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Words

Meanings and phrases

words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the words that are spoken
  2. the text of a popular song or musical-comedy number; lyric; language
  3. language that is spoken or written
  4. words making up the dialogue of a play; actor's line; speech
  5. an angry dispute; quarrel; wrangle; row; run-in; dustup

choice of words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the manner in which something is expressed in words; - G.S.Patton; wording; diction; phrasing; phraseology; verbiage
E.g.
  • His choice of words were those less chosen, terse, precise, kind.
  • In dialogue about this subject, choice of words is a sensitive matter.
  • Upon returning to Canada he later admitted he was guilty of a "poor choice of words".

empty words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. loud and confused and empty talk; palaver; hot air; empty talk; rhetoric

have words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
v.
  1. censure severely or angrily; call on the carpet; take to task; rebuke; rag; trounce; reproof; lecture; reprimand; jaw; dress down; call down; scold; chide; berate; bawl out; remonstrate; chew out; chew up; lambaste; lambast

honeyed words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. inconsequential expressions of affection; sweet nothings

idle words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk; wind; malarkey; malarky; jazz; nothingness

in other words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
adv.
  1. otherwise stated; put differently

string of words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. a linear sequence of words as spoken or written; word string; linguistic string

words per minute

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
n.
  1. the rate at which words are produced (as in speaking or typing); wpm
E.g.
  • Many stenotype users can reach 300 words per minute.
  • Steve Woodmore can rapidly articulate at a rate of 637 words per minute.
  • He uses one finger to type on a computer keyboard, and he types 20 words per minute.

other words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In other words, the sound in the film is diegetic.
  • ), as well as , and a small number of other words.
  • In other words, the real numbers are not countable.

own words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • sold, in Marchand's own words, "1,000 copies".
  • In Peter's own words, Faison "rejected and hated" him.
  • Her own words (English) Story (documentary in English)

last words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His last words were "God of my soul, hold me firm."
  • His last words were: "Yes, Yes, as God wills it.
  • His last words were said to be "Remember the Dharma!

words such

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The paper has words such as YES, NO and MAYBE printed on it.
  • Examples of the exception can be found in words such as (bright).
  • for "age" is present in words such as "longevity" and "mediaeval".

few words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The first few words of the song, "Children behave!
  • I told him in a few words about the purpose of my visit.
  • Bulgarian adopted also a few words of Thracian and Bulgar origin.

words and phrases

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Vocabulary of Canadian English contains a few distinctive words and phrases.
  • Among other exercises, patients practice the repetition of words and phrases.
  • Several words and phrases from "Nineteen Eighty-Four" have entered popular language.

many words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The form and meaning of many words have evolved.
  • "...I tried to jam so many words in that chorus.
  • The first was how many words the primary caregiver spoke to the child.

new words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • I am the sort of poet who coins new words in the language".
  • they created new words out of nothing.
  • Many new words can be derived simply by changing these suffixes.

play on words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This play on words is similar to Cockney Rhyming Slang.
  • (The name is a play on words; pronounced "Gory and Defeated.")
  • The name is a play on words meaning 9th Chandrabindoo or Not Chandrabindoo.

following words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He described Nietzsche in the following words.
  • Some of the following words are still being used today, but may have transferred meanings.
  • For example, the following words end in a vowel sound: "pied", "aller", "les", "", "beaux".

final words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • His final words were "Für Christus und Österreich!"
  • His final words were "¡Revolución Sí, Golpe Militar No!"
  • His final words were "Allah, Allah."

words used

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The exact words used can also differ from region to region.
  • There has been some controversy over some of the words used.
  • Medical dictionary A medical dictionary is a lexicon for words used in medicine.

words and music

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The words and music of the alma mater are by Jim Parker, 2008.
  • Most of the words and music were written by Edward Dixon House.
  • In 1905, in "The Methodist Hymnal" the words and music become one and were sent to churches around the globe.

loan words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • There are loan words from both Arabic and French.
  • Phonemes in italics are taken from loan words.
  • To avoid loan words, he created Lithuanian terminology.

number of words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Yet another case, the locative, is limited to a small number of words.
  • Bade and Ngizim have borrowed a number of words from the Kanuri language.
  • A number of words and names for which Etruscan origin has been proposed survive in Latin.

words link

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • 2009 in poetry Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).
  • 1696 in poetry Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).
  • 1694 in poetry Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

first words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Her reported first words were, "Is the bloody man dead yet?"
  • This is a repetition of the first words of Schopenhauer's main work.
  • His first words were "A pint of mild and 20 fags, missus" in June 1964.

certain words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It allows the poet to stress certain words and shape the meaning of the poem.
  • When needing extra emphasis to certain words, there is the use of rising glides.
  • There are some notable regional variations in the pronunciations of certain words.

