Poinsettia Point-blank

Point

Meanings and phrases

point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a geometric element that has position but no extension
  2. the precise location of something; a spatially limited location
  3. a brief version of the essential meaning of something
  4. an isolated fact that is considered separately from the whole; detail; item
  5. a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; degree; level; stage
  6. an instant of time; point in time
  7. the object of an activity
  8. a V shape; tip; peak
  9. a distinct part that can be specified separately in a group of things that could be enumerated on a list; item
  10. a very small circular shape; dot
  11. the unit of counting in scoring a game or contest
  12. a promontory extending out into a large body of water
  13. a style in speech or writing that arrests attention and has a penetrating or convincing quality or effect
  14. an outstanding characteristic; spot
  15. sharp end
  16. any of 32 horizontal directions indicated on the card of a compass; compass point
  17. the dot at the left of a decimal fraction; decimal point; percentage point
  18. a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts them and current flows to the spark plugs; distributor point; breaker point
  19. a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations; period; full stop; stop; full point
  20. a linear unit used to measure the size of type; approximately 1/72 inch
  21. one percent of the total principal of a loan; it is paid at the time the loan is made and is independent of the interest on the loan
  22. a V-shaped mark at one end of an arrow pointer; head
  23. the property of a shape that tapers to a sharp tip; pointedness
  24. a distinguishing or individuating characteristic
  25. the gun muzzle's direction; gunpoint
  26. a wall socket; power point

point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. indicate a place, direction, person, or thing; either spatially or figuratively; indicate; designate; show
  2. direct into a position for use; charge; level
  3. be oriented; orient
  4. direct the course; determine the direction of travelling; steer; maneuver; manoeuver; manoeuvre; direct; head; guide; channelize; channelise
  5. be a signal for or a symptom of; bespeak; betoken; indicate; signal
  6. sail close to the wind; luff
  7. mark (Hebrew words) with diacritics
  8. mark with diacritics
  9. mark (a psalm text) to indicate the points at which the music changes
  10. be positionable in a specified manner
  11. indicate the presence of (game) by standing and pointing with the muzzle
  12. repair the joints of bricks; repoint
  13. give a point to; sharpen; taper
  14. intend (something) to move towards a certain goal; target; aim; place; direct

Curie point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temperature above which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes paramagnetic; Curie temperature

McBurney 's point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point one third of the way along a line drawn from the hip to the umbilicus; the point of maximum sensitivity in acute appendicitis

West Point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. United States Army installation on the west bank of Hudson river to the north of New York City; site of United States Military Academy

alveolar point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. craniometric point that is the most anterior point in the midline on the alveolar process of the maxilla; prosthion; prostheon

auricular point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the craniometric point at the center of the opening of the external acoustic meatus; auriculare
n.
  1. a shipboard missile system

blue point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. oysters originally from Long Island Sound but now from anywhere along the northeastern seacoast; usually eaten raw; bluepoint
  2. small edible oyster typically from the southern shore of Long Island; bluepoint

blue point Siamese

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. Siamese cat having a bluish cream-colored body and dark grey points

boiling point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level; boil
  2. being highly angry or excited; ready to boil over
E.g.
  • The element with the lowest boiling point is helium.
  • Thus, the boiling point is dependent on the pressure.
  • Cryogenic fluids with their boiling point in kelvins.

breaker point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts them and current flows to the spark plugs; distributor point; point

breaking point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (psychology) stress at which a person breaks down or a situation becomes crucial
  2. the degree of tension or stress at which something breaks
E.g.
  • The year 2003 is a breaking point in the DUT Racing philosophy.
  • When she belted, her wide vibrato wobbled to the breaking point.
  • The murder of James Emma was considered the breaking point for Gerard.
n.
  1. one of the four main compass points

case in point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an example that is used to justify similar occurrences at a later time; precedent

celestial point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)

compass point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of 32 horizontal directions indicated on the card of a compass; point

craniometric point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a landmark on the skull from which craniometric measurements can be taken

critical point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a crisis situation or point in time when a critical decision must be made; juncture; crossroads
E.g.
  • The critical point is 7.38 MPa at 31.1 °C.
  • The boiling point cannot be increased beyond the critical point.
  • The critical point of the mixture lies at "T" = 411 K and "P" ≈ 15000 kPa.

