Worcestershire Word-blind

Word

Meanings and phrases

Word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the sacred writings of the Christian religions; Bible; Christian Bible; Book; Good Book; Holy Scripture; Holy Writ; Scripture; Word of God
  2. the divine word of God; the second person in the Trinity (incarnate in Jesus); Son; Logos

word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a unit of language that native speakers can identify
  2. a brief statement
  3. information about recent and important events; news; intelligence; tidings
  4. an exchange of views on some topic; discussion; give-and-take
  5. a verbal command for action
  6. a promise; parole; word of honor
  7. a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted group; password; watchword; parole; countersign
  8. a word is a string of bits stored in computer memory

word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. put into words or an expression; give voice; formulate; phrase; articulate

Word of God

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a manifestation of the mind and will of God
  2. the sacred writings of the Christian religions; Bible; Christian Bible; Book; Good Book; Holy Scripture; Holy Writ; Scripture; Word
  3. the message of the Gospel of Christ

by word of mouth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. orally; viva voce
  2. by spoken rather than written means; orally

closed-class word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that is uninflected and serves a grammatical function but has little identifiable meaning; function word

cognate word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word is cognate with another if both derive from the same word in an ancestral language; cognate

content word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word to which an independent meaning can be assigned; open-class word

curse word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. profane or obscene expression usually of surprise or anger; curse; expletive; oath; swearing; swearword; cuss

deictic word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word specifying identity or spatial or temporal location from the perspective of a speaker or hearer in the context in which the communication occurs; - R.Rommetveit; deictic

dirty word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that is considered to be unmentionable
  2. an offensive or indecent word or phrase; obscenity; smut; vulgarism; filth

entry word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the form of a word that heads a lexical entry and is alphabetized in a dictionary; citation form; main entry word

equivalent word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. two words that can be interchanged in a context are said to be synonymous relative to that context; synonym

four-letter Anglo-Saxon word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of several short English words (often having 4 letters) generally regarded as obscene or offensive; four-letter word

four-letter word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any of several short English words (often having 4 letters) generally regarded as obscene or offensive; four-letter Anglo-Saxon word

function word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that is uninflected and serves a grammatical function but has little identifiable meaning; closed-class word

get word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally; learn; hear; get wind; pick up; find out; get a line; discover; see

ghost word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word form that has entered the language through the perpetuation of an error

good word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. good news
  2. something that recommends (or expresses commendation of) a person or thing as worthy or desirable; recommendation; testimonial

guide word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word printed at the top of the page of a dictionary or other reference book to indicate the first or last item on that page; guideword; catchword

head word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (grammar) the word in a grammatical constituent that plays the same grammatical role as the whole constituent; head
  2. a content word that can be qualified by a modifier; headword

key word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that is used as a pattern to decode an encrypted message
  2. a significant word used in indexing or cataloging

last word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. elegance by virtue of being fashionable; chic; chicness; chichi; modishness; smartness; stylishness; swank
  2. the final statement in a verbal argument
  3. an authoritative statement
E.g.
  • Her last word was... "</nowiki>Beautiful".
  • Ben Gurion wrote in his diary: "This is not the last word."
  • "You're the last word in cosmic rays."

main entry word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the form of a word that heads a lexical entry and is alphabetized in a dictionary; citation form; entry word
n.
  1. a word or utterance of one syllable; monosyllable

nonce word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word with a special meaning used for a special occasion; hapax legomenon

open-class word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word to which an independent meaning can be assigned; content word

opposite word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that expresses a meaning opposed to the meaning of another word, in which case the two words are antonyms of each other; antonym; opposite
n.
  1. a word having more than one meaning; polysemant; polysemous word

polysemous word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word having more than one meaning; polysemant; polysemantic word
n.
  1. a word of more than three syllables; polysyllable
n.
  1. a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; blend; portmanteau

root word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; root; base; stem; theme; radical
E.g.
  • Igorot, from the root word "golot" which means mountain.
  • Each root word has an inherent part of speech: nominal, adjectival, verbal, or adverbial.
  • The root word often undergoes umlaut and suffixation as well as receiving the "ge-" prefix.

