Snugness So-and-so

So

Meanings and phrases

so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to a very great extent or degree
  2. in a manner that facilitates
  3. in such a condition or manner, especially as expressed or implied
  4. to a certain unspecified extent or degree
  5. in the same way; also
  6. in the way indicated; (`thusly' is a nonstandard variant); thus; thusly
  7. (usually followed by `that') to an extent or degree as expressed
  8. subsequently or soon afterward (often used as sentence connectors); then; and so; and then
  9. in truth (often tends to intensify); indeed
  10. (used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result; therefore; hence; thence; thus

so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the syllable naming the fifth (dominant) note of any musical scale in solmization; sol; soh

and so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. subsequently or soon afterward (often used as sentence connectors); then; so; and then

and so forth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. continuing in the same way; and so on; etcetera; etc.

and so on

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. continuing in the same way; and so forth; etcetera; etc.

even so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession); however; nevertheless; withal; still; yet; all the same; nonetheless; notwithstanding
E.g.
  • As the Will of God is in Heaven, even so let it be."
  • It turns out the clock's ticking is incredibly loud, even so it can be heard upstairs.
  • The religious text: "For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive."

ever so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. (intensifier for adjectives) very; ever
adv.
  1. occasionally; every now and then

in so far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. to the degree or extent that; insofar; so far; to that extent; to that degree

just so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. in a careful manner
E.g.
  • It just so happens that ours is out in the public.
  • I'm just so brokenhearted about all those people."
  • It was just so magical I was like ‘that’s enough.

or so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. (of quantities) imprecise but fairly close to correct; approximately; about; close to; just about; some; roughly; more or less; around

so far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. used in negative statement to describe a situation that has existed up to this point or up to the present time; thus far; up to now; hitherto; heretofore; as yet; yet; til now; until now
  2. to the degree or extent that; insofar; in so far; to that extent; to that degree
  3. used after a superlative; yet
E.g.
  • The only such cube constructed so far is order 8.
  • The album has so far been well received by critics.
  • Only four teams have won the championship so far.

so long

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a farewell remark; adieu; adios; arrivederci; auf wiedersehen; au revoir; bye; bye-bye; cheerio; good-by; goodby; good-bye; goodbye; good day; sayonara
E.g.
  • Liu Dong states, "You have been away for so long".
  • It is little wonder that compromise takes so long.
  • Strange that this album has been obscure for so long.

so to speak

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. as if it were really so; as it were
  2. in a manner of speaking; as we say
E.g.
  • It keeps them ‘in the market’ of ideas, so to speak.
  • Justification is, so to speak, "turtles all the way down."
  • They have had the art political power in Norway so to speak.

so much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I don't care so much what the papers say about me.
  • His showmanship adds so much flair to a live gig."
  • there was so much to enjoy in "The Last Weekend".

doing so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They separated from the Creek Nation by doing so.
  • Not doing so can reinforce feelings of isolation.
  • In doing so, she hopes to regain their reverence.

so many

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There are so many institutions under this diocese.
  • There are so many things that I can not understand.
  • But it can be so many things to different people.

did so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • And it did so because it was a true collaboration.
  • She did so in the hope of changing his behaviour.
  • He did so, replacing it with a sparkling "Allegro".

not so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • So are "F" and "Z", but these two are not so rare.
  • Two traits are not so obviously linked to ontogeny.
  • In China, however, credit cards are not so popular.

done so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But what he has done so far has been very positive.
  • One of the youngest riders to have ever done so.
  • The guards replied that they had not done so.

so named

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The system is so named due to its use in astronomy.
  • This was so named for part of a vessel 6 or 700 tons.
  • Big Island was so named on account of its size.

so well

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "That's the reason Applied Biosystems did so well."
  • He would not fare so well later on in the war.
  • Their slightly crazy voices work so well on the chorus.

more so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This holds even more so with stocks, oil and gold.
  • But it was even more so for Muslims."
  • Antenna: Brown except segment 1 yellowish, more so on underside.