data point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an item of factual information derived from measurement or research; datum

decimal point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the dot at the left of a decimal fraction; percentage point; point

dew point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temperature at which the water vapor in the air becomes saturated and condensation begins
E.g.
  • Membrane air dryers depress the incoming dew point.
  • Most dryers have a challenge air dew point and pressure specification.
  • The dew point is a temperature at which a vapor condenses into a liquid.

diamond point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a very hard small point made from a diamond

distributor point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts them and current flows to the spark plugs; breaker point; point

dry point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a print produced by dry point engraving
  2. a steel needle for engraving without acid on a bare copper plate

end point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a place where something ends or is complete; endpoint; termination; terminus
  2. the final point in a process; resultant
E.g.
  • The route network has no implied start or end point.
  • Endpoint An endpoint, end-point or end point may refer to:
  • This includes the northern end point of the Cooloola Great Walk.

equinoctial point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (astronomy) either of the two celestial points at which the celestial equator intersects the ecliptic; equinox

exclamation point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a punctuation mark (!) used after an exclamation; exclamation mark

extra point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown; point after; point after touchdown
E.g.
  • With the extra point, Nevada took the lead, 7–6.
  • He also converted 35 of 36 extra point attempts.
  • The extra point was missed, and the Bearcats led 6–0.

extreme point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the point located farthest from the middle of something; extreme; extremum

flash point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. point at which something is ready to blow up; flashpoint
  2. the lowest temperature at which the vapor of a combustible liquid can be ignited in air; flashpoint

focal point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point of convergence of light (or other radiation) or a point from which it diverges; focus
  2. the concentration of attention or energy on something; focus; focusing; focussing; direction; centering
  3. a central point or locus of an infection in an organism; focus; nidus
E.g.
  • The pond provides the focal point within the park.
  • It served as the focal point of Hyde Park social life.
  • The building provides a focal point for Thibault Square.
n.
  1. an index of the relation between any two sets of scores that can both be represented on ordered binary dimensions (e.g., male-female); phi coefficient; phi correlation

freezing point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid; melting point
E.g.
  • Temperatures often fall near freezing point in December and January .
  • By the end of November, temperatures usually range around the freezing point.
  • Work by others showed that water boils about 180 degrees above its freezing point.

full point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations; period; point; full stop; stop

geographic point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point on the surface of the Earth; geographical point

geographical point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point on the surface of the Earth; geographic point

grade point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a numerical value assigned to a letter grade received in a course taken at a college or university multiplied by the number of credit hours awarded for the course
E.g.
  • Consider also the grade point average.
  • In 1955, he graduated with the third-highest grade point average in his class of 73.
  • Students must earn at least a 2.0 grade point average overall and a 2.0 in their major.

grade point average

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a measure of a student's academic achievement at a college or university; calculated by dividing the total number of grade points received by the total number attempted; GPA
E.g.
  • Consider also the grade point average.
  • In 1955, he graduated with the third-highest grade point average in his class of 73.
  • Students must earn at least a 2.0 grade point average overall and a 2.0 in their major.

gros point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a needlepoint stitch covering two horizontal and two vertical threads
  2. needlepoint embroidery done with large stitches

high point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the most enjoyable part of a given experience
E.g.
  • The game's audio was also a high point for reviewers.
  • The high point of the range is an unnamed peak at at .
  • It was the high point for me; a happy time."

in point of fact

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in reality or actuality; in fact; as a matter of fact
n.
  1. a punctuation mark (?) placed at the end of a sentence to indicate a question; question mark

intersection point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point where lines intersect; intersection; point of intersection

jugal point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the craniometric point at the union of the frontal and temporal processes of the zygomatic bone; jugale

jumping-off point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a beginning from which an enterprise is launched; springboard; point of departure

limit point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the mathematical value toward which a function goes as the independent variable approaches infinity; limit; point of accumulation

lubber 's point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a fixed line on a ship's compass indicating its heading; lubber's line; lubber line; lubber's mark

make a point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally; make sure

match point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (tennis) the final point needed to win a match (especially in tennis)
E.g.
  • Davydenko converted his second match point to win at 7–4.
  • Astralis got to match point at 15-9 heading into the 25th round.
  • Astralis took two rounds, FaZe took one, and then Astralis got to match point.

