Vulnerability Vulnerably

Vulnerable

Meanings and phrases

vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adj.
  1. susceptible to attack
  2. susceptible to criticism or persuasion or temptation
  3. capable of being wounded or hurt

most vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They are widely thought most vulnerable to Grover's algorithm.
  • Historically, a Dalek's eye has been depicted as its most vulnerable spot.
  • This stage is the most vulnerable state of the parasitoid wasp's lifecycle.

more vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • On land or ice, the North American river otter is considerably more vulnerable.
  • Without adequate understory cover, tigers are even more vulnerable to persecution by humans.
  • High-quality locks may be more vulnerable to bumping unless they employ specific countermeasures.

particularly vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Limestone cliffs are particularly vulnerable to this kind of erosion.
  • Children of low income families are a particularly vulnerable population in Peru.
  • Individuals detained by the military are particularly vulnerable to sexual harassment.

vulnerable species

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is listed as a vulnerable species by the IUCN.
  • "Leucospermum lineare" is considered a vulnerable species.
  • It is a vulnerable species, found in near-coastal sand and leaf litter.

vulnerable to attack

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They were also very vulnerable to attack by cavalry.
  • This would have left both Britain and her Empire vulnerable to attack.
  • This leaves any computer under surveillance using this software vulnerable to attack.

especially vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Children are especially vulnerable to atropine poisoning.
  • This makes them especially vulnerable to slavers from Essos.
  • Males of low status may be especially vulnerable to being childless.

less vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • As more armour plate was added in vital areas, crew members became less vulnerable.
  • Asian elephants are potentially less vulnerable to the ivory trade, as females usually lack tusks.
  • People who assert their presence through noises tend to be less vulnerable, as they alert bears to their presence.

vulnerable people

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It focuses on ensuring rapid response, providing emergency relief and protecting vulnerable people.
  • Dysphoric moods create more associative processing for depressive vulnerable people by negative cognitive biases.
  • He received an MBE in 2015 for services to vulnerable people as founder of Zoe's Place, a hospice for children in Coventry.

very vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • They were also very vulnerable to attack by cavalry.
  • He has a very vulnerable side too.
  • A resolution to protect the very vulnerable wildlife and ecosystem.

vulnerable children

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It targets socially vulnerable children (aged 0–5 years), their mothers and pregnant women.
  • He was also an activist for vulnerable children in the Limpopo town of Oudtshoorn during the 1990s.
  • Serial child molesters seek out vulnerable children and cultivate relationships with them, Seto said.

highly vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The agricultural economy remains highly vulnerable to fluctuations in rainfall.
  • Instead, they'd become highly vulnerable, slightly neurotic and riddled with telling insecurities."
  • When development of that system was cancelled in 1962, the V-bomber fleet was considered highly vulnerable.

listed as vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In 1996, it was listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.
  • "H. histrix" is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.
  • The species is listed as vulnerable in Tasmania.

vulnerable populations

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hilbert has a history of street practice, bearing witness for peace, and continues his community service with vulnerable populations.
  • Occupational hazards may be exacerbated in settings with fewer worker protection policies in place, disproportionately affecting vulnerable populations.
  • In 2017, Stanford Law School awarded Butler the Miles L. Rubin Public Interest Award for her work in "justice and social change in the lives of vulnerable populations."

vulnerable groups

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It was the new vulnerable groups that arose during the colonial period who suffered most in that famine.
  • Policy and regulation to protect vulnerable groups can reduce the exposure of children to toxic substances.
  • Global warming will probably increase the risk of food insecurity for some vulnerable groups, such as the poor.

extremely vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Pilot Jack Peppiatt of 88 Squadron confessed he felt extremely vulnerable up there.
  • In such cases the Vikings were extremely vulnerable to pursuit by the king's joint military forces.
  • The Great Lakes population of piping plover are isolated and extremely vulnerable to extirpation from the Great Lakes region.

considered vulnerable

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This species is considered vulnerable to extinction.
  • It is therefore considered vulnerable.
  • The bristle-thighed curlew is considered vulnerable on the national conservation priority scheme.
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