea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ctenophores having two long pinnate tentacles; Cydippida; order Cydippida; Cydippidea; Cydippea; order Cydippea

order Cypriniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of animals including almost entirely freshwater fishes: characins; loaches; carp; suckers; sometimes classified as a suborder of Ostariophysi; Cypriniformes

order Decapoda

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lobsters; crayfish; crabs; shrimps; prawns; Decapoda
  2. squids and cuttlefishes; Decapoda

order Dermaptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. earwigs and a few related forms; Dermaptera

order Dermoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. flying lemurs; Dermoptera

order Diapensiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. used in some classifications: coextensive with family Diapensiaceae; Diapensiales

order Dicranales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. widely distributed order of mosses with erect gametophores and sporophytes at the tips of stems; Dicranales

order Dictyoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications replaced by the orders (here suborders) Blattodea (cockroaches) and Manteodea (mantids); in former classifications often subsumed under a much broader order Orthoptera; Dictyoptera

order Dinocerata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of primitive ungulates of the Paleocene and Eocene; Dinocerata

order Dinoflagellata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications considered a phylum of the kingdom Protista; in others included in the plant phylum Pyrrophyta; Dinoflagellata; Cilioflagellata; order Cilioflagellata

order Dinornithiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a ratite bird order: recently extinct flightless birds of New Zealand; Dinornithiformes

order Diptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a large order of insects having a single pair of wings and sucking or piercing mouths; includes true flies and mosquitoes and gnats and crane flies; Diptera

order Discocephali

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of fishes comprising the remoras; Discocephali

order Ebenales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. trees or shrubs of the families Ebenaceae or Sapotaceae or Styracaceae or Symplocaceae; Ebenales

order Edentata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of mammals having few or no teeth including: New World anteaters; sloths; armadillos; Edentata

order Embiodea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. web spinners; Embioptera; order Embioptera; Embiodea

order Embioptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. web spinners; Embioptera; Embiodea; order Embiodea

order Endomycetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fungi having a zygote or a single cell developing directly into an ascus; Endomycetales

order Entomophthorales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Entomophthoraceae; Entomophthorales

order Ephemerida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mayflies; Ephemeroptera; order Ephemeroptera; Ephemerida

order Ephemeroptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mayflies; Ephemeroptera; Ephemerida; order Ephemerida

order Equisetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lower tracheophytes in existence since the Devonian; Equisetales

order Ericales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Ericaceae; Clethraceae; Diapensiaceae; Epacridaceae; Lennoaceae; Pyrolaceae; Monotropaceae; Ericales

order Erysiphales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. saprophytic and parasitic fungi that live on plants; Erysiphales

order Eubacteriales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of two usually recognized orders of true bacteria; Gram-positive spherical or rod-shaped forms; some are motile; in some classifications considered an order of Schizomycetes; Eubacteriales

order Eubryales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mosses with perennial erect gametophores and stems with rows of leaves and drooping capsules; Eubryales

order Euphausiacea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small commonly luminescent crustaceans; important element of marine plankton: krill; Euphausiacea

order Eurotiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of fungi having a closed ascocarp (cleistothecium) with the asci scattered rather than gathered in a hymenium; Eurotiales; Aspergillales; order Aspergillales

order Eurypterida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct aquatic arthropods of the Paleozoic; Eurypterida

order Exocycloida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. flat sea urchins; Exocycloida

order Fagales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous trees of the subclass Hamamelidae; Fagales

order Falconiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. chiefly diurnal carnivorous birds having hooked beaks and long talons with opposable hind toe: falcons; hawks; eagles; ospreys; caracaras; vultures; Falconiformes

order Filicales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. true (leptosporangiate) ferns; Filicales; Polypodiales; order Polypodiales

order Foraminifera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. foraminifers; Foraminifera

order Fucales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Fucaceae; Fucales

order Gadiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. cods, haddocks, grenadiers; in some classifications considered equivalent to the order Anacanthini; Gadiformes

order Galliformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pheasants; turkeys; grouse; partridges; quails; chickens; brush turkeys; curassows; hoatzins; Galliformes

order Ganoidei

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a group of mostly extinct primitive bony fishes characterized by armor-like bony scales; Ganoidei

order Gaviiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large aquatic birds: loons and some extinct forms; Gaviiformes

order Gentianales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants having gamopetalous flowers; Gentianaceae; Apocynaceae; Asclepiadaceae; Loganiaceae; Oleaceae; Salvadoraceae; Gentianales

order Geophilomorpha

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small elongate centipedes living in soil and under stones and having more than 30 pairs of legs; Geophilomorpha

order Geraniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of plants of subclass Rosidae including geraniums and many other plants; see Euphorbiaceae; Geraniaceae; Rutaceae; Malpighiaceae; Simaroubaceae; Meliaceae; Zygophyllaceae; Tropaeolaceae; Geraniales

order Ginkgoales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Ginkgoaceae: plants that first appeared in the Permian and now represented by a single surviving species; often included in Coniferales; Ginkgoales

order Gnetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. chiefly tropical or xerophytic woody plants; practically unknown as fossils but considered close to the ancestral line of angiosperms; Gnetales

order Graminales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. grasses; sedges; rushes; Graminales

order Gregarinida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Telosporidia; Gregarinida

order Gruiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. inland marsh-dwelling birds with long legs and necks and bills that wade in water in search of food: cranes; rails; bustards; Gruiformes

order Guttiferales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. used in some classifications; coextensive with Parietales; Guttiferales

order Gymnophiona

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of amphibians including caecilians; Gymnophiona

order Haemosporidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Telosporidia; Haemosporidia

order Haplosporidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Acnidosporidia; Haplosporidia

order Heliozoa

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mostly freshwater protozoa; Heliozoa

order Helotiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of fungi having asci in a disk-shaped to goblet-shaped apothecium; Helotiales

order Hemiptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. plant bugs; bedbugs; some true bugs; also includes suborders Heteroptera (true bugs) and Homoptera (e.g., aphids, plant lice and cicadas); Hemiptera

order Heterosomata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. flatfishes: halibut; sole; flounder; plaice; turbot; tonguefishes; Heterosomata; order Pleuronectiformes

