Virulently Viruses

Virus

Meanings and phrases

virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
  2. a harmful or corrupting agency
  3. a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer; computer virus

Coxsackie virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. enterovirus causing a disease resembling poliomyelitis but without paralysis; coxsackievirus

Ebola virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a filovirus that causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever; carried by animals; can be used as a bioweapon

Epstein-Barr virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis; associated with specific cancers in Africa and China; EBV

Junin virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the RNA virus that causes Argentine hemorrhagic fever; carried by rats and mice

Lassa virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the RNA virus that causes Lassa fever

Machupo virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the RNA virus that causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever; carried by rats and mice

Marburg virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a filovirus that causes Marburg disease; carried by animals; can be used as a bioweapon

West Nile encephalitis virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the flavivirus that causes West Nile encephalitis; West Nile virus

West Nile virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the flavivirus that causes West Nile encephalitis; West Nile encephalitis virus

animal virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an animal pathogen that is a virus

computer virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer; virus
E.g.
  • Three months later, their demos were wiped by a computer virus.
  • Dr. Wells discovers that Jaime is suffering from a computer virus which has infiltrated her bionic systems.
  • Shane - His curse was a computer virus that affected him in the form of living mucus while he was home sick.

hepatitis A virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the virus causing hepatitis A

herpes simplex virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a herpes virus that affects the skin and nervous system; herpes simplex
n.
  1. a herpes virus that causes chickenpox and shingles; herpes varicella zoster

herpes virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of the animal viruses that cause painful blisters on the skin; herpes

herpes zoster virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a herpes virus that causes shingles; herpes zoster
n.
  1. the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); it replicates in and kills the helper T cells; HIV
E.g.
  • Two types of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infect humans: HIV-1 and HIV-2.
  • The center has been researching the human immunodeficiency virus since the 1970s.
  • The Company’s lead product candidate is KP-1461 for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.
n.
  1. any of a group of papovaviruses associated with genital or oral carcinomas or a group associated with benign genital tumors
n.
  1. the RNA virus that causes lymphocytic choriomeningitis; infects mice and monkeys and dogs and guinea pigs and human beings

myxoma virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a poxvirus closely related to smallpox virus; causes benign gelatinous tumors in humans

onion yellow-dwarf virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the virus that produces stunting and yellowing of the leaves of onion plants

parainfluenza virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a virus that causes upper respiratory infection (including the common cold and bronchiolitis); most often in children

plant virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a plant pathogen that is a virus consisting of a single strand of RNA

polyoma virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a virus the can initiate various kinds of tumors in mice; polyoma

potato yellow-dwarf virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the virus that produces stunting and yellowing of the leaves of potato plants

respiratory syncytial virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a paramyxovirus that forms syncytia in tissue culture and that is responsible for severe respiratory diseases such as bronchiolitis and bronchial pneumonia (especially in children)

slow virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a virus that remains dormant in the body for a long time before symptoms appear

smallpox virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the virus that causes smallpox in humans; can be used as a bioweapon; variola virus

tobacco mosaic virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the widely studied plant virus that causes tobacco mosaic; it was the first virus discovered (1892); TMV

tumor virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a cell-free filtrate held to be a virus responsible for a specific neoplasm
n.
  1. the member of the herpes virus family that is responsible for chickenpox

variola major virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a type of smallpox virus that has a fatality rate of up to 25 percent; variola major

variola minor virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a type of smallpox virus that has a fatality rate of about 1 percent; variola minor

variola virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the virus that causes smallpox in humans; can be used as a bioweapon; smallpox virus

virus infection

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. infection by a virus that is pathogenic to humans; viral infection
E.g.
  • It is used for treatment of hepatitis B and herpes simplex virus infection.
  • Patients must be tested for hepatitis B virus infection prior to prescription.
  • Their work led to the understanding that both proteins are necessary for influenza A and B virus infection and replication.

wound tumor virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a tumor virus transmitted by leafhoppers; WTV

mosaic virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The most understood helical virus is the tobacco mosaic virus.
  • Plants can be doubly infected with high plains virus and wheat streak mosaic virus.
  • She studied the nucleic acids in yeast, pancreases, tobacco mosaic virus and calf thymus.

influenza virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • On the 11-day voyage, the pandemic influenza virus struck and killed many on board.
  • His laboratory has studied influenza virus and paramyxoviruses, more specifically, how they replicate.
  • In 2012 he engineered new hypermutated strains of Newcastle Disease Virus, closely related to influenza virus.
E.g.
  • Two types of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infect humans: HIV-1 and HIV-2.
  • The center has been researching the human immunodeficiency virus since the 1970s.
  • In addition, bites are probably the main route of transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus.

simplex virus

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is used for treatment of hepatitis B and herpes simplex virus infection.
  • In the lab, it has been shown to effectively block HIV and herpes simplex virus.
  • BV is a risk factor for viral shedding and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

virus replication

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Replication follows the positive stranded RNA virus replication model.
  • For example, HIV reverse transcriptase is an enzyme for AIDS virus replication.
  • There is no final proof of PVE being caused directly by vaccine virus replication in neural tissues.

virus particles

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The larva liquefies and releases millions of virus particles to spread and infect other moth larvae.
  • In the case of the T4 phage, the construction of new virus particles involves the assistance of helper proteins.
  • An altogether different phage type, the filamentous phage, make the host cell continually secrete new virus particles.

virus disease

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first case of the Ebola virus disease in Mali was detected in October 2014.
  • On 25 March 2014, the World Health Organization said that Guinea's Ministry of Health had reported an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea.
  • Équateur province's Provincial Health Division reported 21 cases with symptoms consistent with Ebola virus disease, of whom 17 had died, on 3 May 2018.
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