send word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. inform (somebody) of something; advise; notify; give notice; apprise; apprize

smear word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an epithet that can be used to smear someone's reputation

spoken word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a word that is spoken aloud; vocable
E.g.
  • By 1980 half the programming was "spoken word".
  • The "Legend" version omits the spoken word intro and outro.
  • The album's song "Jonestown Tea" features elements of spoken word.
n.
  1. a word that is more specific than a given word; hyponym; subordinate
n.
  1. a word that is more generic than a given word; hypernym; superordinate

weasel word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an equivocal qualification; a word used to avoid making an outright assertion

word accent

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the distribution of stresses within a polysyllabic word; word stress

word blindness

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. inability to perceive written words; visual aphasia; alexia

word class

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. one of the traditional categories of words intended to reflect their functions in a grammatical context; part of speech; form class

word deafness

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an impairment in understanding spoken language that is not attributable to hearing loss; auditory aphasia; acoustic aphasia

word division

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. division of a word especially at the end of a line on a page; hyphenation

word finder

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a thesaurus organized to help you find the word you want but cannot think of; wordfinder

word for word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. using exactly the same words; verbatim
E.g.
  • Chapter 29 is practically word for word identical with "Discourse" iii.
  • Due to the complexity of the issues, interpretation is not word for word.
  • Only people in Switzerland still believe that they have to be true word for word."

word form

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the phonological or orthographic sound or appearance of a word that can be used to describe or identify something; form; signifier; descriptor

word game

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. any game involving the formation or alteration or discovery of words

word meaning

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the accepted meaning of a word; word sense; acceptation
E.g.
  • Steorn is a Norse word meaning to guide or manage.
  • Flavum Flavum is a Latin word meaning "yellow".
  • Abshar Abshar () is Persian word meaning Waterfall.

word of advice

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. cautionary advice about something imminent (especially imminent danger or other unpleasantness); admonition; monition; warning

word of farewell

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an acknowledgment or expression of goodwill at parting; farewell

word of honor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a promise; parole; word

word of mouth

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. gossip spread by spoken communication; grapevine; pipeline
E.g.
  • This emotional reaction leads to word of mouth.
  • He would sell locally and regionally through "word of mouth."
  • However, they became bestsellers largely through word of mouth.

word order

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the order of words in a text
E.g.
  • Possession is colloquially expressed by word order.
  • This illustrates the noun-adjective word order.
  • The primary word order is subject–verb–object.

word picture

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a graphic or vivid verbal description; word-painting; delineation; depiction; picture; characterization; characterisation

word play

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. playing on words or speech sounds
E.g.
  • Her pseudonym is Japanese word play with Snow White .
  • (Puns and word play on "sand" flow freely.)
  • Milemarker often used word play and ironic lyrics in their songs.

word processing

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. rapid and efficient processing (storage and printing) of linguistic data for composition and editing
E.g.
  • It was a revolution for the word processing industry.
  • It includes word processing, spreadsheet, database and PIM applications.
  • The library offers internet access, free wifi, word processing, printing and faxing.
n.
  1. an application that provides the user with tools needed to write and edit and format text and to send it to a printer; word processor

word processor

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. an application that provides the user with tools needed to write and edit and format text and to send it to a printer; word processing system
E.g.
  • Wordwise Wordwise is a word processor program published in 1981.
  • AbiWord AbiWord () is a free and open-source software word processor.
  • Word Mobile is a word processor that allows creating and editing documents.

word salad

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. jumble of incoherent speech as sometimes heard in schizophrenia

word sense

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the accepted meaning of a word; word meaning; acceptation

word square

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a puzzle where you fill a square grid with words reading the same down as across; acrostic

word stress

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the distribution of stresses within a polysyllabic word; word accent

word string

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a linear sequence of words as spoken or written; string of words; linguistic string

word structure

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the admissible arrangement of sounds in words; morphology; sound structure; syllable structure

written word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the written form of a word
E.g.
  • The written word has been a compelling vehicle for him.
  • Each exemplifies the power of art, music, and the written word."
  • His early literary pursuits fueled his continued fascination with the written word.