order Heterotrichales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. yellow-green algae with simple or branching filaments; comprising the single family Tribonemaceae; Heterotrichales

order Hymenogastrales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of fungi belonging to the class Gasteromycetes; has a distinct basidiocarp with a fleshy or waxy gleba (sometimes placed in subclass Homobasidiomycetes); Hymenogastrales

order Hymenoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of insects including: bees; wasps; ants; ichneumons; sawflies; gall wasps; etc.; Hymenoptera

order Hypericales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a large order of dicotyledonous plants of subclass Dilleniidae; Parietales; order Parietales; Hypericales

order Hypermastigina

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. cellulose-producing flagellates; Hypermastigina

order Hypocreales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. used in some classifications for the family Hypocreaceae; Hypocreales

order Hyracoidea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. hyraxes and some extinct animals; Hyracoidea

order Ichthyosauria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct marine reptiles: ichthyosaurs; Ichthyosauria

order Ictodosauria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct reptiles of the later Triassic period; Ictodosauria

order Insectivora

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. shrews; moles; hedgehogs; tenrecs; Insectivora

order Insessores

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a bird with feet adapted for perching (as on tree branches); this order is now generally abandoned by taxonomists; Insessores; perching bird; percher

order Isoetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. aquatic or marsh-growing fern allies; known to have existed since the Cenozoic; sometimes included in Lycopodiales; Isoetales

order Isopoda

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. woodlice; Isopoda

order Isoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of social insects that live in colonies, including: termites; often placed in subclass Exopterygota; Isoptera

order Isospondyli

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. most primitive teleost fishes; all are soft-finned: salmon; trout; herring; shad; sardines; anchovies; whitefish; smelts; tarpon; Isospondyli

order Juglandales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Juglandaceae; Juglandales

order Jungermanniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large order of chiefly tropical liverworts; Jungermanniales

order Lagomorpha

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. rabbits; hares; pikas; formerly considered the suborder Duplicidentata of the order Rodentia; Lagomorpha

order Laminariales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications coextensive with family Laminariaceae: marine brown algae of cold or polar seas; Laminariales

order Lechanorales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. category used in some classification systems for all lichens that produce apothecia; Lechanorales

order Lepidodendrales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fossil arborescent plants arising during the early Devonian and conspicuous throughout the Carboniferous; Lepidodendrales

order Lepidoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. moths and butterflies; Lepidoptera

order Lichenales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. category used especially in former classifications for organisms now constituting the division Lichenes; Lichenales

order Liliales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of monocotyledonous plants including Amaryllidaceae and Liliaceae and Iridaceae; Liliales

order Lobata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. ctenophore having tentacles only in the immature stage; body compressed vertically having two large oral lobes and four pointed processes; Lobata

order Loricata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. former name for the order Crocodylia; Loricata

order Lycoperdales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of basidiomycetous fungi having fleshy often globose fruiting bodies; includes puffballs and earthstars; Lycoperdales

order Lycopodiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lower vascular plants coextensive with the family Lycopodiaceae; in some classifications includes the Selaginellaceae and Isoetaceae; Lycopodiales

order Lyginopteridales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fossil gymnospermous trees or climbing plants from the Devonian: seed ferns; Cycadofilicales; order Cycadofilicales; Lyginopteridales

order Madreporaria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. stony corals; Madreporaria

order Mallophaga

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. biting lice; Mallophaga

order Malvales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Malvaceae; Bombacaceae; Elaeocarpaceae; Sterculiaceae; Tiliaceae; Malvales

order Marattiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lower ferns coextensive with the family Marattiaceae; Marattiales

order Marchantiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. liverworts with gametophyte differentiated internally; Marchantiales

order Marsupialia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the subclass Metatheria; Marsupialia

order Mecoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of carnivorous insects usually having long membranous wings and long beaklike heads with chewing mouths at the tip; Mecoptera

order Moniliales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of imperfect fungi lacking conidiophores of having conidiophores that are superficial and not enclosed in a pycnidium; Moniliales

order Monotremata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the subclass Prototheria; Monotremata

order Mucorales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of mostly saprophytic fungi; Mucorales

order Musales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. tropical plants; Musales

order Myaceae

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. clams; Myaceae

order Mycelia Sterilia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of imperfect fungi having no known spore stage; Mycelia Sterilia

order Mycoplasmatales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Mycoplasmataceae; Mycoplasmatales

order Mycrosporidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Cnidosporidia; Mycrosporidia

order Myricales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Myricaceae; Myricales

order Myrtales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Myrtaceae; Combretaceae; Elaeagnaceae; Haloragidaceae; Melastomaceae; Lecythidaceae; Lythraceae; Rhizophoraceae; Onagraceae; Lecythidaceae; Punicaceae; Myrtales; Thymelaeales; order Thymelaeales

order Mysidacea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. opossum shrimp; Mysidacea

order Myxobacterales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of higher bacteria; order Myxobacteria; Myxobacterales; Myxobacteriales; order Myxobacteriales

order Myxobacteria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of higher bacteria; Myxobacterales; order Myxobacterales; Myxobacteriales; order Myxobacteriales

order Myxobacteriales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of higher bacteria; order Myxobacteria; Myxobacterales; order Myxobacterales; Myxobacteriales

order Myxosporidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order in the subclass Cnidosporidia; Myxosporidia

order Naiadales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of aquatic monocotyledonous herbaceous plants; Naiadales; Alismales; order Alismales

order Neuroptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of insects including: lacewings; antlions; dobsonflies; alderflies; fish flies; mantispids; spongeflies; Neuroptera

order Nidulariales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of basidiomycetous fungi comprising families Nidulariaceae and Sphaerobolaceae; Nidulariales

order Notostraca

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small freshwater crustaceans with a shield-shaped carapace; Notostraca

order Nudibranchia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. comprising numerous marine gastropod mollusks lacking a shell in the adult state and usually having a body like a slug; Nudibranchia

order Octopoda

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. octopuses and paper nautilus; Octopoda

order Odonata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. dragonflies and damselflies; Odonata

order Oleales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Oleaceae; in some classifications included in the order Gentianales; Oleales

