Wausau Wave-off

Wave

Meanings and phrases

Wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy; originally organized during World War II but now no longer a separate branch

wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water); moving ridge
  2. a movement like that of a sudden occurrence or increase in a specified phenomenon
  3. (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth; undulation
  4. something that rises rapidly
  5. the act of signaling by a movement of the hand; waving; wafture
  6. a hairdo that creates undulations in the hair
  7. an undulating curve; undulation
  8. a persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures)

wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. signal with the hands or nod; beckon
  2. move or swing back and forth; brandish; flourish
  3. move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion; roll; undulate; flap
  4. twist or roll into coils or ringlets; curl
  5. set waves in

Hertzian wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an electromagnetic wave generated by oscillations in an electric circuit

New Wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an art movement in French cinema in the 1960s; Nouvelle Vague

Schrodinger wave equation

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the fundamental equation of wave mechanics; Schrodinger equation

acoustic wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (acoustics) a wave that transmits sound; sound wave

air wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a sound wave that is transmitted via air

alpha wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal brainwave in the electroencephalogram of a person who is awake but relaxed; occurs with a frequency of 8-12 hertz; alpha rhythm

beta wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal brainwave in the encephalogram of a person who is awake and alert; occurs with a frequency between 12 and 30 hertz; beta rhythm

blast wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a region of high pressure travelling through a gas at a high velocity; shock wave

brain wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (neurophysiology) rapid fluctuations of voltage between parts of the cerebral cortex that are detectable with an electroencephalograph; brainwave; cortical potential

carrier wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave that can be modulated in order to transmit a signal; carrier

cold wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave of unusually cold weather
E.g.
  • He went on playing for a local cold wave band called Variété.
  • 1936 North American cold wave The 1936 North American cold wave ranks among the most intense cold waves in the recorded history of North America.

crestless wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the undulating movement of the surface of the open sea; swell

crime wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a sudden rise in the crime rate

delta wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal brainwave in the encephalogram of a person in deep dreamless sleep; occurs with high voltage and low frequency (1 to 4 hertz); delta rhythm
n.
  1. radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge; electromagnetic radiation; nonparticulate radiation
E.g.
  • (b) The atom emits a spherically radiating electromagnetic wave.
  • In the case of an electromagnetic wave these energy states are called quanta of light or photons.
  • Electromagnetic waves in free space must be solutions of Maxwell's electromagnetic wave equation.

finger wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave made with the fingers
n.
  1. (physics) a wave that is hypothesized to propagate gravity and to travel at the speed of light; gravity wave

gravity wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (physics) a wave that is hypothesized to propagate gravity and to travel at the speed of light; gravitation wave

ground wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave propagated on or near the earth's surface

heat wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave of unusually hot weather
E.g.
  • Springfield is in the midst of a massive heat wave.
  • 1983 heat wave 1983 heat wave may refer to:

ionospheric wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a sky wave that is reflected by the ionosphere

long wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave with a wavelength longer than a kilometer (a frequency below 300 kilohertz)

medium wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave with a wavelength between 100 and 1000 meters (a frequency between 300 kilohertz and 3000 kilohertz)
E.g.
  • The program was broadcast on medium wave, on 1476 kHz.
  • It was used as short- and medium wave transmission site.
  • Radio 1 originally broadcast on 1214 kHz medium wave (or 247 metres).

new wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts); avant-garde; vanguard; van
E.g.
  • We're not a punk rock band, we're a new wave band."
  • A new wave of settlers started arriving from the 1970s.
  • This other band were considered more new wave orientated.

permanent wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a series of waves in the hair made by applying heat and chemicals; permanent; perm

radio wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an electromagnetic wave with a wavelength between 0.5 cm to 30,000 m; radio emission; radio radiation

rolling wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a long heavy sea wave as it advances towards the shore; roller; roll

shock wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a region of high pressure travelling through a gas at a high velocity; blast wave
E.g.
  • This is automatically activated in case of nuclear shock wave.
  • This makes the shock wave difficult to diagnose beyond this boundary.
  • In physical terms, a shock wave originates from the point of contact.

short wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave with a wavelength less than 100 meters (a frequency greater than 3 megahertz)
E.g.
  • The short wave antennas were mounted on free-standing lattice towers.
  • Programs are broadcast via short wave, medium wave, FM and satellite.
  • It is the largest centre for medium wave and short wave broadcasting in Japan.