word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The word “Co-redemptrix” would obscure this origin.
  • The word “simulate” appears in boxes five, eight, and nine.
  • Hence, the word “reverse” is used.

use the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He was the first person to use the word "protoplasm".
  • On occasion, I will feel free to use the word.
  • The Council use the word on signage locally.

received word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The British crews received word of the declaration of war by radio.
  • Kids Help Phone staff and volunteers received word of the crash the day it occurred.
  • In July 2010 the university received word it had been accepted into NCAA Division II.

used the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Other fan literature has used the word as well.
  • Frederic Farrar first used the word "glossolalia" in 1879.
  • Hemingway habitually used the word "and" in place of commas.

single word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Cruz choose a single word for his motto: "Caritas".
  • Not a single word, not a single remark!
  • Concepts that can be equated to a single word are called "lexical concepts".

every word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Later she forced her ten sisters to read every word.
  • Not all five cases are attested for every word.
  • They didn't make sense, so she had to memorize every word.

first word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The Surah takes its name from its first word al-qariah.
  • The Surah takes its name Aḍ-Ḍuḥā from the very first word.
  • The first word may rhyme with the fourth or the fifth word.

same word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The same word is also used to refer to a speed bump.
  • Latin Asia and Greek Ἀσία appear to be the same word.
  • The surnames Gall and Gaul are derived from the same word.

word used

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Luxembourg" is the escape word used.
  • His general profane word used in all other appearances is "Dadgum".
  • However, it was not a word used by the Chinese themselves during the period.

each word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A new person is pointed at as each word is said.
  • In a general dictionary, each word may have multiple meanings.
  • The loop thus prints out each word followed by its frequency count.

using the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • IN German, emphasis is indicated using the word "selbst".
  • Comparatives are expressed using the word : "A X [B]" (A is more X [than B]).
  • Another way to achieve immersion is by using the word "you" when addressing the participant.

language word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Raumati" is the Māori language word for "summer".
  • "Chenocetah" is a Cherokee language word meaning "see all around."
  • Alternatively, from "Jameco" after a Lenape language word for "beaver".

word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In Malayalam, the word ‘koor’ means loyalty and 'pada' means army.
  • The word ‘qur’an’ is only used 70 times throughout the entirety of the Qur'an.
  • The word ‘herdgang’ originates from triangular squares that marked the end of dirt roads.

uses the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • To explain this, Saussure uses the word "bœuf" as an example.
  • An open transition usually uses the word "comprises" or "comprising".
  • Modern fiction instead uses the word "gnomess" to refer to female gnomes.

spread the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This helped spread the word about the magazine.
  • Another way Cards for Hospitalized Kids has spread the word is through the media.
  • It's important that we use this platform to spread the word of peace and harmony."

sent word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Castilla simultaneously sent word to García Moreno that he wished to meet with him as well.
  • He also sent word to his friends in Benin that a Finnish acquaintance of his would be coming to the country.
  • Trapping them in a ravine, they proved stronger than she had anticipated, and she sent word to the city for re-enforcements.

no word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There is no word on when the team plans to race again.
  • They have no word for "love", and do not believe in God.
  • But there are some languages that have no word for "green".

word comes

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The word comes from the Middle Dutch root "brak".
  • The word comes "...from Old French professeur (14c.)
  • The word comes from the Latin "arcus".

word or phrase

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The original word or phrase is known as the "subject" of the anagram.
  • Any word or phrase that exactly reproduces the letters in another order is an anagram.
  • A simple word or phrase, for example, spoken between two people, can have multiple meanings.

word means

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Thus, the word means "taking hold of one's nerves".
  • The Carolinian word means "People of the Deep Sea."
  • In Japanese this word means science or art.