order Ophioglossales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Ophioglossaceae; Ophioglossales

order Opiliones

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. harvestmen; Phalangida; order Phalangida; Opiliones

order Opuntiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Cactaceae: cactuses; Opuntiales

order Orchidales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of plants with irregular flowers having minute seeds: Orchidaceae; Burmanniaceae; Orchidales

order Ornithischia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct terrestrial reptiles having bird-like pelvises: armored dinosaurs (thyreophorans); boneheaded and horned dinosaurs (marginocephalians); duck-billed dinosaurs (euronithopods); Ornithischia

order Orthoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. grasshoppers and locusts; crickets; Orthoptera

order Ostariophysi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications considered a superorder comprising the Cypriniformes and the Siluriformes; Ostariophysi

order Ostracodermi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct group of armored jawless vertebrates; taxonomy is not clear; Ostracodermi

order Palmales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Palmae: palms; Palmales

order Pandanales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. families Typhaceae; Sparganiaceae; Pandanaceae; Pandanales

order Papaverales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants; Rhoeadales; order Rhoeadales; Papaverales

order Parietales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a large order of dicotyledonous plants of subclass Dilleniidae; Parietales; Hypericales; order Hypericales

order Passeriformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. largest order of birds comprising about half the known species; rooks; finches; sparrows; tits; warblers; robins; wrens; swallows; etc.; the four suborders are Eurylaimi and Tyranni and Menurae and Oscines or Passeres; Passeriformes

order Pectinibranchia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large order of gastropods comprising univalve mollusks that have a single gill resembling a comb; Pectinibranchia

order Pediculati

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. anglers and batfishes; spiny-finned marine fishes having pectoral fins at the ends of armlike processes and a long movable spine on the dorsal fin to lure prey to the large mouth; Pediculati

order Pedipalpi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. whip scorpions; Pedipalpi; Uropygi; order Uropygi

order Pelecaniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pelicans; frigate birds; gannets; cormorants; Pelecaniformes

order Pelycosauria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. edaphosaurus; dimetrodon; Pelycosauria

order Perciformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of the largest natural groups of fishes of both marine and fresh water: true perches; basses; tuna; Perciformes; Percomorphi; order Percomorphi

order Percomorphi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of the largest natural groups of fishes of both marine and fresh water: true perches; basses; tuna; Perciformes; order Perciformes; Percomorphi

order Perissodactyla

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. nonruminant ungulates: horses; tapirs; rhinoceros; extinct forms; Perissodactyla

order Peronosporales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of chiefly parasitic lower fungi: Albuginaceae and Peronosporaceae and Pythiaceae; Peronosporales

order Pezizales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of mostly saprophytic fungi having cup-shaped ascocarps; Pezizales

order Phalangida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. harvestmen; Phalangida; Opiliones; order Opiliones

order Phallales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of fungi comprising the stinkhorns and related forms whose mature hymenium is slimy and fetid; sometimes placed in subclass Homobasidiomycetes; Phallales

order Phasmatodea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications considered a suborder of Orthoptera: stick insects; leaf insects; Phasmida; order Phasmida; Phasmatodea

order Phasmida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications considered a suborder of Orthoptera: stick insects; leaf insects; Phasmida; Phasmatodea; order Phasmatodea

order Pholidota

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pangolins; in some former classifications included in the order Edentata; Pholidota

order Picariae

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. term used in some classifications as nearly equivalent to the order Coraciiformes; Picariae

order Piciformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. woodpeckers; jacamars; puffbirds; barbets; honey guides; toucans; Piciformes

order Piperales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Piperaceae; Saururaceae; Chloranthaceae; Piperales

order Plantaginales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Plantaginaceae; Plantaginales

order Platyctenea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of Tentaculata; Platyctenea

order Plecoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. stoneflies; Plecoptera

order Plectognathi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. boxfishes; filefishes; globefishes; ocean sunfishes; triggerfishes; puffers; Plectognathi; order Tetraodontiformes

order Pleuronectiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. flatfishes: halibut; sole; flounder; plaice; turbot; tonguefishes; Heterosomata; order Heterosomata

order Plumbaginales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Plumbaginaceae; usually included in order Primulales; Plumbaginales

order Podicipediformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. grebes; Podicipitiformes; order Podicipitiformes; Podicipediformes; Colymbiformes; order Colymbiformes

order Podicipitiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. grebes; Podicipitiformes; Podicipediformes; order Podicipediformes; Colymbiformes; order Colymbiformes

order Polemoniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Polemoniaceae; Solanaceae; Boraginaceae; Labiatae; Lentibulariaceae; Pedaliaceae; in some classifications includes the order Scrophulariales; Polemoniales

order Polygonales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Polygonaceae,; Polygonales

order Polymastigina

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small usually parasitic flagellates; Polymastigina

order Polypodiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. true (leptosporangiate) ferns; Filicales; order Filicales; Polypodiales

order Primates

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an animal order including lemurs and tarsiers and monkeys and apes and human beings; Primates

order Primulales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Primulaceae; Theophrastaceae; Myrsinaceae; and (in some classifications) Plumbaginaceae; Primulales

order Proboscidea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of animals including elephants and mammoths; Proboscidea

order Procellariiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. petrels; albatrosses; shearwaters; diving petrels; Procellariiformes

order Proteales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Proteaceae; Proteales

order Protura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. minute wingless arthropods: telsontails; Protura

order Pseudomonadales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of two usually recognized orders of true bacteria; Gram-negative spiral or spherical or rod-shaped bacteria usually motile by polar flagella; some contain photosynthetic pigments; Pseudomonadales

order Pseudoscorpiones

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. false scorpions; Chelonethida; order Chelonethida; Pseudoscorpionida; order Pseudoscorpionida; Pseudoscorpiones

order Pseudoscorpionida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. false scorpions; Chelonethida; order Chelonethida; Pseudoscorpionida; Pseudoscorpiones; order Pseudoscorpiones

order Psilophytales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Paleozoic simple dichotomously branched plants of Europe and eastern Canada including the oldest known vascular land plants; Psilophytales

order Psilotales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lower vascular plants having dichotomously branched sporophyte divided into aerial shoot and rhizome and lacking true roots; Psilotales

order Psittaciformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of birds including parrots and amazons and cockatoos and lorikeets and lories and macaws and parakeets; Psittaciformes

order Psocoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of insects: includes booklice and bark-lice; Psocoptera; Corrodentia; order Corrodentia

order Pterosauria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct flying reptiles: pterosaurs; Pterosauria

order Pulmonata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large order of gastropods usually breathing by means of a lung-like sac comprising most land snails and slugs and many freshwater snails; Pulmonata

order Pycnogonida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. sea spiders; Pycnogonida

order Radiolaria

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. marine protozoa; Radiolaria

order Rajiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fish with dorsoventrally flattened bodies; includes: rays; skates; guitarfishes; sawfishes; Rajiformes; Batoidei; order Batoidei

order Ranales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. herbs, shrubs and trees: includes families Ranunculaceae; Annonaceae; Berberidaceae; Magnoliaceae; Menispermaceae; Myristicaceae; Nymphaeaceae; Lardizabalaceae; Lauraceae; Calycanthaceae; Ceratophyllaceae; Cercidiphyllaceae; Ranales; Ranunculales; order Ranunculales

order Ranunculales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. herbs, shrubs and trees: includes families Ranunculaceae; Annonaceae; Berberidaceae; Magnoliaceae; Menispermaceae; Myristicaceae; Nymphaeaceae; Lardizabalaceae; Lauraceae; Calycanthaceae; Ceratophyllaceae; Cercidiphyllaceae; Ranales; order Ranales; Ranunculales

order Raptores

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. term used in former classifications; erroneously grouped together birds of the orders Falconiformes and Strigiformes; Raptores

order Rhamnales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants; Rhamnales

order Rheiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a ratite bird order: birds intermediate in characteristics between ostriches and emus: recent and extinct rheas; Rheiformes

order Rhoeadales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants; Rhoeadales; Papaverales; order Papaverales

order Rhynchocephalia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. tuataras; extinct forms from middle Triassic; Rhynchocephalia

order Rickettsiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pleomorphic Gram-negative microorganisms; Rickettsiales

order Rodentia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small gnawing animals: porcupines; rats; mice; squirrels; marmots; beavers; gophers; voles; hamsters; guinea pigs; agoutis; Rodentia

order Rosales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications this category does not include Leguminosae; Rosales

order Rubiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants of the subclass Asteridae; have opposite leaves and an inferior compound ovary; Rubiales

order Salicales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Salicaceae; Salicales

order Salientia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. frogs, toads, tree toads; Salientia; Anura; order Anura; Batrachia; order Batrachia

order Santalales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of plants distinguished by having a one-celled inferior ovary; many are parasitic or partly parasitic usually on roots; Santalales

order Sapindales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants; Sapindales

order Saprolegniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of chiefly aquatic fungi; Saprolegniales

order Sarcosporidia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. imperfectly known parasites of the muscles of vertebrates; Sarcosporidia

order Sarraceniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. plants that are variously modified to serve as insect traps: families Sarraceniaceae; Nepenthaceae; Droseraceae; Sarraceniales

order Saurischia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct terrestrial reptiles: theropods (carnivorous); sauropods (herbivorous); Saurischia

order Sauropterygia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct marine reptiles: plesiosaurs; nothosaurs; Sauropterygia

order Scandentia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a small order comprising only the tree shrews: in some classifications tree shrews are considered either primates (and included in the suborder Prosimii) or true insectivores (and included in the order Insectivora); Scandentia

order Sclerodermatales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of fungi having a peridium surrounding a gleba (sometimes placed in subclass Homobasidiomycetes); Sclerodermatales

order Scleroparei

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. scorpionfishes; sculpins; gurnards; greenlings; flying gurnards; Scleroparei

order Scorpionida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. true scorpions; Scorpionida

order Scrophulariales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. used in some classification systems; often included in the order Polemoniales; Scrophulariales

order Secotiales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of fungi belonging to the class Gasteromycetes; Secotiales

order Selaginellales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in some classifications included in Lycopodiales; Selaginellales

order Siluriformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of fish belonging to the superorder Malacopterygii including catfishes; Siluriformes

order Siphonaptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fleas; Siphonaptera

order Siphonophora

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. marine colonial hydrozoans; Siphonophora

order Sirenia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an animal order including: manatees; dugongs; Steller's sea cow; Sirenia

order Solenichthyes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. bellows fishes; shrimpfishes; cornetfishes; pipefishes; small order of chiefly tropical marine fishes of varied and bizarre form all having a small mouth at the end of a drawn-out tubular snout; Solenichthyes

order Solenogastres

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of Amphineura; Solenogastres; Aplacophora; order Aplacophora

order Spatangoida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. heart-shaped sea urchins; Spatangoida

order Sphaeriales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. large order of ascomycetous fungi usually having a dark hard perithecia with definite ostioles; in more recent classifications often divided among several orders; Sphaeriales

order Sphaerocarpales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order sometimes included in the order Jungermanniales; Sphaerocarpales

order Sphagnales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the genus Sphagnum; in some classifications isolated in a separate subclass; Sphagnales

order Sphenisciformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. penguins; Sphenisciformes

order Spirochaetales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. higher bacteria; slender spiral rodlike forms; Spirochaetales

order Squamata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. diapsid reptiles: snakes and lizards; Squamata

order Stegocephalia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in former classifications a division of class Amphibia comprising all pre-Jurassic and some later extinct large salamandriform amphibia; Stegocephalia

order Stereospondyli

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. formerly a suborder of Stegocephalia; amphibia having vertebrae whose component elements are fused into a single piece; Stereospondyli

order Stomatopoda

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. mantis shrimps; Stomatopoda

order Strigiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. owls; Strigiformes

order Struthioniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a ratite bird order: ostriches and related extinct birds; known from the Pleistocene onward; Struthioniformes

order Synentognathi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. order of fishes having spineless fins; needlefishes; sauries; flying fishes; halfbeaks; Synentognathi

order Taxales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Taxaceae: yews; Taxales