melting point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid; freezing point
E.g.
  • The melting point is roughly estimated as 2000 °C.
  • Its melting point is above the range of metal forges.
  • As expected for a boride, it has a high melting point.
n.
  1. (computer science) a unit for measuring the speed of a computer system; megaflop; MFLOP

navel point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the center point or middle of something; navel

on that point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in that matter; there; in that respect

orbital point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the craniometric point at the lowest point on the lower edge of the orbit; orbitale

pedal point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a sustained bass note; pedal

percentage point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the dot at the left of a decimal fraction; decimal point; point
E.g.
  • Turnout rose by a percentage point on the previous year, to 37.2%.
  • Turnout fell by a percentage point on the previous year, to 36.6%.
  • This is akin to the difference between percentage and percentage point.

petit point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a small diagonal needlepoint stitch; tent stitch
  2. needlepoint done with small stitches

point after

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown; point after touchdown; extra point
n.
  1. in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown; point after; extra point

point duty

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the control of traffic by a policeman stationed at an intersection

point in time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an instant of time; point
E.g.
  • This total was measured at a single point in time.
  • It could have literally fallen over at any point in time."
  • At a point in time, he was a co- host to the Upside Down Show.

point jam

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. jam a narrow band of frequencies

point lace

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. lace worked with a needle in a buttonhole stitch on a paper pattern; needlepoint

point man

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. someone who is the forefront of an important enterprise
  2. a soldier who goes ahead of a patrol

point mutation

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (genetics) a mutation due to an intramolecular reorganization of a gene; gene mutation
n.
  1. the mathematical value toward which a function goes as the independent variable approaches infinity; limit; limit point

point of apoapsis

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (astronomy) the point in an orbit farthest from the body being orbited; apoapsis

point of departure

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a place from which an enterprise or expedition is launched; jumping-off place
  2. a beginning from which an enterprise is launched; springboard; jumping-off point
E.g.
  • This fact represents the point of departure of the ESS.
  • This work served as the point of departure for 'Kinopravda' ".
  • The Lowry model provided a point of departure for work in a number of places.

point of entry

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a port in the United States where customs officials are stationed to oversee the entry and exit of people and merchandise; port of entry

point of honor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a concern that seriously reflects on your honor
n.
  1. a point where lines intersect; intersection; intersection point

point of no return

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a line that when crossed permits of no return and typically results in irrevocable commitment; Rubicon

point of order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a question as to whether the current proceedings are allowed by parliamentary procedure

point of periapsis

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (astronomy) the point in an orbit closest to the body being orbited; periapsis

point of reference

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an indicator that orients you generally; reference point; reference
E.g.
  • "Time" once used the park as point of reference for the city of Chicago.
  • The dilemma is a basic point of reference in technology assessment debates.
  • Lucas also used Humphrey Bogart as a point of reference in his development notes.

point of view

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a mental position from which things are viewed; viewpoint; stand; standpoint
  2. the spatial property of the position from which something is observed
E.g.
  • He also stated, "I understand their point of view.
  • This leads by no means to a single point of view.
  • This is a very common point of view in chemistry.

point out

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. make or write a comment on; comment; notice; remark
  2. point out carefully and clearly; signalize; signalise; call attention
  3. present and urge reasons in opposition; remonstrate

point source

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a concentrated source (especially of radiation or pollution) that is spatially constricted
E.g.
  • They also are a point source of light.
  • The wavefront of electromagnetic waves emitted from a point source (such as a light bulb) is a sphere.
  • They determined that the point source was a solitary star being magnified more than 2,000 times by gravitational lensing.

point system

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a system of evaluation based on awarding points according to rules
  2. a system of graduating sizes of type in multiples of the point
  3. a system of writing or printing using patterns of raised dots that can be read by touch
E.g.
  • The point system changed over the years.
  • The dance point system, which determines grade, remains unchanged.
  • The same point system is used.

point the way

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. indicate the right path or direction

point up

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. emphasize, especially by identification

point woman

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a woman who is the forefront of an important enterprise

power point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wall socket; point

pressure point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of several points on the body where the pulse can be felt and where pressure on an underlying artery will control bleeding from that artery at a more distal point
  2. where problems or difficulties are likely to occur
  3. an area on the skin that is highly sensitive to pressure

rallying point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point or principle on which scattered or opposing groups can come together
E.g.
  • The accessible goal set forth in the “Call” quickly became a popular rallying point.
  • Its demolition became an early rallying point for the conservation movement in Sydney.
  • The newspaper was a rallying point for representatives of various petty-bourgeois parties.

