Shininess Shinleaf

Shining

Meanings and phrases

shining

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. marked by exceptional merit
  2. made smooth and bright by or as if by rubbing; reflecting a sheen or glow; bright; burnished; lustrous; shiny
  3. reflecting light; glistening; glossy; lustrous; sheeny; shiny

shining

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the work of making something smooth and shiny by rubbing or waxing it; polishing

Shining Path

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a terrorist group formed in Peru in the late 1960s as a splinter group from the communist party of Peru; is among the most ruthless guerilla organizations in the world; seeks to destroy Peruvian institutions and replace them with a Maoist peasant regime; is involved in the cocaine trade; Sendero Luminoso; SL

shining clubmoss

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a variety of club moss; Lycopodium lucidulum

shining sumac

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. common nonpoisonous shrub of eastern North America with compound leaves and green paniculate flowers followed by red berries; dwarf sumac; mountain sumac; black sumac; Rhus copallina

shining willow

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. common North American shrub with shiny lanceolate leaves; Salix lucida

shining dark

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The hindwings are pale grayish brown, shining dark purplish, with small pale dots apically.
  • The forewings have a brown ground color, shining dark purplish, scattered with conspicuous white spots throughout, regularly arranged along margins as well as between veins.

shining white

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The shining white quartz of the Pfahl consists of up to 98% silicic acid; any yellowish to reddish or grey coloration is caused by iron compounds and impurities ("Pfahlschiefer").
  • The new Baroque churches of the Counter-Reformation were usually shining white inside and filled with statues, frescoes, marble, gold and colorful paintings, to appeal to the public.
  • For example, because the cognates suggest matt white rather than shining white, and because in medieval Scandinavian texts whiteness is associated with beauty, Alaric Hall has suggested that elves may have been called "the white people" because whiteness was associated with (specifically feminine) beauty.
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