so called

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Chitanbeh is famous for its Rice so called Champa.
  • 13 of the districts are so called Sámi districts.

became so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She stated the abuse became so severe that she contemplated suicide.
  • It became so popular that it was moved to the big stage in January 2009.
  • Captain Georges Lecointe and Gerlache became so ill they wrote their wills.

does so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • As the slug does so, it absorbs the alga's poison.
  • In short, why does so much planned development fail?
  • Whoever does so, their souls will reach heaven.

so popular

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In China, however, credit cards are not so popular.
  • He thanked Leon Lai for making his songs so popular.
  • But it was exactly Bernes's performance that made it so popular.

so did

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The hotel changed its policy and so did the Order.
  • As the press grew, so did the size of the volumes.
  • Geumwa's seven sons resented Jumong, and so did he.

much so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • So much so they added fireworks in 2015-16 celebration.
  • So much so that, in early 1960, Harlan quit.
  • He was uncompromising on his principles, perhaps too much so.

so when

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This slug can swim, and will do so when disturbed.
  • The profane are unable to accumulate good deeds, so when they die it is truly death.
  • The babies receive no parental care, so when they emerge, they start to hunt for food.
E.g.
  • It was so successful, paint became a bottleneck.
  • His studio albums released after 1992 were not so successful.
  • Silk production was not so successful.

so forth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The versions are 2, 2.7, 2.71, 2.718, and so forth.
  • So it means "and so forth" or "and other things".
  • The next is labeled as β (beta), and so forth.

not so much

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "[T]he debate was not so much about Mary as about Jesus.
  • Some people love him, others not so much.
  • Mrs. Clinton has a lot of experience; Ms. Palin, not so much.

so great

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The merchant is blessed for having so great a treasure.
  • She is so professional and so great.
  • His interest was so great that he wanted to be a wildlife presenter.

so as not

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Lychas persuades him to stay until nightfall, so as not to invite gossip.
  • Yet it was carefully crafted so as not to change the underlying benchmark.
  • We need to mature as a society so as not to repeat those historical errors."
E.g.
  • Some artists in Sydney were not so impressed.
  • This so impressed Pratt that he hired 26-year-old Rogers immediately.
  • Kiel was so impressed, they offered him a contract for the following season.

so much so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ellie is in love with Russ, so much so she proposes marriage to him.
  • He was renowned for his slide tackling ability, so much so this became his trademark ability.
  • The ship's bow section was badly damaged, so much so that her propeller was raised out of the water.

so close

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Fifty-one to fifty, we were so close.
  • Tony and I talked about it, and we came so close to messing it up.
  • Why see our neighbors as enemies when we are so close to each other?"

become so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He had no idea it would become so widely known.
  • It has become so many other things.
  • It is a Grade II listed structure, having become so on 5 February 1970.

so often

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was delayed so often it was nicknamed "Apocalypse When?"
  • Learning from others’ mistakes because they are so often our own.
  • It seems that there was no other painter for whom Bialik sat so often.
E.g.
  • The church was so named because of its proximity to Oxford Castle.
  • It was so named because it was originally thought to control abscission.
  • McDeek) Avenue in Terrace is so named because of Wright's totemic affiliation.)

so doing

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In so doing, Wallenda set his sixth world record.
  • In so doing they modify, maintain and create habitats."
  • In so doing, the MPG lost its slim majority of one seat.
E.g.
  • It has remained so, subject to one change that was made in 1986.
  • The rivalry began highly competitive and remained so for many years.
  • By 1934 these had changed to LENR, and remained so until at least 1939.

so large

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its ears are so large that they hang over its face.
  • Attendance was so large, the party spilled out into the street.
  • Livy wrote: ‘hardly ever before had they raised so large a force’.

so because

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • And it did so because it was a true collaboration.
  • He was named so because Upari - Upwards and Chara - Going i.e.
  • Pillow lace, called so because of the pillow used to produce handmade bobbin lace.