reference point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an indicator that orients you generally; point of reference; reference
E.g.
  • This reference point naturally takes the name earth or ground.
  • There was just no reference point in the culture to compare it."
  • The melting point of gallium is used as a temperature reference point.

saturation point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (chemistry) the stage at which a substance will receive no more of another substance in solution or in a vapor

selling point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a characteristic of something that is up for sale that makes it attractive to potential customers
E.g.
  • One particular selling point was the availability of homesteads.
  • One major selling point of the Galaxy and S-MAX is the "FoldFlatSystem".
  • Another major selling point of these materials is their lack of need for paint.

set point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (tennis) the final point needed to win a set in tennis

starting point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. earliest limiting point; terminus a quo
E.g.
  • NTS is the starting point for UK gas distribution.
  • There is no clear starting point of their dominance.
  • It is also the starting point of Italia Avenue.

sticking point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point at which an impasse arises in progress toward an agreement or a goal

stopping point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the temporal end; the concluding time; finale; finis; finish; last; conclusion; close
E.g.
  • The Microphones was completed, or at least at a good stopping point.
  • It is also now a well known stopping point for visiting pleasure craft.
  • The island was also a stopping point during monsoon season for ship repair.

strong point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an asset of special worth or utility; forte; strong suit; long suit; metier; specialty; speciality; strength
E.g.
  • A strong point of the game was its models.
  • Plot and dialogue was not a strong point of DeMille's films.
  • His biggest strong point was his uncanny ability to score goals.

suspension point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (usually plural) one of a series of points indicating that something has been omitted or that the sentence is incomplete

talking point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an especially persuasive point helping to support an argument or discussion

terminal point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. final or latest limiting point; terminus ad quem; limit

topographic point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a point located with respect to surface features of some region; place; spot
n.
  1. (computer science) a unit for measuring the speed of a computer system; teraflop

turning point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend; landmark; watershed
  2. the intersection of two streets; corner; street corner
E.g.
  • This turned out to be the turning point in the War.
  • This signaled a turning point in Turkish history.
  • That would be a turning point in Lorković's life.

vanishing point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the point beyond which something disappears or ceases to exist
  2. the appearance of a point on the horizon at which parallel lines converge

vantage point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a place from which something can be viewed; viewpoint
E.g.
  • One can enjoy the panoramic views of the landscape from this vantage point.
  • The highest man-made vantage point sits 555 metres up on the 148th floor of Burj Khalifa.
  • It acts as a superb vantage point for, and backdrop to, views across Thirlmere reservoir.

vowel point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a mark placed below or near a consonant (as in Hebrew or Arabic) to indicate the spoken vowel

weak point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an attribute that is inadequate or deficient
E.g.
  • The weak point remains and the anodic corrosion is ongoing.
  • Its only weak point proved to be, not unlike Chimera, having a spear flung down its throat.
  • The weak point of a CIT is that it demands that all user interactions be logged into the system.

well point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a perforated tube driven into the ground to collect water from the surrounding area; wellpoint

zero point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the point on a scale from which positive or negative numerical quantities can be measured; zero

highest point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The view from the UK's highest point is extensive.
  • The highest point was measured at above sea level.
  • Cato Island is the highest point in the Territory.

point guard

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Standing at , she plays at the point guard position.
  • Standing at , he plays the point guard position.

single point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This total was measured at a single point in time.
  • This leads by no means to a single point of view.
  • the sections intersect at that single point).

point during

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The plane caught fire at some point during the sequence.
  • At one point during the shot, Petricca plays the keytar.
  • Hops may be added at more than one point during the boil.

point between

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A coin is placed at some point between the layers.
  • It was closed at some point between 1948-55.
  • At some point between 1336 and 1348 he moved to Kilkenny.

lowest point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Black Sea coast is the country's lowest point.
  • The lowest point is the English Channel (sea level).
  • The lowest point has height from the sea level.

each point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At each point, a potential leader position is simulated.
  • The velocity of the air at each point defines a vector field.
  • Then each point in "X" can be identified with an evaluation function on "C".

