Skimpy Skin-deep

Skin

Meanings and phrases

skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch; tegument; cutis
  2. body covering of a living animal; hide; pelt
  3. an outer surface (usually thin)
  4. a person's skin regarded as their life
  5. the rind of a fruit or vegetable; peel
  6. a bag serving as a container for liquids; it is made from the hide of an animal

skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. remove the bark of a tree; bark
  2. climb awkwardly, as if by scrambling; clamber; scramble; shin; shinny; struggle; sputter
  3. bruise, cut, or injure the skin or the surface of; scrape
  4. strip the skin off; peel; pare

animal skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the outer covering of an animal
E.g.
  • The first stage in creating a codex is to prepare the animal skin.
  • It is made of hollow tree, wrapped on both sides with animal skin.
  • The animal skin was folded accordion style to form the distinct pages.

artificial skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a synthetic covering with two layers used experimentally to treat burn victims

banana skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the skin of a banana (especially when it is stripped off and discarded); banana peel

disease of the skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a disease affecting the skin; skin disease; skin disorder
n.
  1. a change in the electrical properties of the skin in response to stress or anxiety; can be measured either by recording the electrical resistance of the skin or by recording weak currents generated by the body; galvanic skin response; GSR; psychogalvanic response; electrodermal response; Fere phenomenon; Tarchanoff phenomenon
n.
  1. a change in the electrical properties of the skin in response to stress or anxiety; can be measured either by recording the electrical resistance of the skin or by recording weak currents generated by the body; GSR; psychogalvanic response; electrodermal response; electrical skin response; Fere phenomenon; Tarchanoff phenomenon

get under one 's skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. irritate; get

goose skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. reflex erection of hairs of the skin in response to cold or emotional stress or skin irritation; pilomotor reflex; gooseflesh; goose bump; goosebump; goose pimple; horripilation

potato skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. crisp fried potato peeling; potato peel; potato peelings

skin and bones

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a person who is unusually thin and scrawny; thin person; scrag

skin cancer

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a malignant neoplasm of the skin
E.g.
  • Some of these are associated with increased risk of skin cancer .
  • Ultraviolet radiation from sun exposure is the primary cause of skin cancer.
  • Bishop McCauley suffered from facial skin cancer for much of his adult life.

skin care

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. care for the skin; skincare
E.g.
  • Aveeno Aveeno is a brand of skin care and hair care products.
  • Keeping up with a skin care regimen so the skin is moisturized helps as well.
  • He has psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, and advises clients on skin care.

skin cell

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of the cells making up the skin

skin color

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the coloring of a person's face; complexion; skin colour
E.g.
  • As soon as she had passed, her skin color turned white.
  • It has no effect on skin color.
  • human height and skin color).

skin colour

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the coloring of a person's face; complexion; skin color
E.g.
  • The story about young girl "Pothum Ponnu" explores the social impacts of skin colour.
  • The variation for light skin colour was introduced to Europe by the neolithic farmers.
  • Today, by contrast, such canons prefer a 'healthier' skin colour, sportiness, gait and so on.

skin disease

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a disease affecting the skin; disease of the skin; skin disorder
E.g.
  • The main feature was chloracne, a serious skin disease.
  • Miriam was punished with a skin disease ("tzaraath") that turned her skin white.
  • In some of these countries, such as northern Papua New Guinea, it is the most common skin disease.

skin disorder

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a disease affecting the skin; skin disease; disease of the skin

skin diving

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. underwater swimming without any more breathing equipment than a snorkel; skin-dive

skin doctor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a doctor who specializes in the physiology and pathology of the skin; dermatologist

skin effect

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the tendency of high-frequency alternating current to distribute near the surface of a conductor

skin eruption

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. eruption on the skin occurring as a symptom of a disease; exanthem; exanthema

skin flick

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a pornographic movie

skin graft

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a piece of skin taken from a donor area and surgically grafted at the site of an injury or burn

skin over

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. grow new skin over an injury

skin patch

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a medicated adhesive pad placed on the skin for absorption of a time released dose of medication into the bloodstream; transdermal patch
n.
  1. the faculty of perceiving (via the skin) pressure or heat or pain; tactual sensation; tactility; touch perception

skin pop

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. inject (drugs) into the skin

skin rash

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any red eruption of the skin; rash; roseola; efflorescence

skin sensation

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a sensation localized on the skin; cutaneous sensation; haptic sensation

