Quitclaim Quito

Quite

Meanings and phrases

quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a degree (not used with a negative); rather
  2. to the greatest extent; completely
  3. of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind (not used with a negative); quite a; quite an
  4. actually or truly or to an extreme

quite a

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind (not used with a negative); quite; quite an

quite a little

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; batch; deal; flock; good deal; great deal; hatful; heap; lot; mass; mess; mickle; mint; mountain; muckle; passel; peck; pile; plenty; pot; raft; sight; slew; spate; stack; tidy sum; wad

quite an

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. of an unusually noticeable or exceptional or remarkable kind (not used with a negative); quite; quite a

not quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I am not quite turning into a serious actress.
  • It's a start, but it's not quite the girl."
  • I'm not quite an atheist and it worries me.

quite different

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The versions are quite different from one another.
  • The rest of the song, however, is quite different.
  • This machine was quite different from Massey's.

quite common

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Fog is quite common from late December to late January.
  • Pork is quite common; beef and chicken are also popular.
  • In sports, booing by fans is quite common.

quite similar

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The method of averaged projections is quite similar.
  • This species is quite similar to "Potentilla sterilis".
  • The techniques observed in all of them are quite similar.

quite popular

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Newspapers are quite popular in the Czech Republic.
  • Swimming is a quite popular sport in the Faroe Islands.
  • Nicotine gums were already quite popular with consumers.

quite a few

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Moreover, quite a few of these letters are of essay length.
  • However, quite a few cartoonists (e.g.
  • ""I sang on quite a few tracks; I sang on Rock 'N' Roll Is King.

quite well

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But for these fifteen months I have been quite well.
  • The single had fared quite well in Australia.
  • It is claimed that he was "never quite well afterwards".

never quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is claimed that he was "never quite well afterwards".
  • You're never quite sure what you're going to get with him.
  • In underside, the ocelli are smaller and never quite developed.

quite large

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Individual pods of graphite could be quite large.
  • This town was quite large and covered several acres.
  • Prey fish targeted by bald eagles are often quite large.

became quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He became quite proficient, advancing mostly on his own.
  • The area became quite industrialised after the tunnel opened.
  • During the Eocene, plants and marine faunas became quite modern.

quite a bit

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • So you will see her clashing with Angie quite a bit.
  • The game changed quite a bit throughout its development.
  • He said the film "transformed quite a bit" from the rough cut.

quite some time

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "I've been playing it for quite some time.
  • Maria has been involved with Pedro's son, Hermano, for quite some time.
  • He has been saving for quite some time and only has enough for one part.

quite often

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They are also quite often kept as pets by locals.
  • Such recalls once occurred quite often.
  • The letters ⟨e⟩ and ⟨r⟩ are also quite often found in ligature.

quite small

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The number of letters in an alphabet can be quite small.
  • The mounds of the second group were all quite small, under high.
  • His production was quite small.

quite successful

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The farm was quite successful under his leadership.
  • The Vietnam-era jungle boots were quite successful.
  • The F-101B proved to be a quite successful interceptor.

quite rare

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Fossils are quite rare, except in the lowest beds.
  • However, this accent is quite rare in the region today.
  • There were about 8,000 built but it is now becoming quite rare.

become quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Baccarat has become quite famous at the royal houses.
  • The issue has become quite controversial and political.
  • But, in time, they might become quite a formidable force."

still quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • While not as widespread as in the U.S., is still quite popular.
  • It is, however, still quite lethal.
  • While I don't salivate over it now in 2002, it's still quite good."

quite possibly

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • By the age of 29, he had performed in at least 35 plays, quite possibly many more.
  • They described it as "quite possibly one of the system's most ambitious designs yet."
  • David Levy, however, criticized this edition, saying that it could create "quite possibly false" traditions.

quite distinct

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is quite distinct from any other Aramaic variety.
  • They are quite distinct from the eastern dialects and Imperial Aramaic.
  • But up to the 19th century both islands must have had a quite distinct language.

quite high

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • These results are quite high for Ukrainian journals.
  • In academia the association enjoys quite high esteem.
  • The long-run price elasticity of supply is quite high.