fixed point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A contraction mapping has at most one fixed point.
  • We exclude the origin, which is a fixed point in "H".
  • Points in this straight line run into the fixed point.

meeting point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The meeting point is known as Azhimokam in Malayalam.
  • It is considered a typical meeting point for the locals.
  • When Kate reaches the meeting point, she finds no one there.

floating point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • No floating point support is provided.
  • Each processor will have two thread units and a floating point unit.
  • These may process data using fixed-point arithmetic or floating point.

entry point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ringo directs Hilda and Cedric to find an entry point.
  • Fox Bay is also a customs entry point for West Falkland.
  • Melli is the main entry point for West and South Sikkim districts.

point when

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was at this point when a now-infamous incident took place.
  • I consider real power the point when you're not afraid to fail...
  • She stated: "There was a point when I asked myself if I really had a future here.

every point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The identity function has degree one at every point.
  • For every point scored a team moves forward one square.
  • Then almost every point of "A" returns to "A" infinitely often.

access point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The most common access point is from the northern end.
  • "Qafa e Gurit" () is the local access point to the lake.
  • The ferry terminal is the access point to Enggano Island.

low point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 1973 was the low point for March in Formula One.
  • 1997 was the low point of Agassi's career.
  • A low point was reached in July when only nine cars started the race.

no point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There is no point in closing our eyes about such things".
  • However, no point releases will be made.
  • At no point was there a question who was in operational control while on patrol.

central point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Himo is a central point town of the Kilimanjaro district.
  • In a radial structure, main roads converge on a central point.
  • Only the central point is left vacant in the beginning of the game.

certain point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "I would lift my voice at a certain point so what I said could not be cut.
  • At a certain point every month, her appearance changes to a different person.
  • For every bracket of marks a student gets, a certain point score is allocated.

crossing point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hamzabeyli crossing point is mainly aimed for commercial traffic (e.g.
  • It is the last public crossing point before the Thames reaches the sea.
  • Hamzabeyli border crossing point was previously in use in Ottoman times.

point behind

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Donovan agreed, saying there was "a valid moral point behind it."
  • At Zurich he finished fourth at 11½, a half point behind Euwe and Flohr.
  • At the 'Politiken' event of 2008, he finished just a half point behind the leaders.

first point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first point of her NCAA career came on October 29, 2011.
  • Hartford would hold on for the 1-1 draw, the first point in club history.
  • The first point of the theory must state the social location of the authority.

same point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Don Lavoie makes the same point in reverse.
  • Causing three deaths at the same point in a matter of months.
  • The same point system is used.

northernmost point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • West of the Plöckenstein is Austria's northernmost point.
  • The northernmost point administered by India lies in Ladakh.
  • This district contains the northernmost point of Northeast India.

southernmost point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Gedser Odde is the southernmost point in Denmark.
  • The southernmost point in mainland Italy lies in Palizzi.
  • It is located near the southernmost point of mainland Alaska.

halfway point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • SR 520 passes under a directional sign at its halfway point.
  • Klatt broke a bone in his foot at the halfway point of the series.
  • The halfway point of the NWWR is approximately at Goodsoil, Saskatchewan.

point of contact

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In physical terms, a shock wave originates from the point of contact.
  • In Connecticut, there is a point of contact for a JRB in each city and town.
  • The Alumni Relations Office (ARO) serves as the point of contact for IMU alumni.

until that point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • For five years until that point she had been bedridden.
  • Subaru sales had been declining up until that point in North American market.
  • Up until that point the official Christian presence in the region was Greek Orthodox.

point average

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Consider also the grade point average.
  • In 1955, he graduated with the third-highest grade point average in his class of 73.
  • Students must earn at least a 2.0 grade point average overall and a 2.0 in their major.

given point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At any given point the parade took 13 to 15 minutes to pass.
  • A key constraint applies to the set of tuples in a table at any given point in time.
  • So the isometries that fix a given point form a group isomorphic to the orthogonal group.

bonus point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Unions can also win their side a respectable bonus point.
  • A bonus point is awarded for wiping out the entire other team.
  • If the team batting second wins the match in 40 overs, it gains a bonus point.

main point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The main point of criticism was the unoriginality of the film.
  • The main point of contention was wind.
  • More important, such a selection would obscure the main point.