words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The name changed again over next 20 years as the words “Employees” and “Federal” were dropped.
  • One of Jackson’s most distinctive features are the words “Living Legend” tattooed on his face.
  • The origin of the name of the bay is most likely associated with the Ainu words “en” and “willow”.

between words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Irish monks introduced spacing between words in the 7th century.
  • As was common at the time, there is no separation between words.
  • Once you can spell fluently, simply put a short pause between words.

different words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Two different words describing places in the Hebrew Bible use this root.
  • ), nouns pertaining to younger animals change into entirely different words (e.g.
  • Very often, different words can be used to alter the emphasis of a sentence – e.g.

spoken words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • It recognized 16 spoken words and the digits 0 through 9.
  • Redford is the only cast member, and the film has very few spoken words.
  • The film incorporates spoken words from Obama's audio book, "Dreams from My Father".

foreign words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The characters "q", "w" and "x" appear only in foreign words.
  • These, and "w", are used in Turkish Braille as well for foreign words.
  • However, direct phonetic borrowing of foreign words has gone on since ancient times.

words per

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Many stenotype users can reach 300 words per minute.
  • Steve Woodmore can rapidly articulate at a rate of 637 words per minute.
  • He uses one finger to type on a computer keyboard, and he types 20 words per minute.

such words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The "o" in such words as "holy, goal, load, know," etc.
  • There is debate whether such words are genuine compounds or pseudo-compounds.
  • There are hundreds of such words, and the list below does not aim at completeness.

words meaning

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "Nectomys" is derived from Greek words meaning "mouse" and "swimming".
  • The name is a play on words meaning 9th Chandrabindoo or Not Chandrabindoo.
  • Some languages do not answer yesses with single words meaning 'yes' or 'no'.

words or phrases

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • When talking, the speaker includes words or phrases from other languages that they think fit into the conversation.
  • In addition to physical pain, engrams could include words or phrases spoken in the vicinity while the patient was unconscious.
  • Below are a few examples of adjectives with the noun it modifies: Pronouns are words or phrases that take the place of nouns.

same words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The same words are also echoed in the narration of "The Lion Has Wings" documentary (1939).
  • When time ran out, the isolated team returned to the stage, and acted out the same words as the first team.
  • The same words also form the first sentence of Madeleine L'Engle's Newbery Medal-winning novel "A Wrinkle in Time."

all words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • This is no longer true for most modern speakers, for whom has reduced to in all words.
  • The set of all words over an alphabet Σ is usually denoted by Σ (using the Kleene star).
  • By comparison, almost all words in Ido take on characteristic Ido finals and orthographies.

compound words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • tawo-tawo, balay-balay), compound words (e.g.
  • The primary stress of compound words is often placed on the ending.
  • "run", or they may be morphologically complex, as in compound words (e.g.

wrote the words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Newton wrote the words from personal experience.
  • According to Mitchell, Green wrote the words and Green and Hodges wrote the tune together.
  • Dee wrote the words to a nonsense song that went to number 1 in 1945 called "Chickery Chick".

common words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • In the English language, there occurred a shift from common words (e.g.
  • Here are some examples of common words and expressions that are different in the two languages.
  • However some common words such as monadh = Welsh mynydd, Cumbric *monidh are particularly evident.

million words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • A million words must have been written on the subject.
  • Taken together, the and comprise roughly 40 million words and 24,000 images.
  • Galen may have written as many as 500 treatises, amounting to some 10 million words.

more words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • Also swapping of two or more words will not be detected.
  • The more words were discovered, the more the figure diminished.
  • David shoves Gary back and after a few more words the pair fight.

no words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • "She minced no words about the film," Davis said.
  • After the race she told "Ocean Press": "I have no words.
  • I am aware however that no words of apology will ever be sufficient".

war of words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The war of words was thereby retracted on both sides.
  • "In the war's aftermath came a war of words.

opening words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The document's name derives from its opening words.
  • Ditton parish register has as its opening words, "The Register book of Ditton beginning Anno Dom.
  • The Latin name of the creed, "Quicunque vult", is taken from the opening words, "Whosoever wishes".

both words

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • The company name is a portmanteau of the words "quick" and "bids", and is pronounced the way both words sound.
  • There is widespread confusion between the terms quartersawn and "riftsawn" with both words defined with opposite meanings and as synonyms.
  • These "putrid miasmas" were thought by many to cause the spread of "contagion" and "infection" – both words used before the germ theory of infection.

words spoken

Pronunciation American British Australian Indian
E.g.
  • He does not care for the words spoken.
  • Last words (disambiguation) Last words are a person's final words spoken before death.
  • uses the term in his song "sorry", where the first words spoken on the track are "My cup runneth over...".
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