Sicily Sick-abed

Sick

Meanings and phrases

sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; ill
  2. feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit; nauseated; nauseous; queasy; sickish
  3. affected with madness or insanity; brainsick; crazy; demented; disturbed; mad; unbalanced; unhinged
  4. having a strong distaste from surfeit; disgusted; fed up; sick of; tired of
  5. shockingly repellent; inspiring horror; ghastly; grim; grisly; gruesome; macabre
  6. (of light) lacking in intensity or brightness; dim or feeble; pale; pallid; wan
  7. deeply affected by a strong feeling

sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. people who are sick

sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; vomit; vomit up; purge; cast; cat; be sick; disgorge; regorge; retch; puke; barf; spew; spue; chuck; upchuck; honk; regurgitate; throw up

air sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. experiencing motion sickness; airsick; carsick; seasick
n.
  1. a Catholic sacrament; a priest anoints a dying person with oil and prays for salvation; extreme unction; last rites

be sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; vomit; vomit up; purge; cast; sick; cat; disgorge; regorge; retch; puke; barf; spew; spue; chuck; upchuck; honk; regurgitate; throw up

sick bag

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a bag provided on an airplane for passengers who are suffering from airsickness and need to vomit; sickbag

sick benefit

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. money paid (by the government) to someone who is too ill to work; sickness benefit

sick berth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (nautical) a room for the treatment of the sick or injured (as on a ship); sickbay

sick call

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the daily military formation at which individuals report to the medical officer as sick; sick parade

sick headache

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a severe recurring vascular headache; occurs more frequently in women than men; migraine; megrim; hemicrania
  2. a headache accompanied by nausea

sick joke

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a joke in bad taste

sick leave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a leave of absence from work because of illness
E.g.
  • In England on sick leave in 1834, he was made an LL.D.
  • Izard himself asked for sick leave and tendered his resignation, which was refused.
  • He also participated in the Kentucky Campaign that autumn, and then took a brief sick leave.

sick list

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a list of those who are ill (e.g. on a warship or in a regiment etc)

sick of

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. having a strong distaste from surfeit; disgusted; fed up; sick; tired of

sick parade

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the daily military formation at which individuals report to the medical officer as sick; sick call

sick pay

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. wages paid to an employee who is on sick leave

sick person

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a person suffering from an illness; diseased person; sufferer

sick days

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This misuse is from late arrivals, leaving early, long lunch breaks, inappropriate sick days etc.
  • It also has been found to decrease sick days, raise physical activity levels, and enhance cognitive functioning.
  • Employers must now keep a payroll and provide workers with written notifications regarding sick days, vacation days, and work schedules.

became sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Later in the summer he became sick with typhus.
  • During the operation, Yeo was among the many British who became sick.
  • The filly became sick soon after the race and died from an intestinal tumour.

paid sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The law requires that companies with 11 or more employees give workers up to 40 hours of paid sick time a year, while smaller companies may offer it unpaid.
  • Liberationists were successful in their demands concerning abortion in Denmark, as the law which previously gave limited access, changed in 1973 granting free service on demand with paid sick leave.
  • Additionally, Franklin Area School District teachers receive a defined benefit pension, health insurance, professional development reimbursement, paid personal days, 15 paid sick days and many other benefits.

very sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Father Halley is very sick with multiple sclerosis.
  • I've been very sick for months without any medicine...
  • She becomes very sick and stays in bed for several months.

sick and wounded

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The sick and wounded reached 40,000 to 50,000.
  • to sick and wounded warriors in time of war .
  • The logo design was taken from certificates used in World War I for sick and wounded veterans.

sick people

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Most sick people turn to local healers, and used folk remedies.
  • Miracles were reported on his grave : severely sick people were cured.
  • These are sick people."

fell sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • On 23 August 634, Abu Bakr fell sick and did not recover.
  • On one occasion, when he fell sick at work, his wife came to visit him.
  • In the end of 1621, 70 year old Job fell sick and died on 29 December 1621.

sick children

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • hospitals for sick children.
  • For example, he visited sick children at the Children's Hospital of New Orleans.
  • In Brittany she is widely revered as a patron saint of sick children and those whose birth is overdue.

got sick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But I never got sick, because I was so tense during the filming."
  • Jones noted: I started making a second solo record, then got sick of it.
  • Renaldo reports that the soldiers got sick and began to execute everyone.

paid sick days

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Additionally, Franklin Area School District teachers receive a defined benefit pension, health insurance, professional development reimbursement, paid personal days, 15 paid sick days and many other benefits.
  • Additionally, the teachers receive a defined benefit pension, health insurance, life insurance, paid bereavement days off, professional development reimbursement, 3 paid personal days, 10 paid sick days, and other benefits.
  • In addition to a defined benefit pension, health insurance, life insurance, vision insurance, dental insurance, professional development reimbursement, 10 paid sick days which accumulate, 2 paid personal days, 1 paid emergency leave day and a variety of other benefits.

sick man

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • “I’m a sick man and my career has suffered.
  • He wrote, "It is better to cure a sick man than to kill him."
  • Longford had successfully argued that to keep a sick man in jail was an "indefensible cruelty".
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