point of contention

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • One major point of contention had to do with land use rights.
  • The main point of contention was wind.
  • The term's connotation is a point of contention within the LGBT community.

point total

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His point total was the highest in NBA history by a player in a five-game series.
  • Basic strategy is based upon a player's point total and the dealer's visible card.
  • The team with the highest point total following the final round wins the competition.

made a point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He also made a point of meeting "little Eduardo" weeks later.
  • When he built his first steel plant, he made a point of naming it after Thomson.
  • During a deposition, Ewing was reported to have made a point of avoiding a handshake with Clinton.

widest point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is north-south and east-west at its widest point.
  • It is about long and across at its widest point.
  • The headstone is wide (at its widest point) and high.

just one point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I want to emphasize just one point, which should interest you particularly as students.
  • The Honey Bear is finally just one point away from the relegation zone of the Liga 2 East Region.
  • Lewis Hamilton won by just one point in 2008, with Jenson Button winning the following year, in 2009.

point before

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At some point before 1730, this monument fell into disrepair.
  • He had become estranged from his wife at some point before his trial.
  • It is the last public crossing point before the Thames reaches the sea.

point near

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its average width is 1.7 miles (2.7 km), and it is at its widest point near Aurora.
  • The expanding gasses would drive the piston up the tube until the reached a point near the top.
  • After noon, the Midlanders and Royal Grenadiers moved forward again, to a point near the Batoche Cemetery.

point ahead

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They finished half a point ahead of a field that included three former World Champions.
  • A year later, Pescadores narrowly lost the title to Agrária, who finished a point ahead.
  • However, Juventus still managed to win the league, one point ahead of second-placed Hellas.

important point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The most important point for sightseeing is the village belfry.
  • It an important point in the trade routes passing between Peshawar and Swat.
  • This collection of buildings is representative of that important point in time."

point forward

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its sturdy tusks are curved out and point forward.
  • She primarily worked in radiography and radiotherapy from this point forward.
  • From that point forward, preparations continued at a highly accelerated, almost frenzied pace.

key point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Residency criterion is the key point for the taxes.
  • A further key point was Marx's theory of alienation.
  • It takes away attention from the key point.

another point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A rare historic Jewish cemetery is another point of interest.
  • The low win rate of ACC teams in general was another point of interest.
  • Let "C" be another point, also satisfying the ratio and lying on segment "AB".

code point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In Unicode, the code point for "bicycle" is 0x1F6B2.
  • Unicode provides the Fahrenheit symbol at code point .
  • 73, encoded by Unicode at code point U+1233A).

point of sale

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • at point of sale only).
  • EFTPOS (electronic fund transfer at point of sale) in New Zealand is highly popular.
  • They may be connected to computerized point of sale networks using any type of protocol.

plot point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • More recently, Reinach's suicide is a plot point in Eric Zencey's novel "Panama".
  • Van Spall and TWoP also noted the plot point of the T-888's mission to kill the governor of California.
  • The 1950 Broadway musical "Guys and Dolls" features a major plot point revolving around a floating craps game.

point along

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Decisions were made to install a toll point along that road in 2007.
  • The culmination also refers to the highest point along any geologic structure.
  • Passengers board and alight at any point along the route by notifying the driver.

only one point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • So, there can be only one point, and that's to spend it.
  • He got sacked on 28 October 2019, after winning only one point of the possible nine in three games.
  • a 3–0 defeat away to Dunfermline meant United had picked up only one point in their opening two league matches.

transfer point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Instead, it served as a transfer point between U6 and several lines.
  • Beginning in 1862 Fort Monroe was also used as a transfer point for mail exchange.
  • North Hawthorne remained a transfer point to the Hawthorne trolley line until 1926, when the line was abandoned.

price point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • With a large library of games and a low price point, the 2600 continued to sell into the late 1980s.
  • mouse has a lower price point than the Intelliscope despite possessing 32kb of onboard memory and Macro A.I.
  • By the 2000s high-quality printers of this sort had fallen under the $100 price point and became commonplace.

point blank

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • An 8-year-old girl was shot in the head at point blank range.
  • He shot point blank at Mackenzie but the pistol misfired and the rebel leader was unharmed.
  • Mella's wounds were made from point blank range, and neither Modotti or Vidali were injured.