quite close

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is also quite close to its parent peak, Blanca Peak.
  • The left field fence was apparently quite close to home plate.
  • In reality, however, the Kagura were quite close to being stateless.

quite a lot

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • And in addition, the product is actually quite a lot.
  • Tockholes itself has quite a lot of history.
  • "It gave me quite a lot of courage."

quite difficult

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Life at the lighthouse was also said to be quite difficult.
  • This detraction from Brexit, however, has been quite difficult.
  • This made it quite difficult to tell whose paintings where whose.

quite good

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Only one thing saved me – the idea that I'm a quite good singer."
  • While I don't salivate over it now in 2002, it's still quite good."
  • Males are quite good fliers.

often quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Prey fish targeted by bald eagles are often quite large.
  • Attitudes in developing countries are often quite different.
  • They are often quite colorful and some are kept in aquariums.

quite low

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • As they are no longer heavily persecuted, adult mortality is quite low.
  • Originally the disk capacity was quite low and has been improved in one of several ways.
  • Because of this, the village's population is quite low, and agricultural production has fallen.

quite clear

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The separation of forces and moments may be quite clear.
  • The generalization now becomes quite clear.
  • It is quite clear throughout this how severe the invasion is.

quite possible

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is quite possible that Ammonius Saccas taught both Origens.
  • On the prior hand, it is quite possible that the K is held by West.
  • It is quite possible to write a feature story in the style of a news story.

quite young

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Pessoa started using pen names quite young.
  • Kepler-51b is quite young at a few hundred million years old.
  • When she was quite young, her parents moved to Providence, Rhode Island.

actually quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • And in addition, the product is actually quite a lot.
  • It's actually quite a hardcore song."
  • Despite this, the figures were actually quite fragile and prone to breakage.

quite so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • More precise views, however, require definitions of continents, which in the case of Asia are not quite so facile.
  • He did not play quite so often the following year, but nevertheless managed three five-wicket hauls in first-class innings.
  • The view just past it is not quite so sweeping, but also takes in Hunter Mountain, the Catskill's second highest peak, to the west.

quite a number

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Some of the tomb also have a TT-designation, but quite a number do not.
  • In fact, Plato produced quite a number of anachronisms in many of his dialogues.
  • More than 160 of the hills of Dartmoor have the word "tor" in their name but quite a number do not.

quite variable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The larvae are quite variable.
  • These colorful reef fishes have a complex and quite variable color pattern.
  • Information gathered from [Green Valley Lake Homepage] The weather is quite variable.

quite complex

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Spreader design and tuning can be quite complex.
  • Models can range from relatively simple to quite complex:
  • The boundary between the two regions is quite complex in places.

quite likely

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is quite likely that overhead line crossings of broad waters can be replaced with underwater cables.
  • Prince Munenaga led a turbulent life, which quite likely served as an impetus for his poetic sensibility.
  • Since low-energy recoils just above the threshold only produce close Frenkel pairs, recombination is quite likely.

quite simply

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A lot of the papers coming out were quite simply wrong.
  • He is, quite simply, the most powerful and capable Wizard on the planet."
  • "The Times" called his stage personality "impish", writing: "He was, quite simply, a phenomenon.

quite simple

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The logging process was quite simple.
  • Both characters and enemies had static battle sprites, and the interface was quite simple.
  • Known as a top-down formation scenario, this theory is quite simple yet no longer widely accepted.

quite early

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The term internal working model, however, was coined quite early by Craik (1943).
  • Reactions were anything but uniform, and proponents of various ideologies attempted to appropriate his work quite early.
  • At some stage, probably quite early on, he joined the "Building Workers' Union" (""Syndicat Unique du bâtiment"" / SUB).

quite the same

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He wasn't quite the same once the game got going."
  • In this episode an astronaut returns from a voyage to find the world not quite the same as he remembers it.
  • A guard is not quite the same thing as a type declaration; guards are optional and can specify constraints.

quite long

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The tails are quite long compared to their size, .
  • The eyes are small and antennas are quite long.
  • Moreover, the cycle time is quite long, approximately 28 seconds.