order Temnospondyli

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. formerly a suborder of Stegocephalia; large Carboniferous and Permian amphibians having vertebrae in which some elements remain separate; Temnospondyli

order Testacea

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. testacean rhizopods; Testacea

order Testudinata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. tortoises and turtles; Chelonia; order Chelonia; Testudinata; Testudines; order Testudines

order Testudines

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. tortoises and turtles; Chelonia; order Chelonia; Testudinata; order Testudinata; Testudines

order Tetraodontiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. boxfishes; filefishes; globefishes; ocean sunfishes; triggerfishes; puffers; Plectognathi; order Plectognathi

order Thecodontia

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct terrestrial reptiles having teeth set in sockets; of the late Permian to Triassic; Thecodontia

order Therapsida

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. extinct mammal-like reptiles found inhabiting all continents from the mid Permian to late Triassic; Therapsida

order Thymelaeales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Myrtaceae; Combretaceae; Elaeagnaceae; Haloragidaceae; Melastomaceae; Lecythidaceae; Lythraceae; Rhizophoraceae; Onagraceae; Lecythidaceae; Punicaceae; Myrtales; order Myrtales; Thymelaeales

order Thysanoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. thrips; Thysanoptera

order Thysanura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. firebrats; silverfish; machilids; Thysanura

order Tinamiformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. coextensive with the family Tinamidae; Tinamiformes

order Torpediniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. rays with bodies shaped like torpedoes; Torpediniformes

order Tremellales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. fungi varying from gelatinous to waxy or even horny in texture; most are saprophytic; Tremellales

order Trichoptera

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of insects consisting of caddis flies; Trichoptera

order Trogoniformes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. trogons; Trogoniformes

order Tuberales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. small order of fungi belonging to the subdivision Ascomycota having closed underground ascocarps; Tuberales

order Tubulidentata

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of Eutheria; Tubulidentata

order Tulostomatales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of fungi belonging to the class Gasteromycetes; Tulostomatales

order Ulvales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of protoctist; Ulvales

order Umbellales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. plants having umbels or corymbs of uniovulate flowers; includes the Umbelliferae (chiefly herbs) and Cornaceae (chiefly trees or shrubs); Umbellales

order Uredinales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. rust fungi: parasitic fungi causing rust in plants; sometimes placed in; Uredinales

order Urodella

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. salamanders; newts; congo snakes; Urodella; Caudata; order Caudata

order Uropygi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. whip scorpions; Pedipalpi; order Pedipalpi; Uropygi

order Urticales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of dicotyledonous plants including Moraceae and Urticaceae and Ulmaceae; Urticales

order Ustilaginales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. parasitic fungi causing smuts; sometimes placed in class Tiliomycetes; Ustilaginales

order Volvocales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. chiefly freshwater green algae; solitary or colonial; Volvocales

order Xiphosura

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. horseshoe crabs and extinct forms; Xiphosura

order Xyridales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order of monocotyledonous herbs; Xyridales; Commelinales; order Commelinales

order Zeomorphi

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. dories; Zeomorphi

order Zygnemales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pond scums; desmids; Zygnematales; order Zygnematales; Zygnemales

order Zygnematales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. pond scums; desmids; Zygnematales; Zygnemales; order Zygnemales

order arms

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a position in the manual of arms; the rifle is held vertically on the right side with the butt on the ground; often used as a command

order book

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a book in which customers' orders are entered; usually makes multiple copies of the order
  2. a printed copy of the order of the day; order paper

order code

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the portion of a set of operation descriptions that specifies the operation to be performed; the set of operations in a computer; operation code

order form

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a form to use when placing an order
n.
  1. an order of insect identified in 2002 in a 45 million year old piece of amber from the Baltic region; Mantophasmatodea

order oedogoniales

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. simple or branched filamentous freshwater green algae; Oedogoniales

order of Saint Benedict

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a Roman Catholic monastic order founded in the 6th century; noted for liturgical worship and for scholarly activities; Benedictine order

order of business

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a list of matters to be taken up (as at a meeting); agenda; agendum

order of magnitude

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; order
  2. a number assigned to the ratio of two quantities; two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other; the number of magnitudes that the quantities differ is specified to within a power of 10; magnitude
E.g.
  • Conversely, DHEA-S levels are an order of magnitude higher at 1–10 μM.
  • For example, using bitmap indexes, sorting can improve compression by an order of magnitude.
  • The following are characters used to denote small order of magnitude in Chinese historically.

order of payment

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a document ordering the payment of money; drawn by one person or bank on another; draft; bill of exchange

order of the day

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of business for an assembly on a given day

order paper

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a printed copy of the order of the day; order book

pecking order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the organization of people at different ranks in an administrative body; hierarchy; power structure

plant order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of plants

point of order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a question as to whether the current proceedings are allowed by parliamentary procedure

postal order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a written order for the payment of a sum to a named individual; obtainable and payable at a post office; money order

production order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order that initiates the manufacturing process

protoctist order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of protoctists

purchase order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities; order

rank order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an arrangement according to rank

religious order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a subdivision of a larger religious group; sect; religious sect
E.g.
  • She is a Dame of Malta, a Roman Catholic lay religious order.
  • It is run by a religious order of nuns.
  • On 29 April 1979 he became the first beatified member of his religious order.

rules of order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a body of rules followed by an assembly; order; parliamentary law; parliamentary procedure

short order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order for food that can be prepared quickly

side order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a dish that is served with, but is subordinate to, a main course; side dish; entremets

standing order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a rule of order permanently in force

stop order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order to a broker to sell (buy) when the price of a security falls (rises) to a designated level; stop-loss order

stop-loss order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an order to a broker to sell (buy) when the price of a security falls (rises) to a designated level; stop order

tall order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a formidable task or requirement; large order

telephone order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. receiving orders via telephone

temporal order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. arrangement of events in time; temporal arrangement

to order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to specification

word order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of words in a text
E.g.
  • Possession is colloquially expressed by word order.
  • This illustrates the noun-adjective word order.
  • The primary word order is subject–verb–object.

order to make

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This was done in order to make them submit easily.
  • in order to make a deal to take down Andrew Forson.
  • Sesame oil or perilla oil is added in order to make namul.