sine wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave whose waveform resembles a sine curve
E.g.
  • For NTSC, the subcarrier is a 3.58 MHz sine wave.
  • For the PAL system it is a 4.43 MHz sine wave.
  • The usual waveform of an AC power circuit is a sine wave.

sky wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a radio wave that is reflected back to earth by the ionosphere or a communications satellite; permits transmission around the curve of the earth's surface

solitary wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (physics) a quantum of energy or quasiparticle that can be propagated as a traveling wave in nonlinear systems and is neither preceded nor followed by another such disturbance; does not obey the superposition principle and does not dissipate; soliton; soliton wave

soliton wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (physics) a quantum of energy or quasiparticle that can be propagated as a traveling wave in nonlinear systems and is neither preceded nor followed by another such disturbance; does not obey the superposition principle and does not dissipate; soliton; solitary wave

sound wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (acoustics) a wave that transmits sound; acoustic wave
E.g.
  • These devices convert a sound wave to or from an electric signal.
  • The transmission of these variations through air is via a sound wave.
  • He is able to clash his arms together to send a destructive sound wave.

standing wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave (as a sound wave in a chamber or an electromagnetic wave in a transmission line) in which the ratio of its instantaneous amplitude at one point to that at any other point does not vary with time; stationary wave
E.g.
  • For each there are two standing wave solutions and .
  • The basis of the drive is that space is a standing wave pattern.
  • In general, thermoacoustic engines can be divided into standing wave and travelling wave devices.

stationary wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave (as a sound wave in a chamber or an electromagnetic wave in a transmission line) in which the ratio of its instantaneous amplitude at one point to that at any other point does not vary with time; standing wave

theta wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the normal brainwave in the encephalogram of a person who is awake but relaxed and drowsy; occurs with low frequency and low amplitude; theta rhythm

tidal wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an overwhelming manifestation of some emotion or phenomenon
  2. an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
  3. a wave resulting from the periodic flow of the tides that is caused by the gravitational attraction of the moon and sun
E.g.
  • In the second round, Alain Rousset had a tidal wave win as national totals rose to 55.83%.
  • The issue features in social and media circles regularly - a tidal wave of public opinion which refuses to ebb.
  • Another tidal wave technology harvests energy from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the sea surface.

traveling wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave in which the medium moves in the direction of propagation of the wave; travelling wave

travelling wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a wave in which the medium moves in the direction of propagation of the wave; traveling wave

wave angle

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the angle of arrival (or departure) of a radio wave with respect to the axis of an antenna array

wave equation

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a differential equation that describes the passage of harmonic waves through a medium
E.g.
  • It was there that he formulated his wave equation.
  • This form will satisfy the wave equation.
  • This assumption leads to the linear or small signal acoustic wave equation.

wave form

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the shape of a wave illustrated graphically by plotting the values of the period quantity against time; waveform; wave shape

wave front

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. all the points just reached by a wave as it propagates
  2. (physics) an imaginary surface joining all points in space that are reached at the same instant by a wave propagating through a medium; wavefront

wave guide

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a hollow metal conductor that provides a path to guide microwaves; used in radar; waveguide

wave mechanics

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the modern form of quantum theory; an extension of quantum mechanics based on Schrodinger's equation; atomic events are explained as interactions between particle waves

wave number

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the reciprocal of the wavelength of a wave

wave off

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. dismiss as insignificant

wave shape

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the shape of a wave illustrated graphically by plotting the values of the period quantity against time; wave form; waveform

wave theory

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (physics) the theory that light is transmitted as waves; undulatory theory; wave theory of light
E.g.
  • But Young was then the only public defender of the wave theory.
  • Much of the behaviour of light can be modelled using classical wave theory.
  • The conceptual gap between the wave theory and selectionism had widened again.

wave theory of light

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (physics) the theory that light is transmitted as waves; wave theory; undulatory theory

wave train

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a succession of waves spaced at regular intervals

first wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This fact triggers the first wave of emigration.
  • The first wave of two releases came on May 16, 2006.
  • In May 1606 the first wave of settlers arrived.

second wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • or Samael's "Worship Him" began the second wave.
  • 1980 saw a second wave of immigration from Cuba.
  • The second wave of two releases came on November 21, 2006.

tropical wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa on August 29.
  • A tropical wave entered the Gulf of Mexico on September 18.
  • On August 18, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa.

wave function

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This feature is known as wave function collapse.
  • The observer collapses the wave function into their own reality.
  • So the wave function is said to supply a non-separable representation.