westernmost point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Heiligensee has the westernmost point of Reinickendorf.
  • Highway 5 has its westernmost point on the shores of the lake.
  • Near the westernmost point of Achill, Achill Head, is Keem Bay.

point of interest

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The DS touch screen was a primary point of interest.
  • A rare historic Jewish cemetery is another point of interest.
  • The low win rate of ACC teams in general was another point of interest.

until this point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It reads "Work of Praülos until this point".
  • She is smiling, which was never seen by the show's audiences until this point.
  • Up until this point facsimile machines were very expensive and hard to operate.

major point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • One major point of contention had to do with land use rights.
  • The concept of ecosystem collapse is still a major point of debate.
  • The Arts District in downtown is also expected to become a major point of growth.

transit point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Malaysia discovered that militants were using Sabah as a transit point.
  • It is an important transit point for all kinds of goods, as the numerous lorries at the border well illustrate.
  • The port of Kronstadt is currently serving as a transit point for the import in Russia of radioactive waste through the Baltic Sea.

particular point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Unlike some other of his works, it did not seek to prove any particular point.
  • At any distance along the adjacent side, a line perpendicular to it intersects the hypotenuse at a particular point.
  • A fundamental key to conventional Warfare is the concentration of force at a particular point (the [der] Schwerpunkt).

deepest point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At its deepest point the cave is above sea level.
  • It is approximately at its deepest point.
  • At its deepest point the tunnel is 400 feet below ground level.

point of time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I was looking at predominately my film at that point of time.
  • This was the point of time where his life started to turn around.
  • PVP is planning to release Tamil version at a later point of time."

major turning point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The film remains as a major turning point in his career.
  • The contest was a major turning point for female bodybuilding.
  • The sack of Constantinople is a major turning point in medieval history.

point above

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • At the time Gateshead were 19th in the table, one point above the relegation zone.
  • trains travel way back in point above the Tomorrowland Speedway before turning south.
  • The highest point above sea level is the Mount Inhaca on the north-eastern shoreline.

point process

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Binomial process A binomial process is a special point process in probability theory.
  • Simple point process A simple point process is a special type of point process in probability theory.
E.g.
  • The Carlins chose Montreal, Quebec, Canada, as the official starting point of their circumnavigation attempt.
  • Shin-Totsukawa Station Shin-Totsukawa Station is the terminus of the Sasshō Line from , and is situated 76.5 km from the official starting point of the line at .
  • She had a mixture of experienced crew and teams of disadvantaged youth on board, including: The first leg took just over two weeks to reach Gibraltar, the official starting point for the Blue Water Round the World Rally.

point onwards

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • From this point onwards a trail should be visible.
  • From this point onwards Podge was joined by his brother Rodge.
  • From this point onwards Marianka was managed by the local diocese.

easternmost point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Rose Atoll is the easternmost point of the territory.
  • The easternmost point is Cape Spear, Newfoundland (47°31′N, 52°37′W) .
  • At longitude 55°37'15" W, it is the easternmost point of continental North America.

point of origin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Jasta 45 disbanded on 26 November 1918 at its point of origin.
  • The Sertoli cells are the point of origin for anti-Müllerian hormone.
  • The value of the coordinates depends on the choice of the initial point of origin.

tipping point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The tipping point came on 12 May 1860.
  • The colliery's proposed closure was a tipping point in the 1984-85 miner's strike.
  • The tipping point came in 1967 with the appointment of Bob Howsam as general manager.

point just

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The railway tunnel passes under the River Severn from a point just south of New Passage.
  • At the point just before the girl and the valet are about to kill the count, Boconnion halts the play.
  • From there the river used to continue flowing southerly, at one point just edging the area where Plaza del Caribe now stands.

starting point guard

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But then, he was promoted as the team's starting point guard when former no.
  • Blake continued as the starting point guard with Telfair coming off the bench.
  • Cole is the starting point guard for the University of North Carolina Tar Heels.

later point

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • PVP is planning to release Tamil version at a later point of time."
  • At some later point in medieval Europe celery displaced alexanders.
  • They constructed this new house at some later point, likely around 1910.

point within

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The pond provides the focal point within the park.
  • The state of the system can be represented as a point within that space.
  • Margery Hill is the highest marked point within the boundaries of Sheffield.
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