order to avoid

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The younger fish stay near the bottom in order to avoid predators.
  • The women killed both themselves and their children in order to avoid slavery.
  • The Genji charge directly into the Heishi fleet in order to avoid direct fire.

order to prevent

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The process is done in this order to prevent statelessness.
  • He razed his castle in order to prevent in falling into enemy hands.
  • In addition, they spread information in order to prevent further assaults.

order to get

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • People had to go up the ranks in order to get promoted.
  • She kills a butterfly in order to get Natasha to cry on cue.
  • In this way, plants can identify where to go in order to get water.

order to provide

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Currently, Harrison trades stocks in order to provide for his family.
  • In order to provide this service, Everway teamed up with AffinityPath LLC.
  • This required the addition of booster stages in order to provide more takeoff thrust.
E.g.
  • The following list is partial in chronological order:
  • In chronological order of first (French) publication.
  • Below is a partial list in chronological order.

order to protect

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to protect his army's left flank, he dispatched Brig.
  • This is effective in order to protect the infant from predators.
  • Citigroup had obtained an exclusive agreement in order to protect itself.

order to keep

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This was required in order to keep up with the demanding schedule.
  • Such songs were also very rhythmic in order to keep the rowers together.
  • The gifts are carefully cared for in order to keep the "tendi" satisfied.

alphabetical order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first chapter uses standard alphabetical order.
  • Partners "(in alphabetical order)" Associate partners
  • Follows a list of other styles (in alphabetical order).

order to create

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She was chosen in order to create a game that was about women.
  • A user must have a Helios account in order to create an election.
  • He chose this technique in order to create layers for his painting.

law and order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Kshatriyas include those who maintain law and order.
  • The party stood for pro law and order, anti bureaucracy.
  • Wilburn's actions helped bring law and order to the region.

order to help

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Surgery can be done in order to help the nerve heal.
  • She also studied Braille in order to help a blind friend.
  • Materials were donated in order to help build the new clinic.

order to achieve

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to achieve this effect in "Primitive Crétin!"
  • Hines' early retirement was in order to achieve his other career, law.
  • The components interact with one another in order to achieve a common goal.

order to gain

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Massoud had resigned in order to gain peace.
  • In order to gain more experience, he spent the 2005–06 season on loan to FC Den Bosch.
  • The city purchased of land in the Owens Valley in order to gain access to water rights.

order to ensure

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hunter sends the police in order to ensure Callan is caught red-handed.
  • In order to ensure this, Stan decides to teach Arthur how to drive a bus.
  • It was coated in a clear wax in order to ensure that the natural finish remained.

order to save

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The body, in order to save costs, has flat windows.
  • May reveals herself to Alison, in order to save Normie.
  • She wanted the money in order to save her family's farm.

order to maintain

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They hoped to acquire needed supplies in order to maintain their army.
  • In order to maintain his amateur, he played without pay with Truckers.
  • In order to maintain secrecy, frequencies were changed at irregular intervals.

executive order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order issued by Lincoln on 1 January 1863.
  • He signed $2.5 billion executive order for water quality and Everglades restoration work.
  • The executive can be the source of certain types of law, such as a decree or executive order.

order to reduce

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • We may choose to help in order to reduce the arousal and distress.
  • This was introduced in order to reduce "additional fatigue issues".
  • Banks have adopted new technologies in order to reduce operating costs.

order to increase

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is done in order to increase their shelf life.
  • Squads can also be merged in order to increase their power.
  • In order to increase accuracy it has inertial guidance with TV/IR homing head.

order to improve

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Only some rooms were adapted in order to improve the exhibition conditions.
  • Thus, the squad faced clearance in order to improve the financial condition.
  • During the post-war years, the GATT was established in order to improve trade.

order to obtain

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • the narrow band) in order to obtain sufficient precision.
  • Old Ball itself would chase people in order to obtain money from them.
  • In order to obtain wax, the bird guides people to the nests of wild bees (i.e.

order to allow

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This policy existed in order to allow recruits who wanted to restart their lives to enlist.
  • Women volunteered in order to allow men to be freed from air defense work to go onto combat roles.
  • The government has been selling its stake in local airports in order to allow their privatization.

public order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Three people were arrested for public order offences.
  • Both women were suspected of public order violations.
  • 186 to 208 TITLE VIII Crimes against public order Arts.

order to promote

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It needs to be properly used in order to promote good Government.
  • A music video for the song was released in order to promote the album.
  • In order to promote the album, Cole announced the KOD Tour on May 8, 2018.

order of battle

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Union order of battle is listed separately.
  • The Confederate order of battle is listed separately.
  • The Union order of battle is shown separately.

order to take

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She stood up from her wheelchair in order to take her vows.
  • Players could also attack planets in order to take control of them.
  • Cardo and Leon resolve to join forces in order to take down Alakdan.

order to give

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The episode has been commissioned in order to give the series a proper finale.
  • After that, he was relegated to play in the B squad in order to give more experience.
  • He had put aside his work on his symphonic poem "Fatum" in order to give her all his attention.

first order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first order of 13 YB-40s was made in October 1942.
  • in the first order of approximation.
  • The first order for ten chassis was placed with AEC in 1935–1936.

order to find

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He rejected Sydney's contract in order to find another team.
  • In order to find out, he decides to join the operation in the field.
  • Unicellular organisms can move in order to find food or escape predators.

social order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This social order was divided into three classes.
  • It is started by describing a "natural" social order.
  • Like a servant, a yardman, someone very low in the social order.

order to meet

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Their objective is to infiltrate the cheerleading camp in order to meet girls.
  • About 15 MiG-29 fighters have been modernized in order to meet NATO standards.
  • In order to meet this request half way an information tablet on Heck’s past was added.

order to support

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to support herself and her family, Christine turned to writing.
  • Fly wings require bulky muscles in the abdomen in order to support them.
  • Expansion of the loop's capacity is needed in order to support an East Bayfront LRT.

order to preserve

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The reason for their defection was in order to preserve their status and wealth.
  • This now becomes clear that this is a selfish act in order to preserve their genes.
  • In order to preserve their culture, customs, and identity, the Padaung fled to Thailand.