wave band

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • We're not a punk rock band, we're a new wave band."
  • Haines first came to prominence with new wave band The Doll.
  • The long wave band had never been used.

new wave band

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • We're not a punk rock band, we're a new wave band."
  • Haines first came to prominence with new wave band The Doll.
  • It's Devo is the fifth studio album by the American new wave band Devo.

third wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Arniko is the figure representing the third wave.
  • The music has a hint of third wave ska with influences of the Clash.
  • The third wave was stopped by machine gun fire short of the first line.

wave action

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It prefers sheltered, low wave action waters.
  • All the islands have disappeared from wave action and caldera floor movements.
  • Stagnancy was required to avoid churning or sculpting of the sediment by currents or wave action.

wave functions

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Bosons, such as the photon, have symmetric wave functions instead.
  • His thesis was titled "Analytic properties of bound state wave functions".
  • In rovibronic transitions, the excited states involve three wave functions.
E.g.
  • The central stage in the acoustical process is wave propagation.
  • Propagation delay is equal to "d / s" where "d" is the distance and "s" is the wave propagation speed.
  • However, many similarities exist, the most fundamental of which may be an assumption of wave propagation.

wave music

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Tyrant Records released mod revival, garage rock, and new wave music.
  • The fourth album of the band, "Gæti eins verið..." from 1982, showed a completely new style, the new wave music.
  • APB (band) APB was a Scottish post-punk band, formed in 1979, that blended funk rock, punk rock and new wave music.

wave energy

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is not yet known exactly how much wave energy is available to heat the corona.
  • The currents then collapse suddenly, releasing energy as heat and wave energy in the corona.
  • During a storm event, dunes play a significant role in minimizing wave energy as it moves onshore.

plane wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The wavefunction is not normalizable for a plane wave, but is for a wavepacket.
  • This is because a plane wave incident on a circular lens or mirror is diffracted as described above.
  • The far-field diffraction of a plane wave incident on a circular aperture is often referred to as the Airy Disk.
E.g.
  • The instrument reached its design sensitivity to gravitational wave signals.
  • Mingarelli predicts the nanohertz gravitational wave signatures of such mergers.
  • In general relativity, a gravitational wave is a space-time perturbation which propagates at the speed of light.

large wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Crimped hair was as fashionable as the large wave.
  • Off Long Reef, the ship was hit by a large wave and the collier sank.
  • It is believed she was broached by a large wave, which overwhelmed the ship.

new wave music

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Tyrant Records released mod revival, garage rock, and new wave music.
  • The fourth album of the band, "Gæti eins verið..." from 1982, showed a completely new style, the new wave music.
  • APB (band) APB was a Scottish post-punk band, formed in 1979, that blended funk rock, punk rock and new wave music.

another wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In the 1960s, another wave of civilian oversight began.
  • In the 1960s and 1970s, another wave of economic migrants left Croatia.
  • In more recent millennia, another wave of people arrived on the shores of New Guinea.
E.g.
  • 1980 saw a second wave of immigration from Cuba.
  • The next big wave of immigration started in the 1970s.
  • From the 1890s onward, Paduli saw a wave of immigration to the United States.

wave height

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The maximum tsunami wave height of 11 m (36 ft).
  • A buoy in the Delaware Bay recorded a record-high wave height of .
  • The third wave came within 15 minutes after the second with lower wave height.

continuous wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Unmodulated continuous wave radar cannot measure distance.
  • Only continuous wave (CW) may be used with a maximum effective radiated power (ERP) of 5 watts.
  • Multi-mode operation may also include continuous wave illumination for semi-active radar homing.

big wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The next big wave of immigration started in the 1970s.
  • It is considered to be Cornwall's premier "big wave" location with wave faces as high as .
  • “I really admired her big wave surfing,” said Rochelle in Christina Lessa's book "Women Who Win."

square wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Thus, as a minimum, a square wave is required.
  • This type of force has the shape of a 1 Hz square wave.
  • The basic Royer generates square wave output.

no wave

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • DJs play no wave, punk, musique concrète, post-punk, noise, noise rock, and related styles.
  • Later, in school, he listened to punk and no wave bands like Mission of Burma, Hüsker Dü and Sonic Youth.
  • Conviction (UT album) Conviction is the debut album of no wave band Ut, released in 1986 by Out Records.

wave pool

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Two of these are children's areas and the third is a wave pool.
  • The Cave of Waves is a themed wave pool which can generate waves of up to high.
  • The expansion includes a new six-slide complex, a new wave pool, and several new splash areas for kids.
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