Visigoth Visionary

Vision

Meanings and phrases

vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a vivid mental image
  2. the ability to see; the visual faculty; sight; visual sense; visual modality
  3. the perceptual experience of seeing; visual sensation
  4. the formation of a mental image of something that is not perceived as real and is not present to the senses; imagination; imaginativeness
  5. a religious or mystical experience of a supernatural appearance

achromatic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision using the rods

binocular vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision involving the use of both eyes
E.g.
  • It included one of the first studies of binocular vision.
  • It was there that he started his binocular vision experiments as well.
  • Red foxes have binocular vision, but their sight reacts mainly to movement.

central vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision using the fovea and parafovea; the middle part of the visual field

chromatic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal ability to see colors; color vision; trichromacy

color vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal ability to see colors; chromatic vision; trichromacy
E.g.
  • Typically, this test is the "color vision light gun test".
  • He developed the theory of color vision.
  • These bees also have trichromatic color vision and are important pollinators in agriculture.

color vision deficiency

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. genetic inability to distinguish differences in hue; color blindness; colour blindness; colour vision deficiency
n.
  1. genetic inability to distinguish differences in hue; color blindness; colour blindness; color vision deficiency

daylight vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. normal vision in daylight; vision with sufficient illumination that the cones are active and hue is perceived; photopic vision

distance vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision for objects that a 20 feet or more from the viewer

double vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. visual impairment in which an object is seen as two objects; diplopia
E.g.
  • From there, I had double vision in one eye for the rest of the fight.
  • When asked, Earnhardt complained of double vision which made it difficult to pit.
  • It is associated with headaches, double vision, difficulties seeing, and a swollen optic disc.

field of vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. all of the points of the physical environment that can be perceived by a stable eye at a given moment; visual field; field of regard
E.g.
  • The animal's field of vision is compromised by the location and limited mobility of the eyes.
  • Symptoms include general muscle weakness, hearing damage, reduced field of vision, and ataxia.
  • It features Black Spelunker as the new protagonist along with a much narrower field of vision.

foveal vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision with the fovea

line of vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an imaginary straight line along which an observer looks; line of sight

monochromatic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. complete color blindness; colors can be differentiated only on the basis of brightness; monochromacy; monochromatism; monochromia; monochromasy

monocular vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision with only one eye

near vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision for objects 2 feet or closer to the viewer

night vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the ability to see in reduced illumination (as in moonlight); night-sight; scotopic vision; twilight vision
E.g.
  • He also has retractable claws and night vision.
  • Its night vision and sense of smell are well developed.
  • The group finds a hidden door using the night vision on Ángela's camera.

peripheral vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. vision at the edges of the visual field using only the periphery of the retina
E.g.
  • However, most of that arc is peripheral vision.
  • Most speed reading courses claim that the peripheral vision can be used to read text.
  • It will be somewhat below your eye level in your peripheral vision, perhaps 2-4 inches below eye level."

photopic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. normal vision in daylight; vision with sufficient illumination that the cones are active and hue is perceived; daylight vision

scotopic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the ability to see in reduced illumination (as in moonlight); night vision; night-sight; twilight vision

stereoscopic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. three-dimensional vision produced by the fusion of two slightly different views of a scene on each retina; stereoscopy

tunnel vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. visual impairment involving a loss of peripheral vision

twilight vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the ability to see in reduced illumination (as in moonlight); night vision; night-sight; scotopic vision

vision defect

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. impairment of the sense of sight; visual impairment; visual defect; visual disorder

computer vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Yet another field related to computer vision is signal processing.
  • Some examples of typical computer vision tasks are presented below.
  • The computer vision and machine vision fields have significant overlap.

s vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • UNDRR’s vision is anchored on the four priorities for action set out in the Sendai Framework.
  • The Club’s vision is "to transform street kids into career personnel through the means of soccer".
  • The Strategy and Work Programme outlines the organisation’s vision and activities for the next three years.

s vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • UNDRR’s vision is anchored on the four priorities for action set out in the Sendai Framework.
  • The Club’s vision is "to transform street kids into career personnel through the means of soccer".
  • The Strategy and Work Programme outlines the organisation’s vision and activities for the next three years.

new vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Local residents were invited to give their views on a new vision for the area.
  • Through contemplation, prayer, and japa this mind develops, and with its unfoldment a new vision opens.
  • In November 2009, President Bongo Ondimba announced a new vision for the modernization of Gabon, called "Gabon Emergent".

original vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Peace Corps remained true to the original vision in Albertson's opinion.
  • Almost immediately, Furness's original vision was compromised as the company expanded.
  • As the original name suggests, the original vision for their restaurant was primarily hamburgers.

vision loss

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Most of those patients suffered partial to severe vision loss.
  • This more aggressive target is meant to minimize the risk of progressive glaucoma damage and vision loss.
  • The eye abnormalities including clouding of the cataracts and retinopathy, which can lead to vision loss.

blurred vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He complained of distorted and blurred vision that prevented him from driving.
  • These symptoms disappear in 1 to 2 days, but blurred vision may last for a few weeks.
  • A BAC of 0.09% to 0.25% causes lethargy, sedation, balance problems and blurred vision.

artistic vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Ziad has demonstrated his artistic vision throughout his long career as a director, writer, and producer.
  • "Lullaby", perhaps the last film in which Vertov was able to maintain his artistic vision, was released in 1937.
  • From the very beginning, part of the artistic vision of the original directors had been the development of young musical talent.

own vision

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Fiel will now bring his own vision,” Olson added.
  • Dunstan, on the other hand, had his own vision of the project.
  • And, little by little, I was subconsciously making compromises" [to his own vision].
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