order to become

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Bills must pass each house in order to become law.
  • Institutions must purchase stock in order to become a member.
  • He agreed to the project in order to become more financially stable.

running order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The lyrics in the booklet keep the correct running order.
  • The draw for the running order was held on 28 January 2009.
  • A number of E-units survive, many are in good running order.

order to determine

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • in order to determine if an address is associated with the credit card.
  • This matters in order to determine how culpable someone is for his actions.
  • A study which examines rock lichen in order to determine glacial retreat was begun in 1996.

restraining order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She was granted a restraining order against him.
  • He breached a restraining order and was held in prison.
  • Eventually, she obtained a restraining order against him.

order to secure

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to secure his position, he attempted to arrange a marriage with Douce's mother.
  • According to one theory Irene poisoned her stepson in order to secure the throne for Michael II.
  • Afterwards, Sadan held several meetings with US officials in order to secure Sharansky's release.

order to bring

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Then he stretched out his rod in order to bring on the first three plagues.
  • A number of changes were implemented in order to bring the bike up-to-date.
  • In order to bring the SC/ST colonies in the main stream so many projects are being planned.

order to build

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to build a railway, they demolished Banruo Temple.
  • The lodge incorporated in 1868 in order to build the building.
  • Houses were literally cut in half in order to build the four-lane street.

order to facilitate

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It extends to around 12 verses in order to facilitate its use in processions.
  • A noise-canceling microphone is included in order to facilitate video conferencing.
  • Formally, the ministry continued to exist until 1991 in order to facilitate transition.

restore order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • To restore order, one of the gods goes out to retrieve her.
  • To restore order, several soldiers were flogged and four hanged.
  • Bohun returned to the camp and tried to restore order, but in vain.

order to reach

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to reach 200 mph well before half-track, the launch acceleration approaches 8G's.
  • By means of a jetpack, he must fly to the surface of the planet in order to reach the villain.
  • These broadcastings were both in Hebrew and Yiddish in order to reach the widest audience possible.

order to accommodate

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to accommodate these areas, Pskov Governorate was created.
  • The chain uses halal-certified meat in order to accommodate Muslim customers.
  • Volos station was converted to dual gauge, in order to accommodate trains of the two branches.

order to raise

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He emigrated to France in order to raise money for his marriage.
  • She entered the Academy in order to raise her family's social status.
  • In February 1895, in order to raise a Universalist congregation, Rev.

order to establish

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • in order to establish a unified and viable identity.
  • On January 1, he issued an order to establish the Special Section.
  • Surveys started before the tests at Maralinga commenced in order to establish a baseline.

same order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The image of an element has the same order as that element.
  • All versions of the album present the same material, in the same order.
  • The same order appears in Minuscule 427, 734, Tertullian, and Chrysostom.

descending order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In the East Midlands it consists of (in descending order i.e.
  • These are listed in the following table, in descending order of population.

order to win

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to win power, the socialists had to overcome Parliament.
  • Pat embarks on a plan of self-improvement in order to win Nikki back.
  • In order to win the pennant, the Highlanders needed to win both games.

order to receive

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Postal Service in order to receive bulk-mailing rates.
  • He reluctantly accepts in order to receive his inheritance.
  • He had to write to Congress in order to receive pay for his work.

order of precedence

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The order of precedence of the laws applicable to the SE is clarified.
  • It is ranked fifth in the order of precedence in the Norwegian honours system.
  • He was placed first in order of precedence over Walter Leveson, his brother-in-law.

order to produce

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She finally signed a contract with Raks Müzik in order to produce four albums.
  • The following year, Head opened a new plant in Austria in order to produce more tennis rackets.
  • The fifths could be tempered more than in equal temperament, in order to produce better thirds.

issued an order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • On the Kerensky's ministry issued an order of political amnesty.
  • On January 1, he issued an order to establish the Special Section.
  • On 27 December, Smith issued an order authorizing recruitment in Britain.

order to continue

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hobbies require a certain level of passion in order to continue engaging in the hobby.
  • Currently they are looking to find a lead compound in order to continue these studies.
  • After Armistice, Hale extended her visa in order to continue working in devastated areas.

order to better

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The idea was to share reporting among the four stations in order to better cover the state.
  • They have a number of songs which are in English, in order to better reach an international audience.
  • It promotes dialogue and respect, as well as sensitization in order to better understand homosexuals.

working order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 452 in working order to the Tramway Historical Society.
  • 26975 of 1952) is preserved in working order.
  • Some are still preserved in working order.

second order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The commutators are second order differential operators from to .
  • This made thinkers look again at second order questions about ethics.
  • Only in a second order step a differentiation between materials becomes relevant.

order to focus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He retired in order to focus on his family.
  • In August 2014, Walter quit in order to focus on her acting career.
  • By 2007, he had left the Saputo Group in order to focus on the Impact.

order to pursue

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She left academia in 1982 in order to pursue a career as a full-time composer.
  • In February 2015, it was announced that she would leave "Coronation Street" in order to pursue other interests.
  • He had been offered a post as Minister to Siam in 1913, but declined in order to pursue the position in Peking.

order not

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order not to be caught alive, he killed himself.
  • In order not to violate the treaty, countries began to develop light cruisers.
  • 10th gate: Apep appears again, but chained in order not to harm Ra in his transit.

order to develop

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is divided into three or four divisions in order to develop equitable competition.
  • Gluhareff began working with the U.S. Navy in order to develop Rotary Drones in 1960.
  • In 2006–07, Ben Carter bought parcels in the area in order to develop the Streets of Buckhead.

order to stop

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to stop it, The Atom, grows to the same dimension to fight it.
  • In order to stop the disc the player simply needs to make contact with it.
  • In order to stop Eddington, Sisko decides he must do something truly villainous.

order to escape

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to escape the law of God, you must pay this money.
  • mountains and heavily forested territories) in order to escape foreign rule.
  • His family moved from Poland to Cologne, West Germany, in order to escape communism.

following order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The songs are performed in the following order:
  • The parading components march past in the following order:
  • The teams competed in the following order of female–male–female–male.