another word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Hittleman wrote: "'Self' is another word for 'God'.
  • Not another word passed between us; but after another pause he wrung my hand and left me.
  • I think the other player just felt it, and then he sat down and never said another word."

word is used

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The word is used for the oath of allegiance to an emir.
  • The same word is used in 10:4 of Judas Iscariot’s betrayal of Jesus.
  • That word is used either in itself or before the given name or surname.

word is derived

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The word is derived from Persian word "nard" ().
  • The word is derived from the Greek "" 'distortion, dislocation'.
  • The word is derived from the Ancient Greek ἄσφαλτος "ásphaltos".

word processors

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • These were probably the first true WYSIWYG word processors to become known to many people.
  • Besides word processors, other programs can and do support the Office Open XML text format.
  • Through history, there have been 3 types of word processors: mechanical, electronic and software.

new word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A new word came into the English language through an incident that occurred in Mayo.
  • In the sixteenth century there was a level of ambiguity as to how to use this new word.
  • Affix In linguistics, an affix is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form.

word came

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In time, the word came to be restricted to only such beer.
  • The word came to English from the New Latin of science and medicine.
  • A new word came into the English language through an incident that occurred in Mayo.

word that means

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Sabari" is a Bambara word that means patience.
  • αρχοντες) is a Greek word that means "ruler".
  • Surya Surya (; , ) is a Sanskrit word that means the Sun.

code word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • ", Operation Thunderclap being the code word initiating the breakout.
  • "Blues" became a code word for a record designed to sell to black listeners.
  • "anti-racist is a code word for anti-white") or promoting white pride websites.

compound word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Rudraksha is a Sanskrit compound word consisting of Rudra (Sanskrit: रुद्र) and ' (Sanskrit: अक्ष ).
  • Werkbund Werkbund, a German compound word denoting a productive or creative association, may refer to:
  • The island's name is a compound word formed by the Spanish words for "strong" (fuerte) and "fortune" (ventura).

final word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • rather than singing "brave" as the final word.
  • The band's Twitter account confirmed that these shows would be the final word from the band.
  • According to Sam Goldwyn, critics did not like DeMille's films, but the audiences did and "they have the final word".

word itself

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Utsav" the word itself defines the meaning festival.
  • The word itself is the plural form of .
  • The word itself is of french origin.

word spread

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Slowly, a word spread around that Balan and Ashok Raj are childhood friends.
  • Special trains brought visitors up the mountains of Colorado, and word spread rapidly around the country.
  • In Berlin, word spread of Bismarck's admiring description of Disraeli, ""Der alte Jude, das ist der Mann!

word derives

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The word derives from the Latin "credo" for "I believe".
  • This word derives from the Greek Βάρβαρος, which means "stuttering".
  • This word derives from two Proto-Indo-European stems, * "alone" and * "living".

coined the word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In this book, Hyde also coined the word "cuneiform".
  • Nelson coined the word "hypertext".
  • Ursula K. Le Guin coined the word "ansible" in her 1966 novel "Rocannon's World".

word list

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It is preserved only in a word list from 1859.
  • That number is then used to look up a word in a word list.
  • The 850 core words of Basic English are found in Wiktionary's Basic English word list.

when word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Sporadic fighting therefore continued until Sunday, when word of the surrender was got to the other rebel garrisons.
  • Clavell was visiting Corfu when word arrived that the island had been transferred from Russian control to France in the Treaty of Tilsit.
  • But when word spread that they were appealing, thousands of peasants flocked to the castle, some of whom stormed shops and the castle gate.

other word

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Donegal annihilated Cork, there is no other word for it."
  • The Christian Arabs of today have no other word for "God" than "Allah".
  • In other word, Balance of power between states opts for decentralization of power.

word which means

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Kolokol Kolokol is Russian word which means bell.
  • "Talab" is a Hindi word which means "Pond" in English.
  • "Chachoengsao" is a Khmer word which means 'deep canal'.
Wordnet