skin senses

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the faculty by which external objects or forces are perceived through contact with the body (especially the hands); touch; sense of touch; touch modality; cutaneous senses

skin test

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any test to determine immunity or sensitivity to a disease by introducing small amounts on or into the skin

skin tumor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a neoplasm originating in the epidermis; acanthoma

thick skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. skin that is very thick (as an elephant or rhinoceros)
n.
  1. a skin test to determine past or present infection with the tuberculosis bacterium; based on hypersensitivity of the skin to tuberculin; tuberculin test

water skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a container of skin for holding water; waterskin

human skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There are also three books bound in human skin.
  • T-2 can be absorbed through human skin.
  • This parchment, however, is actually one of the Marks of Kri - human skin.

through the skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They supplement this with gas exchange through the skin.
  • It is unclear if antimony can enter the body through the skin.
  • It is widely used in hospitals to deliver drugs through the skin.

skin diseases

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He worked in the department of skin diseases and venereal diseases.
  • Anthony is appealed to against infectious diseases, particularly skin diseases.
  • It is seen in skin diseases with epidermal hyperplasia and orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis.

dark skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Naathi people have dark skin and golden eyes.
  • Black foals have dark skin and eyes at birth.
  • A horse with dark skin and dark eyes under a white hair coat is gray.

skin lesions

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Xanthomas are one of types of skin lesions that may occur in this situation.
  • A family with Kyrle disease were examined which their skin lesions were benign.
  • The diagnosis is by visual examination of skin lesions and sun exposure history.

skin irritation

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Sun exposure while using this preparation can cause skin irritation.
  • Unlike other drugs, it does not cause skin irritation or phototoxicity.
  • Contact with the hairy bodies of these caterpillars can cause skin irritation.

skin tone

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They objected particularly to the black outlines and yellowish skin tone present in the painting.
  • In addition to the eight ColorChart samples, two skin tone samples are defined (TCS09 and TCS10).
  • Due to the lack of exposure to sunlight, she also had a very light skin tone and suffered from jaundice.

skin condition

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • After suffering from a poor skin condition, he died in prison in 1632.
  • He has psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, and advises clients on skin care.
  • His caucasian coloration allows him to occasionally pass as a human with a "skin condition".

pale skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The people of Princemarch are typically dark haired with pale skin.
  • The ears tilt forward, and the face has a triangular shape and pale skin.
  • Agathe Cléry is a marketing manager for a line of cosmetics for people with pale skin.

skin cells

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "B.hostilis" feeds on dead skin cells and can cause severe damage to gills.
  • These proteins form the glue that keeps skin cells attached and the skin intact.
  • It is a keratolytic agent, which reduces the growth rate of skin cells and softens the skin's keratin.

skin around

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The skin around the eyes was white and the beak was pale flesh colored.
  • The skin around the mouth, anus, and inside of the ear is considerably thinner.
  • The base of the shell has a bright yellow or orange skin around the deep umbilicus.

white skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Xavier had white skin, white hair, and unique scarlet red eyes.
  • Borg have flat, white skin, giving them an almost zombie-like appearance.
  • He is described as having "white skin, blue eyes and attractive face; good looking, although somewhat sturdy and stout.

skin conditions

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Plottel’s wife Rachel was a doctor specialising in skin conditions.
  • It is used topically (in a 0.05% cream provided as Halog) in the treatment of certain skin conditions.
  • Topical use is also one of the treatment options for some skin conditions including acne and cellulitis.

skin tones

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • the complexities of skin tones.
  • Others have noted that there are few black plus-size models with darker skin tones.
  • The foliage in the background provides a dark background against which the swimmers' skin tones contrast.

skin contact

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In case of skin contact, wash with soap and water.
  • Hence, skin contact with T-2 should be limited.
  • Prolonged skin contact with antimony dust may cause dermatitis.

outer skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The peridium (outer skin) is 250–350 μm thick and comprises two distinct layers of tissue.
  • The peridium (outer skin) is 200–300 μm thick and comprises two distinct layers of tissue.
  • The peridium (outer skin) is 200–250 μm thick and comprises two distinct layers of tissue.

light skin

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The variation for light skin colour was introduced to Europe by the neolithic farmers.
  • It is especially common in people with light skin types who live in sunny climates ("e.g.
  • Due to the lack of exposure to sunlight, she also had a very light skin tone and suffered from jaundice.
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