order to use

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to use standard NATO ammunition, the FH77B was developed.
  • In order to use his name or likeness, a company must deal directly with Bonds.
  • In order to use the system, users need to register and pay a 10 zł initial fee.

higher order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is self-exposure of a higher order."
  • In which case, it is called a higher order "G"-structure [Kobayashi].
  • Accuracy can be increased indefinitely by considering higher order terms.

new order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They created a new order, calling it Asparagales.
  • The introduction of a new order of church service was more difficult.
  • Dominic's new order was to be trained to preach in the vernacular languages.

order to pay

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She worked in a bank in order to pay for the music school.
  • In order to pay for the extra spending, governments issue debt.
  • In order to pay off her hospital bills, Sang-doo becomes a gigolo.

order to complete

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Some gadgets are required in order to complete certain missions.
  • In order to complete each section, the player needs to locate 10 energy balls.
  • You will also have to visit the depths of the lake in order to complete the game.

order to survive

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to survive, the host must return to human form to sleep and eat.
  • Outside the Stations, people grouped together under powerful leaders in order to survive.
  • Faced with mutiny, death and dishonor; Zoe must sacrifice her humanity in order to survive.

good order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Cells were expected to be kept tidy and in good order.
  • During this time the Turkish Army was able to withdraw in good order.
  • If the house was in good order, they would bring fertility and plenty.

order to understand

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • we access in order to understand and manipulate our material environment.
  • Maybe we need a story framed on that individual scale in order to understand it.
  • Matthew Arnold is an exemplary lens to use in order to understand these sympathies.

order to prepare

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Supposedly, he would play at least one game before a battle in order to prepare himself.
  • In order to prepare the locomotive for its 1851 trial run, Page went over $6000 into debt.
  • After his return from Bucharest, the artist continued to work in order to prepare another show.

reverse order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The final two episodes were played in reverse order.
  • The same top two medalist as in 2016, but in reverse order.
  • Lowering the weight: Performing the above steps in reverse order.

order to comply

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He sold his mandate in 2002 to Leopold Rosso in order to comply with the mandate of accumulation.
  • The UK Government passed the European Parliament (Representation) Act in 2003 in order to comply with the ruling.
  • Some scenes from the original version were modified or omitted in order to comply with Fox's standards and practices.

order to compete

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Pat did not participate in 1996 spring football practice in order to compete on the lacrosse team.
  • RO culture had to be recoded in order to compete with the "free" distribution made possible by the Internet.
  • Six years later it reformed as a club, in order to compete with other professional teams in the Community of Madrid.

placed an order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Schwarz Toy Store in NY, who placed an order.
  • Air Canada placed an order for the aircraft one day earlier.
  • In April 2016, Delta Air Lines placed an order for the aircraft.

order to study

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Canetti went back to Vienna in 1924 in order to study chemistry.
  • Brattle lived in London from 1682-1689 in order to study science.
  • In 1919 she returned to Berlin in order to study with Lovis Corinth.

maintain order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Trenchard also advocated a system of 'air control' to maintain order in Britain's colonial empire.
  • Elam (Common) struggles to maintain order and has to rely on Cullen's help, causing the town to shun him.
  • Several media reports from this period depicted him as unable to maintain order over an increasingly dysfunctional council.

gave the order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At midday Boulineau gave the order for retreat.
  • That evening, Thayer gave the order to abandon Fort Mifflin.
  • Captain Lüdecke gave the order to abandon and scuttle his vessel.

order to further

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to further his keeping, Marsh joined the University club.
  • He went to New Inn Hall, Oxford, principally in order to further his cricket career.
  • Instructions are also typically highly encoded in order to further enhance the code density.

order to graduate

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In order to graduate, students must obtain 21 credits by the end of their senior year.
  • Those who do not pass after several attempts can perform a project in order to graduate.

order to qualify

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Existing 4.85×44mm rounds had their neck manually stretched out 5mm in order to qualify for the test.
  • "The Black Knight" was the fourth film Alan Ladd made outside the US in order to qualify for a tax exemption.
  • In 1910 the English school was already recognized by the State, which was important in order to qualify for subsidies.

listed in order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The surnames are not listed in order of commonality.
  • The roller coasters are listed in order of opening dates.

necessary in order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The resource component is not necessary in order to contact a Jabber user.
  • This was necessary in order to be shooting during the winter season in Europe.
  • There, students can take the classes necessary in order to transfer to four-year college institutions.

order to form

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Many operations require one or more operands in order to form a complete instruction.
  • Compound symbols consist of two symbols being combined in order to form a new symbol.
  • The invisible section or "covert" is the syntax that is removed in order to form a one word sentence.

order to show

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This article, in order to show wave function phases, shows mostly graphs.
  • The nagaiyas share these diet restrictions in order to show their support.
  • Registered mail is often backstamped in order to show the chain of custody.

order to work

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ablative Polymers require movement of the boat in order to work.
  • By 2007 Bozaci left Atalier in order to work purely as an artist.
  • The first choice was go to college in order to work your life away at an office.

required in order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Some gadgets are required in order to complete certain missions.
  • This was required in order to keep up with the demanding schedule.
  • Some new philosophy beyond deconstruction would then be required in order to encompass the notion of critique.

order to join

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He moved back to Sweden in 2005 in order to join Helsingborgs IF.
  • He left Faros in order to join Alytus Dzūkija of the Lithuanian Basket League.
  • Alexander now fled to Arabia in order to join up with Zabdiel, but he was killed.

order to attract

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • SAF consistently tried to keep its membership dues low, in order to attract low-paid workers.
  • Amendments to Investment and Company law were introduced in order to attract foreign investors.
  • Margoschis started a non-vegetarian boarding section in 1884 in order to attract the caste Hindus.

order from left

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The five pieces on the third rank are called suns, and are marked with one to five suns in ascending order from left to right.
  • The five pieces on the first rank are called stars, and are marked with one to five stars in ascending order from left to right.
  • The five pieces on the second rank are called moons, and are marked with one to five moons in ascending order from left to right.

order to play

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Nice withdrew from the 1951 Latin Cup in order to play the Copa Rio.
  • Neal stated that he joined "Donny" in order to play first team football.
  • It demonstrates that in order to play, the device must be physically moved.
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