so hard

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • People work so hard to pass an examination!
  • I felt sorry for my crew because they had worked so hard!"
  • I was deeply saddened at so hard a fate."

went so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He even went so far as "[...defending] Italian policy."
  • He then went so Royal Ascot for the Golden Jubilee Stakes again.
  • Hut even went so far as to predict a 1528 coming of the kingdom of God.

so good

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Its title: "So far so good" "(Zatim Dobry)".
  • "Do you see now why it feels so good to be a critical mind?"
  • This sawtooth wave is so good that no linearity control is needed.

not do so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • As IcyFive was not viewing the stream, he did not do so.
  • But the ministry of health did not do so.
  • The various factors that affect zap time do not do so in the same way.

so strong

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But when that incident happened, it fired up so strong, it had to be over.
  • The collision was so strong that "Marcellus" had her bow practically cut off.
  • Stokes' interest in the Prize was not so strong as to prompt her to enter again.

going so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Since joining Dan, Iceman has matured considerably, going so far as to forgive Falcon.
  • As soon as stuff stopped going so perfectly, I was like, 'I know what to do with this energy.
  • The well-known artist has fallen into oblivion, things are not going so well as in the old days.

so high

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • However, Einfeld denied he was aware his points were so high.
  • The pup's diet is so high in calories, it builds up a fat store.
  • The production is so high that the UK is an exporter of cannabis.

so no

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "F" was never finished, and so no music was ever added.
  • They are more like kites than airplanes, so no harm done.
  • A new annual list is used every year, so no names are retired.

so bad

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It really got so bad that we didn't do anything.
  • The bias against women was so bad at that time.
  • Well, he said, the food got so bad, he said.

went so far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He even went so far as "[...defending] Italian policy."
  • Hut even went so far as to predict a 1528 coming of the kingdom of God.
  • He went so far to state Roosevelt "never met an animal he didn't kill."

less so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The climate is more oceanic in the west, and less so in the east.
  • The females in a group tend to be closely related and males less so.
  • Its ears are somewhat rounded, but less so than the African wild dog.

going so far

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Since joining Dan, Iceman has matured considerably, going so far as to forgive Falcon.
  • The translator becomes obsessed with the imagery, going so far as to see himself depicted within the ancient work.
  • Bill has gone more into darkness, going so far as to control the Authority and injure Jessica and put her in a cage.

so badly

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Otherwise, why would we treat them so badly?"
  • But I wanted it so badly and I achieved it!"
  • Scully had been so badly wounded that he was unable to move.

so all

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • No qualifying round was needed, so all entrants were finalists.
  • Every character is featured equally, so all preferences are covered.
  • It was published in 2018, so all of its implications are yet to be seen.

so little

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It decided so little, and it was such an important case.
  • Having read so little he is quite at the mercy of his one book!"
  • I never worked so little on something and I was never congratulated so much."
E.g.
  • Fishing was the main activity but now is not so important.
  • Now, we understand why colonies are so important to Poland".
  • It doesn't cost anything to do and I think it is so important."

so only

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 6), so only knowledge of Spanish is virtually universal.
  • If any one was to be a true clue, any one could be so only leading nowhere."
  • At a young age, they can also gallop but do so only in emergency situations.

so that all

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The room is arranged so that all the women are sitting in a circle.
  • One Joker lies turned up cross under the closed deck so that all players can see it.
  • A related function makes an image of an object rotate, so that all sides can be examined.
E.g.
  • The rules are designed so that rarer events require larger drinks.
  • Sin Wenz was designed so that every dialect had its own form of the alphabet.
  • The Deseret alphabet was purposely designed so as to not have ascenders and descenders.

so quickly

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But Seketoa jumped up so quickly that it missed him.
  • No one could be filled with it so quickly!"
  • The Age of Man, so quickly heralded, is already under siege.

up so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • But Seketoa jumped up so quickly that it missed him.
  • Miller, however, would not give up so easily.
  • But when that incident happened, it fired up so strong, it had to be over.