quite easily

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Bob "the Beast" Sapp won the Japan GP quite easily.
  • Basic accommodation is quite easily available.
  • He seems to understand the Italian language quite easily.

quite unlike

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Many of these species look quite unlike the commercial decapod shrimp that are eaten as seafood.
  • The platyrrhine primate fossil record is relatively sparse, quite unlike that of caviomorph rodents.
  • It all comes together to make "I Am Alive" an uncompromising game of survival, quite unlike anything else on the Xbox 360."

quite sure

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • You're never quite sure what you're going to get with him.
  • But, everything was new and they weren't quite sure what to do.
  • "He is quite sure that the endgame wasn't simply kidnapping him."

quite literally

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Yurka threw herself into the part – quite literally.
  • Lives may, quite literally, be at stake."
  • Parapoetic ventures into sign systems that are – quite literally – unheard of."

became quite popular

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Within a few weeks, sales grew brisk and the book became quite popular.
  • The Junior/F12 series became quite popular, and many cars were produced.
  • These became quite popular both for their entertainment value and for use in education.

usually quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The president's entrances are usually quite spectacular.
  • The mutiraja used all over Nusa Tenggara Timur are usually quite small.
  • The winters are usually quite warm and the temperature rarely goes below zero.

quite short

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He was quite short and was bullied for his small size.
  • When mounted, he looked tall, but on his feet he was quite short.
  • The tail is quite short, amounting to less than 25% of the total length.

t quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Mirch" is a sexy idea that doesn’t quite come to fruition, she wrote.
  • Currinn gave a mixed review of the music video, stating that it "doesn’t quite meet [his] expectations".
  • It’s not like they are marksmen who can’t quite hit the center of the target; they’re holding the gun backwards."

t quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Mirch" is a sexy idea that doesn’t quite come to fruition, she wrote.
  • Currinn gave a mixed review of the music video, stating that it "doesn’t quite meet [his] expectations".
  • It’s not like they are marksmen who can’t quite hit the center of the target; they’re holding the gun backwards."

generally quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The critical reception of the book was generally quite positive.
  • These materials are generally quite brittle and prone to fracture.
  • It is generally quite fertile and yields a plentiful variety of products.

quite frequently

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Salt was abundant in Aksum and was traded quite frequently.
  • At that time I saw him and conversed with him quite frequently.
  • Aristotle is also quite frequently quoted in Alexander's works.

quite closely

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The ships fulfilled the design requirement quite closely.
  • With the proper seasonings, they can mimic various kinds of meat quite closely.
  • The video tells a basic version of the story behind "The Black Parade" quite closely.

quite limited

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In other respects, however, the tone generator is quite limited.
  • The first phase of Rangaku was quite limited and highly controlled.
  • In 1767 he took an MD degree, but his activity in medicine was quite limited.

quite unusual

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This was quite unusual for a doctoral dissertation.
  • The flowers produced by the plant are quite unusual.
  • This feature is quite unusual in the family Tachinidae.

quite quickly

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They have short legs, but can move quite quickly.
  • Armadillos have short legs, but can move quite quickly.
  • It was intended as an ultralight that could be quite quickly (300 hours) assembled by inexperienced constructors.

making them quite

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • However, they have their feet placed far back on the body, making them quite ungainly on land.
  • Oftentimes, ice caps gradually merge into ice sheets; making them quite hard to track and document.

quite differently

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The pollutants can be measured quite differently.
  • Solution-focused therapists see the therapeutic change process quite differently.
  • Numerals function quite differently in Kuikuro than the typical Indo-European system.

quite a long

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Life was like this for quite a long time.
  • "It took quite a long time", Iommi said.
  • Such materials take quite a long time to heat up, therefore the room takes a long time to warm up.

quite strong

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The weather is quite strong with very cold winters and very hot summers.
  • The evidence raises suspicion; in some instances quite strong suspicion.
  • Hikaru's feelings for her are quite strong but he only realizes it later.

quite easy

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But school isn't that difficult, it's quite easy."
  • Identification of the Stagemaster guitars is quite easy.
  • But it is quite easy to learn and enjoyable to play, and it is worth acquiring.
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