so does

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Soni first goes into labour, then so does Rano.
  • For instance, if "g" generates "G", then so does "h".
  • As language differs, so does the developmental process.

so that when

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In 1948, the rules were changed so that when this occurs the match is declared a draw.
  • The bronze tiles are tuned so that when danced upon it is possible to play "Hot Codlins".
  • Mercury included the cohesive principle, so that when it left in smoke the wood fell apart.

so that each

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Population soared so that each year more than 1,000 new students entered the schools.
  • The upper ends are cut open at different length so that each tube has different notes.
  • Human units persist between missions, so that each loss is a loss for the rest of the game.

so too

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Fermi and Anderson did so too a few weeks later.
  • JoMo thinks so too, but he hopes all of them are wrong.
  • Since has winding number , so too does .

even more so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This holds even more so with stocks, oil and gold.
  • But it was even more so for Muslims."
  • Although Magruder had been conservative about his attack, Sumner was even more so.
E.g.
  • Ward becomes the landlord when there are so many people.
  • Just like so many people have spent the night awaiting fear.
  • I am sure if they had glass walls not so many people would be eating flesh.

so small

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • For so small a shell it seems remarkably solid and strong.
  • Since the capsules are so small, the resulting print is very accurate.
  • Dearman was so small beside Mynn that they were dubbed "David and Goliath".
E.g.
  • Mont-Royal), so called because it leads to the foot of Mount Royal.
  • It is so called because the dancers wear face masks which look like .
  • The Cathedral Quarter is so called because St Anne's Cathedral lies at its heart.

so severe

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The blow was so severe that her bow was almost wrenched off.
  • This ailment was so severe that it was thought to be leprosy.
  • However, when the slew rate of the current is not so severe (e.g.

so that no

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This required adding a third tank so that no tank would go below half full.
  • He attempted to kill Julia, or to drive her mad so that no one would believe her accusations.
  • A schedule is needed so that no processor has to send or receive two messages in the same step.
E.g.
  • It's so different from a lot of his other stuff.
  • She suggests that perhaps human and Cylon are not so different after all.
  • But are they so different?"

so low

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He never again allowed his cash position to fall so low.
  • Grose wrote: "if 900 or 1100 died, why were the numbers of injured so low?
  • The raiders flew so low over the North Sea that they made a propeller wash.

so few

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • and "Why are there so few women in tech?
  • It is now considered collectable because so few were pressed.
  • Since there is so few left in the breed it is not used commercially.

proved so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She expresses surprise that her life has proved so mundane after all.
  • The work proved so popular that there were 35 editions produced that year.
  • The show proved so popular that Northlanders wanted to encourage the young dancers.

so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • George's reply was "well he only has one leg – so he must be an athlete."
  • God buried the dead – for says, "And He buried him in the valley" – so should we also bury the dead.
  • Peter is disappointed since Francis did not care about him – so he gives up drinking and does crack instead.

so without

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They did so without bassist Dougie Thomson.
  • Finally, Arcita gains the victory, doing so without killing Palemone.
  • On being requested to make a drawing of it, he did so without hesitation."

time so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The last time so many patches had survived all year was 1994.
  • There was no local kiln at the time so bricks had to be shipped in.
  • There was no UKIP candidate this time so the swing from UKIP to Labour was 26.5%.
E.g.
  • Ilyoung grows so powerful that only So-hwi can beat him.
  • And the sounds are so powerful.
  • The blast was so powerful that its force left one of the victims decapitated.

years or so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • For three years or so they lived in peace on their new planet.
  • Considine worked in Boston for two years or so before moving to California.
  • I would not be surprised if Sid will practice Tuvan throat singing in five years or so.

changed so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Skateboarding’s changed so much now.
  • I changed so much over the show and Guy definitely helped with that."
  • In 1948, the rules were changed so that when this occurs the match is declared a draw.

so fast

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He recalled of the limited time frame, "it went by so fast.
  • It came so fast that she wasn't sure that she had done her best job.
  • It all happened so fast that no one on land fully understood what had happened.

so closely

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The flyby was the first time an unmanned spacecraft had imaged the asteroid so closely.
  • During copulation both slugs cling together so closely that no everted genitalia are visible.
  • why are the Higgs doublets so light) and doublet–triplet splitting are so closely intertwined.

so people

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It needed more information so people would know exactly what took place.
  • There was no warning of the first wave so people had no idea it was coming.
  • I thought I would go back so people could see I was older now and it worked."

so easily

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A victory against the city wasn't so easily achieved.
  • Miller, however, would not give up so easily.
  • He just covers the ground so easily."

so that only

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Parental chloroplasts can be sorted so that only one type is present in each offspring.
  • Entrance was subject to a fee, so that only wealthy zanzibaris could use them regularly.
  • Both constraints fix the overall scale of the indices so that only their [[ratios]] can vary.

so most

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The entire set of computable numbers is countable, so most reals are not computable.
  • Parking is problematic, so most people ride their bikes and use the free valet parking.
  • There are relatively few adverbial roots, so most words ending in "-e" are derived: "bele" (beautifully).

so far only

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is the first and so far only time that Namibia won the pageant.
  • It was the first, and so far only, occasion in which Cyprus placed last.
  • That title was the university's first and so far only national team title.

so much more

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • She brought in the hat rule and she organised so much more.
  • I am so much more than a belly dancer.
  • It could have been so much more."

made so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • All of the figures were made so acutely and delicately.
  • We would have made so much money together ten years ago.

so many years

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • All of that after so many years, can you believe that?
  • He added that "perhaps I was burned out after so many years.
  • You only have so many years to live, and you want to see a different way."
E.g.
  • It became so popular that it was moved to the big stage in January 2009.
  • The number became so popular that it would serve as the title to a later Temple film of the same name.
  • Achi's practice became so popular that she has been included in other lineages, such as the Karma Kagyu.

work so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Their slightly crazy voices work so well on the chorus.
  • There is a problem at work so the daughters go solve it.
  • People work so hard to pass an examination!

so he decided

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Jeon was aggrieved and upset, so he decided to hunt down the true culprit.
  • Zmazek didn't want to seek another singer, so he decided to sing by himself.
  • Ollie didn't want to send Jake, an original member, so he decided to send himself to Limbo.

so common

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The "-fels" ending was so common, "e.g."
  • Olives were so common that they were used as a measure ("zayit").
  • Hinterland displays a not so common example of a bilingual production.

so each

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It later become the tradition for pop artistes doing so each year.
  • They decide to create a "no-no list" so each one can't do certain things.
  • Deltas are stored in a delta table, so each SCCS file has its own record of changes.
E.g.
  • They emphasize the importance of small groups so that people can connect.
  • The idea of this structure is to minimize judgement so that people can learn.
  • She said it was named so that people might think "That's one of her secrets".

so soon

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The war ended so soon that the single was never released.
  • Could be very soon or not so soon at all!"
  • I didn’t know my dream would come true so soon in my career but I feel blessed.

enough so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Her mom is shocked, enough so she needs a Valium.
  • ... A solid game, but not enough so to overshadow its predecessor."
  • Later, Rosa reveals she got evidence enough so Boyle can get the credit.
E.g.
  • The town does not have any Schedule Tribe population so far.

year or so

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • That happened six times, I think, altogether – seven reschedules in a year or so ...
  • His parents divorced when he was aged five, with his mother remarrying a year or so later.
  • Allan Ross had left a year or so earlier, but Hare declined his entreaties to leave with him.

so happy

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • When I met her I embraced her, I was so happy to meet her."
  • and Michael Dougherty who stated: "I left so happy and inspired.
  • Dark cannot survive in such close contact with someone so happy.

so poor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His conditioning had become so poor that he could barely trot around the bases.
  • The standard was so poor, that Sky Sports stopped broadcasting it halfway through.

so even

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The rules are simple, so even young children can play.
  • It does so even at cytotoxic levels.
  • They decided to do so even though they knew that to appeal was forbidden.
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